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Politics Rosenstein Asks Prosecutors to Help With Kavanaugh Papers in Unusual Request

23:10  11 july  2018
23:10  11 july  2018 Source:   nytimes.com

Dem senator: Trump's Supreme Court pick shows he's 'terrified of Robert Mueller'

  Dem senator: Trump's Supreme Court pick shows he's 'terrified of Robert Mueller' Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) on Monday laid into President Trump for nominating Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, saying he did so to protect himself in the ongoing Russia probe. Merkley suggested Trump picked Kavanaugh because of the judge's past writings that argue a president should be shielded from ongoing investigations.

WASHINGTON — Rod J. Rosenstein , the deputy attorney general, has asked federal prosecutors to help review the government documents of Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh , President Trump’s Supreme Court Mr. Rosenstein ’s request was an unusual insertion of politics into federal law enforcement.

The new disclosures come in response to a motion Manafort's lawyers filed asking to have the criminal charges pending against him thrown out. Prosecutors also said Rosenstein — who has sometimes been the focus of Trump's ire — gave a specific go-ahead for Manafort's indictment and Mueller's

a man sitting in a chair: Former law enforcement officials described Rod J. Rosenstein’s directive as a troubling precedent. © T.J. Kirkpatrick for The New York Times Former law enforcement officials described Rod J. Rosenstein’s directive as a troubling precedent.

WASHINGTON — Rod J. Rosenstein, the deputy attorney general, has asked federal prosecutors to help review the government documents of Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh, President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, according to a letter obtained by The New York Times on Wednesday.

Mr. Rosenstein’s request was an unusual insertion of politics into federal law enforcement. While the Justice Department has helped work on previous Supreme Court nominations, department lawyers in Washington typically carry out that task, not prosecutors who pursue criminal investigations nationwide.

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  McConnell to meet with Trump's Supreme Court pick Tuesday Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) will meet with Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump's Supreme Court pick, on Tuesday as he begins to build support on Capitol Hill. Kavanaugh will meet with McConnell and Vice President Pence at 11:15 a.m., according to guidance from the White House. The meeting comes after Trump announced on Monday night that he would nominate Kavanaugh-currently a judge on the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit- to succeed retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Darrell Issa Asks Rod Rosenstein Why A Second Prosecutor Has Not Been Appointed When Evidence Exists. During a House Oversight Committee Hearing

After President Donald Trump issued a Twitter demand to the Department of Justice Sunday, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein caved to the demand. He went on to call the expansion of the investigation a kind of “mission creep,” but noted it isn’t unusual .

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But in an email sent this week to the nation’s 93 United States attorneys, Mr. Rosenstein asked each office to provide up to three federal prosecutors “who can make this important project a priority for the next several weeks.” Names were to be submitted to Mr. Rosenstein’s office by the end of Wednesday.

Mr. Trump nominated Judge Kavanaugh on Monday to replace Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, who is retiring. In years of public service — including work for the independent counsel investigation of President Bill Clinton, on the 2000 Florida recount and as a White House aide to George W. Bush — Judge Kavanaugh generated a lengthy paper trail. That had Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader, privately expressing concern that it might be used against him in his Senate confirmation hearings.

Santorum on Kavanaugh: Trump bowed to Washington elite

  Santorum on Kavanaugh: Trump bowed to Washington elite Rick Santorum said Monday that President Donald Trump "bowed to the elite in Washington" by picking Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his Supreme Court nominee. "Well, I think that Donald Trump said he was going to energize the base with this pick. I don't think he did that," the Republican former Pennsylvania senator and CNN political commentator told Chris Cuomo on CNN's "Cuomo PrimeTime." Kavanaugh has been dubbed a Washington insider, having worked in both Bush administrations, and is currently a judge on the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia circuit.

Wood also denied a request from Trump for a temporary restraining order against his own justice department, which would have explicitly ordered prosecutors to not begin going through the files from Cohen’s home, office and hotel. The judge’s decisions dealt a blow to Trump and Cohen, who asked

Today's paper . The Observer. Congress could have passed legislation to appoint an independent prosecutor to a new investigation, or it Former assistant attorney general Laurie Robinson also expressed confidence in Rosenstein ’s judgement in an interview with the Guardian on Wednesday.

The subject line of Mr. Rosenstein’s email read, “Personal Message to U.S. Attorneys from the Deputy AG.”

Former law enforcement officials described Mr. Rosenstein’s directive as a troubling precedent.

“It’s flat-out wrong to have career federal prosecutors engaged in a political process like the vetting of a Supreme Court nominee,” said Christopher Hunter, a former F.B.I. agent and federal prosecutor who is running for Congress. “It takes them away from the mission they’re supposed to be fulfilling, which is effective criminal justice enforcement.”

Mr. Hunter, who served as an F.B.I. agent and federal prosecutor for nearly 11 years, said he could not recall receiving a similar solicitation to work on a Supreme Court nomination.

While federal prosecutors have not been tapped to help with recent nominations, including Justices Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor, “the scope of the production of executive branch documents we’ve been asked for is many, many times as large,” said Sarah Isgur Flores, a Justice Department spokeswoman.

Kavanaugh's views on presidential powers could be flashpoint

  Kavanaugh's views on presidential powers could be flashpoint Democratic opponents of Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court say his past writings suggest he would be inclined to side with President Donald Trump if legal issues arise from special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation. Load Error

At one point, Sullivan began to ask Van Grack if prosecutors planned to make a formal motion to depart from the Kavanaugh paper chase threatens to draw out confirmation battle. How a private meeting with Kennedy helped Trump get to Congress Should Stop Messing With Rod Rosenstein .

Still, other presidents have done it gradually in order to minimize disruption, giving those asked to resign more time to make the transition while keeping some inherited prosecutors in place, as it had appeared Mr. Trump would do with Mr. Bharara. Mr. Obama, for example, kept Mr. Rosenstein , who

The request adds to the workload for some United States attorneys’ offices, which have been handed increased responsibility by Attorney General Jeff Sessions as he seeks to give local prosecutors more decision-making power.

Mr. Rosenstein wrote that he expected to need the equivalent of 100 full-time lawyers to work on Judge Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearing, and that the work would be supervised by the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Policy in Washington.

The production of documents could slow down a confirmation hearing that has already shaped up as a sharp partisan battle. Democratic lawmakers say they want to inspect all of Judge Kavanaugh’s documents, including his staff work and over 300 opinions he has issued as a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

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Kavanaugh documents could answer decade-old question of whether he misled Congress .
In 2007, two Democratic senators accused Kavanaugh of misleading Congress over his role in formulating Bush-era detention policies.WASHINGTON — The confirmation process for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh could answer a question first raised more than a decade ago about whether the judge once misled Congress, as two senators then alleged.

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