Politics: GOP fractured over filling Supreme Court vacancies in 2020 - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

Politics GOP fractured over filling Supreme Court vacancies in 2020

14:55  11 october  2018
14:55  11 october  2018 Source:   thehill.com

$3 million raised for potential Collins 2020 challenger

  $3 million raised for potential Collins 2020 challenger A crowdfunding effort to raise money against Sen. Susan Collins's (R-Maine) potential 2020 opponent broke $3 million in contributions Friday. The campaign, organized by Be A Hero Team, Maine People's Alliance and Mainers for Accountable L eadership, was conditional on Collins's vote in the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, and after pledging her support for the nominee Friday the money will now go to her potential opponent. The campaign highlights threats to the people of Maine with Kavanaugh's confirmation.

Early lines of division are opening up among top Senate Republicans over a potential 2020 Supreme Court fight. Hatch sided with McConnell in the internal GOP debate, saying he believed Republicans would have to fill a vacancy , even if it occurred during the presidential election year.

Early lines of division are opening up among top Senate Republicans over a potential 2020 Supreme Court fight.

A police officer walks by columns on first day with newly sworn in Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh on the court at the Supreme Court in Washington, U.S., October 9, 2018.      REUTERS/Joshua Roberts© REUTERS/Joshua Roberts A police officer walks by columns on first day with newly sworn in Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh on the court at the Supreme Court in Washington, U.S., October 9, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts Early lines of division are opening up among top Senate Republicans over a potential 2020 Supreme Court fight.

Days after the Senate confirmed Brett Kavanaugh to the court, key GOP lawmakers are giving different answers over whether they'd fill a Supreme Court seat if there is an opening in 2020, the next presidential election year.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) refused to rule out taking up a nomination in 2020, even though Republicans blocked Merrick Garland, President Obama's nominee, from getting a hearing or a vote in the presidential election year of 2016.

Kavanaugh sworn in as Supreme Court justice

  Kavanaugh sworn in as Supreme Court justice The Latest on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh (all times local):6:20 p.m.Brett Kavanaugh has taken the oaths of office to become the 114th Supreme Court justice, just a couple of hours after the Senate voted 50-48 to confirm him.The quick swearing in enables Kavanaugh to begin work immediately in advance of arguments at the court Tuesday in two cases involving prison sentences for repeat offenders.The court says Kavanaugh took the oath required by the Constitution and another for judges that is part of federal law in the same room where the justices meet for their private conferences.The 53-year-old justice's wife, children and parents were in attendance.

GOP Fractured Over Filling Supreme Court Vacancies in 2020 , Hurricane Michael Left Path of Destruction, and it isn't Done Yet. You must be logged in as a Premium Member to access this content. << Back to Bill's Daily Briefing.

GOP Fractured Over Filling Supreme Court Vacancies in 2020 , Hurricane Michael Left Path of Destruction, and it isn't Done Yet. By: BillOReilly.com StaffOctober 11, 2018.

McConnell, suggesting 2020 could be different, pointed out that at the time the Senate and White House were controlled by different parties.

"You have to go back to 1880s to find the last time a Senate controlled by a party different from the president filled a vacancy on the Supreme Court that was created in the middle of a presidential election year," McConnell said on Fox News. "That's been the history."

Asked directly if he would allow a nominee to be confirmed in 2020, McConnell sidestepped the question, saying senators would wait and "see if there's a vacancy."

He reiterated his point to reporters in Louisville, Ky., on Monday and during an interview with the Associated Press Wednesday that was streamed live on Facebook.

Susan Rice considering 2020 challenge to Collins in Maine

  Susan Rice considering 2020 challenge to Collins in Maine President Barack Obama's national security adviser says she'll decide after next month's midterm elections whether to run for the Senate from Maine in 2020. Rice is weighing whether to try to unseat Republican Sen. Susan Collins, whose decision to support Brett Kavanaugh was key to his confirmation to the Supreme Court.

Expanding the Supreme Court would amount to a historic power play by the next Democratic An advocacy group launched in October called Pack the Courts is vying to make court reform a central In addition to winning over Senate veterans and moderates as well as House Democrats, any such

With two of the court ’s more liberal justices over 80 years old, there’s a chance in 2020 that McConnell could face the same situation he in 2016: still in control In bringing up how opposing parties generally don’t cooperate with presidents on Supreme Court vacancies in an election year, McConnell left

Two other Republicans took starkly different views from McConnell.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), fresh off the brutal Kavanaugh fight, told Fox News that if he is still committee chairman and there is a Supreme Court opening in 2020, the panel "won't take it up."

"Because I pledged that in 2016," Grassley told Fox News's Martha MacCallum. "That's a decision I made a long time ago."

Grassley hasn't said if he will remain chairman of the Judiciary Committee next year if Republicans keep control of the Senate. He could take over the Finance Committee, where current chairman Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) is retiring after 2018.

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), who attacked Judiciary Democrats with vitriol during Kavanaugh's final hearing, also said he would support putting off a Supreme Court confirmation if an opening occurs during the presidential primary season.

Lindsey Graham: Trump jokingly asked if he wanted to be attorney general

  Lindsey Graham: Trump jokingly asked if he wanted to be attorney general Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina told CNN on Tuesday that President Donald Trump asked him while they were playing golf over the weekend: "You wouldn't want to be attorney general, would you?" Graham, who's positioned himself as vocal Trump ally on Capitol Hill, said he responded: "No, I wouldn't give this up for anything.

The GOP did argue in 2016 that a Supreme Court vacancy shouldn't be filled until after voters had their say in the coming election, but their argument Grassley even said recently that, in his post atop the Judiciary Committee, he would advocate that any Supreme Court vacancies in 2020 (i.e. during

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley said if he’s still the head of the panel in 2020 , he won’t allow a Supreme Court vacancy to be filled that election year On Monday, he suggested that precedent doesn’t hold when a Republican is in the White House and the GOP controls the Senate.

