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Politics McConnell Walks A Tightrope To Keep Collins, Murkowski And Flake In The Fold

15:52  02 october  2018
15:52  02 october  2018 Source:   talkingpointsmemo.com

Republicans are digging in on Kavanaugh. Here's why.

  Republicans are digging in on Kavanaugh. Here's why. Republicans are hardening their support for President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, dismissing new allegations of sexual misconduct that threatened the conservative jurist's confirmation and strained the GOP's standing with women six weeks before Election Day. The GOP punched back hard Monday, seeming to cast aside — for now — worries that President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee could turn off female voters and sink their hopes of holding complete control of Congress following the November midterms. Rather than peel away from Kavanaugh, many GOP senators seemed to stiffen their resolve.

Jeff Flake (R-AZ), Susan Collins (R-ME) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) from crossing the aisle to vote with the Democrats. But at the same time, he is invested in holding the vote sooner rather than later. Per Politico, he’d prefer to end debate in the middle of this week, hold a procedural vote on Friday

McConnell calls Kavanaugh confirmation proudest moment as senator : McConnell Walks A Tightrope To Keep Collins , Murkowski Vice President Mike Pence also tweeted his support for Kavanaugh on Friday. Pence often presides over momentous votes in the Senate , and is expected to

Mitch McConnell© J. Scott Applewhite, AP Mitch McConnell

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) is currently engaged in a delicate balancing act.

He’s trying to push ahead with a timeline that would mean a vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Sunday, while also applying pressure gently enough to keep the moderate Republicans in line.

According to a Monday Politico report, McConnell is solely focused on the “gang of three” now and has ditched his “plow right through” rhetoric to keep Sens. Jeff Flake (R-AZ), Susan Collins (R-ME) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) from crossing the aisle to vote with the Democrats.

McConnell projects confidence but doesn't have the votes for Kavanaugh yet

  McConnell projects confidence but doesn't have the votes for Kavanaugh yet While a small group of GOP senators are considered the most problematic, there are potentially several more watching closely."We're going to be moving forward. I'm confident we're going to win. I'm confident he will be confirmed in the very near future," McConnell told reporters Tuesday afternoon.

Update: Senators Susan Collins and Joe Manchin III announced their support of Judge Kavanaugh ensuring his confirmation to the Supreme Court. For the lastest, read here. WASHINGTON — The Senate voted on Friday morning to cut off debate and move to a final vote on Judge Brett M

Three key Republican senators condemned President Trump for mocking Brett Kavanaugh’s accuser, Christine Blasey Ford.

But at the same time, he is invested in holding the vote sooner rather than later. Per Politico, he’d prefer to end debate in the middle of this week, hold a procedural vote on Friday and hold the ultimate confirmation vote on Sunday. However, that timeline depends on the FBI investigation being wrapped by Wednesday.

Though he may want to, McConnell would probably not risk ending debate before the FBI investigation is complete, to avoid alienating the three moderates.

This task may now be further complicated for him, since Collins has advocated for an FBI interview with Julie Swetnick, Kavanaugh’s third accuser who was initially left off the witness list.

According to a Monday Portland Press Herald report, Collins spokeswoman Annie Clark said that her boss along with Flake and Murkowski “advocated for the additional background investigation because she believed that it could help the senators evaluate the claims that have been brought to the Judiciary Committee. That would include the allegations that were brought by Julie Swetnick.”

Here's what Jeff Flake just did — and what it means for Brett Kavanaugh

  Here's what Jeff Flake just did — and what it means for Brett Kavanaugh Just as Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee were on the verge of their 11-10 vote to favorably recommend the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake had a change of heart. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); And that change of heart changed everything — albeit temporarily.Here's what happened — because it's complicated: 1. Flake voted for Kavanaugh to move out of the committee.

Republican Sens. Susan Collins of Maine and Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska both said Wednesday they would not vote to support Betsy DeVos, President Donald Trump's choice for education secretary.

Senators Lisa Murkowski Lisa Ann Murkowski Sinema touts bipartisan record as Arizona Democrats plan censure vote Kavanaugh impeachment push hits Capitol buzz saw McConnell lashes out at Democrats over 'unhinged' criticism of Kavanaugh MORE (R-Alaska), Susan Collins Susan Margaret

Clark added that “Senator Collins was encouraged by the President’s statements that he would give the FBI agents the latitude they need to do their work,” referring to another likely headache for McConnell, when President Donald Trump indicated during a freewheeling press conference Monday that he’s all for giving the FBI more leeway in their investigation.

This article was written by Kate Riga from Talking Points Memo and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Murkowski on Trump: I know Alaska 'better than he does' .
Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska is brushing back against President Donald Trump, saying she knows her state's political terrain "better than he does."Trump says voters "will never forgive" Murkowski for opposing Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court, and he says the senator will "never recover" politically.Murkowski, who isn't up for re-election until 2022, tells reporters that her "barometer is not necessarily what the president says but what the people of Alaska say."She acknowledges that some voters are disappointed in her decision, but says that's unavoidable because Alaskans were split on whether Kavanaugh should be co

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This is interesting!