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Politics As Trump fumes, senators craft a bill to protect Mueller

10:15  11 april  2018
10:15  11 april  2018 Source:   ap.org

McConnell: Legislation to protect Mueller not needed

  McConnell: Legislation to protect Mueller not needed Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said he doesn't think the Senate needs to pass legislation protecting special counsel Robert Mueller, arguing President Trump won't fire him.McConnell has made similar comments in the past, but his Tuesday remarks were notable coming less than 24 hours after news broke of an FBI raid at the office of Trump's personal lawyer, Michael Cohen. The raid was made after a referral by Mueller, whi ch led Trump on Monday to note that "many people" had said he should fire the special counsel.Despite Trump's evident anger at the raid, McConnell said legislation was not necessary.

President Donald Trump was so incensed by the FBI's raid of his personal attorney's office and hotel room that he's privately pondered firing Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and publicly mused about ousting special counsel Robert Mueller .

Even senators who voted against the legislation warned Mr. Trump against trying to dismiss Mr. Mueller . Bills to Protect Mueller Are Bipartisan, but the Path Forward Is Uncertain. Sept. 26, 2017.

President Donald Trump speaks in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, April 9, 2018, at the start of a meeting with military leaders. Federal agents raided the office of Trump's personal attorney Michael Cohen, seizing records on topics including a $130,000 payment made to a porn actress who says she had sex with Trump more than a decade ago. The move ignited the president's anger, with Trump calling it a © The Associated Press President Donald Trump speaks in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, April 9, 2018, at the start of a meeting with military leaders. Federal agents raided the office of Trump's personal attorney Michael Cohen, seizing records on topics including a $130,000 payment made to a porn actress who says she had sex with Trump more than a decade ago. The move ignited the president's anger, with Trump calling it a "disgrace" that federal agents "broke into" the office of his personal attorney. He also called special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation "an attack on our country." (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

WASHINGTON — A bipartisan group of four senators is moving to protect special counsel Robert Mueller's job as President Donald Trump publicly muses about firing him.

Poll: Nearly 70 percent of Americans say Trump shouldn't fire Mueller

  Poll: Nearly 70 percent of Americans say Trump shouldn't fire Mueller A majority of American voters believe that President Trump should not fire special counsel Robert Mueller, according to a poll released Tuesday.A Quinnipiac University poll, conducted April 6-9, found that 69 percent of voters, including 55 percent of Republicans, oppose Trump firing Mueller. Just 13 percent of voters said they support Trump firing Mueller, according to the poll.A little more than half - 52 percent - of voters said Mueller is conducting a "fair investigation." Among Republicans, 54 percent said they believe the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election is not fair.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Four senators — two Republicans and two Democrats — are taking a step to protect special counsel Robert Mueller ’s job as The measure, which combines two bipartisan bills introduced last summer, signals escalating concerns in Congress as Trump fumes about a Monday

WASHINGTON (AP) — Four senators — two Republicans and two Democrats — are taking a step to protect special counsel Robert Mueller 's job as The measure, which combines two bipartisan bills introduced last summer, signals escalating concerns in Congress as Trump fumes about a Monday

Republican Sens. Thom Tillis of North Carolina and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Democratic Sens. Chris Coons of Delaware and Cory Booker of New Jersey plan to introduce legislation Wednesday that would give any special counsel a 10-day window in which he or she could seek expedited judicial review of a firing, according to two people familiar with the legislation. They were not authorized to discuss the bill ahead of its release and requested anonymity.

The legislation, which combines two bipartisan bills introduced last summer, signals escalating concerns in Congress as Trump has fumed about a Monday FBI raid of the office of his personal attorney, Michael Cohen. Trump has privately pondered firing Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and publicly criticized Mueller and his Russia probe.

Nationwide protests planned if Trump fires Mueller or Rosenstein

  Nationwide protests planned if Trump fires Mueller or Rosenstein U.S. progressive groups are gearing up for nationwide protests should President Donald Trump fire the special counsel investigating Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, or replace the deputy U.S. attorney general overseeing the probe. An ouster of Special Counsel Robert Mueller would signal that Trump was acting as if he was above the law, said MoveOn.org, which is planning 800 demonstrations across the country.Every state will have at least one "Nobody Is Above The Law" rally and at least 320,000 people have pledged to attend so far, according to MoveOn's website.