"If an opening comes in the last year of President Trump's term, and the primary process has started, we'll wait until the next election," Graham, who would be in line to serve as Judiciary's chairman if Grassley steps aside and the GOP keeps its majority, said at a festival hosted by The Atlantic.

Lindsey Graham, Mitch McConnell are posing for a picture: GOP fractured over filling Supreme Court vacancies in 2020© Greg Nash GOP fractured over filling Supreme Court vacancies in 2020 Graham reiterated to CNN on Tuesday that he would be "inclined" once the 2020 primary season starts to delay a Supreme Court nominee until the next presidency.

A 2016 analysis of Supreme Court confirmations done by Josh Blackman, an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute and law professor at South Texas College of Law Houston, found that eight justices had been confirmed in a presidential election year from a vacancy that opened up during that same year, the last occurring in 1932.

Only two were confirmed by a Senate controlled by an opposing political party from the president, the last taking place in 1888 when a Republican Senate confirmed Melville Fuller, who was nominated by Democratic President Grover Cleveland.

Grassley: Judiciary Panel Won’t Consider Supreme Court Nominee for 2020 Vacancy

  Grassley: Judiciary Panel Won’t Consider Supreme Court Nominee for 2020 Vacancy Revealing a potentially contentious Republican chasm, Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley told Fox News on Tuesday night that if he still leads the committee in 2020 and a Supreme Court seat becomes vacant, the panel wouldThat could put the Iowa Republican at odds with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

help fill a high- court vacancy if one emerges when President Trump is up for reelection in 2020 . There’s no chance that an opposition party in control of the Senate is going to fill a Supreme Court In 2016, McConnell threw down the gauntlet shortly after Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) said on Sunday that he was open to the possibility of filling a vacancy in the Supreme Court in 2020 . "We will see if there's a vacancy in 2020 ," McConnell said. "But you're not ruling out the possibility since you're the Republican majority leader

Graham and Grassley would likely face intense pressure from McConnell and other conservatives to fill an opening to the court in 2020 if there is one. The conservative movement sees the appointments made by Trump and a GOP-controlled Senate as one of its greatest victories.

With the confirmations of Trump nominees Neil Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, conservatives believe they have shifted the high court to the right, potentially for decades to come.

Given the fact that three Supreme Court justices are at least 70 years old, it's entirely possible Trump could get a chance at a third nomination. Axios reported last year that Trump privately predicted he would be able to make four appointments to the court.

Hatch sided with McConnell in the internal GOP debate, saying he believed Republicans would have to fill a vacancy, even if it occurred during the presidential election year.

"I think we have to if we can. I'm for moving ahead no matter what," Hatch said.

Asked if it would appear "hypocritical" for Republicans to take up a nominee from Trump after they refused to move Garland's nomination, Hatch added that, "people would try to make that point but I'm not sure it works."

Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) told Fox News Radio that the Constitution didn't forbid them from confirming a Supreme Court nominee during an election year.

Grassley: Judiciary Panel Won’t Consider Supreme Court Nominee for 2020 Vacancy

  Grassley: Judiciary Panel Won’t Consider Supreme Court Nominee for 2020 Vacancy Live Coverage of Boston Red Sox @ New York Yankees Tuesday, October 9, 2018 on MSN Sports

In 2016, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) blocked the consideration of President Obama’s third nominee to the Supreme Court McConnell’s remarks were viewed as a signal that he would be open to filling a potential Supreme Court vacancy in 2020 . As chairman of the Judiciary

McConnell: GOP Senate Could Take Up a Supreme Court Nomination in 2020 . McConnell also said Saturday’s confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court is his proudest McConnell predicted that the House and Senate will soon wrap up talks over a bill creating a new process for

"I agree with Mitch McConnell's statement that this was a circumstance in which you had a Senate controlled by one party and a White House controlled by the other party. There's nothing written into the Constitution about that," said Lee, a member of the Judiciary Committee.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), the only Republican to oppose Kavanaugh, began shaking her head when asked about a potential 2020 Supreme Court fight. She added that she didn't know how to respond and that it was a "weird question."

GOP Sen. Jeff Flake (Ariz.), who is retiring after 2018, joked that he would leave the decision up to his colleagues. And Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas), the No. 2 Senate Republican, quipped: "Did somebody retire?"

"[McConnell] didn't speak to what would happen if they were the same party. But, obviously we don't have a Supreme Court nomination, so I'm not going to speculate or answer a hypothetical. ...When there's a vacancy I would be happy to talk," he said.

Sen. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.), a member of the Judiciary Committee, added that questions about a potential 2020 vacancy were "hypothetical" but indicated senators should give weight to Graham and Grassley's positions.

"I've heard from the current chair and the member who would be chair that they wouldn't take it up," Tillis said, referring to Grassley and Graham. "If we're really trying to restore some of the integrity of the Senate Judiciary Committee, I think there is something to be said to listening to ... the chair and the potential chair."

Democrats, for their part, aren't surprised that McConnell might have a change in heart if the opportunity arises to appoint a justice in 2020.

"He's prepared to break or change any rule even those that he swore he would uphold if it means getting another Republican on the federal court," said Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.).

With a laugh, he said that he was "not at all surprised" by McConnell's rhetoric.

EU top court tells Poland to suspend supreme court measure.
The European Union's top court ruled on Friday that Poland must immediately suspend politically-charged measures relating to the lowering of retirement age for supreme court judges. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); The ruling, which has the potential to further strain relations between the two, also obliges Poland to restitute to their jobs those Supreme Court judges who had been forced into retirement due to having reached or passed the age of 65.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!