The legislation, which combines two bipartisan bills introduced last summer, signals escalating concerns in Congress as Trump has fumed about a Monday FBI raid of the office of his personal attorney, Michael Cohen. Senators move to protect Mueller as Trump criticizes probe.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Four senators — two Republicans and two Democrats — are taking a step to protect special counsel Robert Mueller 's job as The measure, which combines two bipartisan bills introduced last summer, signals escalating concerns in Congress as Trump fumes about a Monday

In addition to investigating potential ties between Russia and the Trump campaign, Mueller is also examining whether the president's actions constitute obstruction of justice. As the investigation has worn on, Trump has repeatedly called it a "witch hunt." On Monday, after the Cohen raid, he said it was "an attack on our country." The raid was overseen by the U.S. Attorney's office in Manhattan and was based in part on a referral from Mueller, said Cohen's lawyer, Stephen Ryan.

After introducing similar bills in August, when Trump first began criticizing the Mueller probe, both Tillis and Graham had been quiet for months on whether the legislation was still needed as Democrats continued to push for a bill. Both Republicans said they didn't think Trump would really move to fire Mueller. But the senators moved to push out a new, combined bill in the hours after Trump's tirade.

Trump insists that if he wanted to fire Mueller, he already would have

  Trump insists that if he wanted to fire Mueller, he already would have President Donald Trump said Thursday that if he wanted to fire special counsel Robert Mueller, he would have months ago. "If I wanted to fire Robert Mueller in December, as reported by the Failing New York Times, I would have fired him. Just more Fake News from a biased newspaper," Trump tweeted Thursday morning. Trump was disputing a New York Times report published Tuesday that said the President sought to fire Mueller in December following reports that Mueller was seeking Trump's financial records. CNN has also reported that Trump has wanted to fire Mueller for months.

WASHINGTON — A bipartisan group of four senators is moving to protect special counsel Robert Mueller 's job as President Donald Trump publicly muses about firing him. Republican Sens . Thom Tillis of North Carolina and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Democratic Sens .

As Trump fumes , senators bid to protect the special counsel. After introducing similar bills in August, when Trump first began criticizing Mueller 's investigation, Tillis and Graham kept quiet for months about the need for the legislation while Democrats continued to push it.

Under the legislation, the expedited review would determine whether the special counsel was fired for good cause. The bill would also ensure that any staff, documents and other investigation materials were preserved as the matter was pending.

It's unclear if it could ever become law. Such legislation is unlikely to move through the House, and many Republicans in the Senate still expressed confidence Tuesday that Trump would not fire the special counsel.

"I don't think he's going to be removed," said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. "I think he'll be allowed to finish his job."

Still, senators have publicly and privately let the White House know that firing Mueller would be a mistake, said the No. 2 Republican, Sen. John Cornyn of Texas.

"There would be serious repercussions," said Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn. "I've shared with the president what a massive mistake it would be for him to do this. I've done that in person."

Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said Tuesday on Fox Business News: "It would be suicide for the president to want to talk about firing Mueller. The less the president said on this whole thing, the better off he would be, the stronger his presidency would be."

Democratic leaders have pushed for Republicans to move legislation to protect Mueller.

"Stand up and say what the president is doing is wrong," said Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. "Make it clear that firing Mueller or interfering in his investigation crosses a red line."

Trump cannot directly fire Mueller. Any dismissal, for cause, would have to be carried out by Rosenstein, who appointed the counsel in May 2017 and has repeatedly expressed support for him.

___

Associated Press writer Lisa Mascaro contributed to this report.

Senate panel punts Mueller protection bill to next week .
The Senate Judiciary Committee is delaying legislation protecting special counsel Robert Mueller until next week. "We will hold this bill over today at the request of several members of the committee," Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) said during a committee meeting on Thursday.

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