Politics: Where the government’s climate report undercuts Trump’s rhetoric - PressFrom - US
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PoliticsWhere the government’s climate report undercuts Trump’s rhetoric

23:40  26 november  2018
23:40  26 november  2018 Source:   msn.com

U.S. report to detail costs of climate change as Trump downplays threat

U.S. report to detail costs of climate change as Trump downplays threat U.S. report to detail costs of climate change as Trump downplays threat

Trump claim about climate change: “I don’t know that it’ s man-made.” Climate report , p. 30: “[T]he unambiguous long-term warming trend in global average temperature over the last century cannot be explained by natural factors alone. Greenhouse gas emissions from human activities are the only

Play ABCNews.com. WATCH Government report contradicts Trump on climate change. Add Climate Change as an interest to stay up to date on the latest Sanders denounced the National Climate Assessment during a Tuesday press briefing, defending President Trump ' s publicly expressed doubt

Where the government’s climate report undercuts Trump’s rhetoric© Kevin Lamarque/Reuters President Trump refers to temperature change as he announces his decision to withdraw from the landmark Paris Climate Agreement, in the Rose Garden of the White House, June 1, 2017. (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)

One of President Trump’s broadest and longest-standing attempts to minimize the risk posed by the changing climate is to insist that the entire idea that the world is getting warmer has been so disproved that advocates had to rebrand “global warming” as “climate change."

This is not only not the case, but it’s an inversion of what happened. In 2002, Republican consultant Frank Luntz recommended that the White House of then-president George W. Bush drop “global warming” for “climate change.” He also encouraged the administration, under fire for abandoning a climate-related agreement shortly after taking office, to “continue to make the lack of scientific certainty [in climate change] a primary issue in the debate” to keep the public from accepting that climate change was occurring.

Ocasio-Cortez on climate change report: People will die if we don't act now

Ocasio-Cortez on climate change report: People will die if we don't act now Rep.-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) called on the U.S. to act "urgent[ly]" after a report from the federal government found that climate change is expected to have an enormous impact on the country in the near future. In a Twitter post, the New York Democrat reissued her call for a special House caucus on climate change, a demand that some progressive activists have called for in the wake of Democrats' takeover of the House. "People are going to die if we don't start addressing climate change ASAP," wrote Ocasio-Cortez on Friday following the report's release. "It's not enough to think it's 'important.' We must make it urgent.

Analysis: Where the government ’ s climate report undercuts Trump ’ s rhetorichttps Genius Trump thinks he knows more than anyone. King of narcissists! If the human race stopped ALL carbon emissions tomorrow, climate change would continue!

The administration tried to bury the assessment, but as residents flee wildfires and wade through flooded streets, let’ s hope decision-makers get the message.

Trump himself has seized on this idea, repeatedly arguing that there is some uncertainty about whether the climate is warming or, at other points, the role of humans in that warming. While he’s held nearly every possible position on the subject at one point or another, he seems, as president, to have settled into a dispassionate hand-waving about the reality of the situation.

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On Friday, while millions of Americans were burning off turkey by shopping, his administration released a report making it very clear that there was not only broad consensus on the reality of climate change but also on the cause and effects of it. The report, apparently unintentionally, offers fairly direct rebuttals to nearly every critique that Trump has offered in recent years.

Al Gore and Environmental Groups Accuse Trump of 'Burying' Climate Report With Black Friday Release

Al Gore and Environmental Groups Accuse Trump of 'Burying' Climate Report With Black Friday Release The federal government report was released without fanfare Friday, when many Americans headed to the stores for the Black Friday sales. Compiled as a result of collaboration by more than 300 federal government and independent scientists, the report warns that unchecked climate change will impact human health, safety, and cost the country hundreds of billions of dollars. The report was reviewed by 13 federal agencies.

Friday' s government report , detailing in stark terms the economic cost of climate change, is likely to be played down by the administration, even as WASHINGTON — The Trump White House, which has defined itself by a willingness to dismiss scientific findings and propose its own facts, on Friday

All the ways the climate report undercuts Trump ’ s rhetoric : The Post’ s Philip Bump has broken down the president’ s remarks on climate change and (with page citations), highlights where the report “apparently unintentionally, offers fairly direct rebuttals to nearly every critique that Trump has offered

(On Sunday, Luntz said that he wasn’t sure he’d still call himself a Republican, based in part on Trump’s “tone.”)

All page numbers below refer to the report’s summary document.

Trump claim: “I don’t necessarily agree” that human activity is the overwhelming cause of climate change.

Climate report, p. 24: “Earth’s climate is now changing faster than at any point in the history of modern civilization, primarily as a result of human activities. The impacts of global climate change are already being felt in the United States and are projected to intensify in the future—but the severity of future impacts will depend largely on actions taken to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt to the changes that will occur.”

Trump claim about climate change: “I don’t know that it’s man-made.”

Climate report, p. 30: “[T]he unambiguous long-term warming trend in global average temperature over the last century cannot be explained by natural factors alone. Greenhouse gas emissions from human activities are the only factors that can account for the observed warming over the last century; there are no credible alternative human or natural explanations supported by the observational evidence. Without human activities, the influence of natural factors alone would actually have had a slight cooling effect on global climate over the last 50 years.”

Trump dismisses findings of U.S. government report on climate change

Trump dismisses findings of U.S. government report on climate change U.S. President Donald Trump said on Monday he had read parts of a U.S. government report projecting that climate change will cost the country's economy billions of dollars by the end of the century, but he does not believe the economic impacts will be devastating. "I've seen it, I've read some of it, and it's fine," he told reporters at the White House. Asked about severe economic impacts, he said, "I don't believe it." Last year, Trump announced he would withdraw the United States from the 2015 Paris Deal to combat climate change.

Major Trump administration climate report says damages are ‘intensifying across the country': White House: Federal climate change U. S . President Donald Trump said on Monday he had read parts of a U. S . government report projecting that climate change will cost the country' s economy billions of

The government ’ s next update of the National Climate Assessment, she said, “gives us the opportunity to provide for a more transparent and data-driven process that includes fuller information on the range of potential scenarios and outcomes.” Trump last year announced his intention to withdraw

Trump claim: “I don’t believe the impact is merely what some say, and other scientists that dispute those findings very strongly."

Climate report, p. 32: “A key goal of scientific research is to increase our confidence and reduce the uncertainty in our understanding of the world around us. Even so, there is no expectation that uncertainty can be fully eliminated, just as we do not expect a perfectly accurate estimate for our drive time each day. ... While there is inherent uncertainty in climate science, there is high confidence in our understanding of the greenhouse effect and the knowledge that human activities are changing the climate in unprecedented ways. There is enough information to make decisions based on that understanding.”

Trump claim: “Brutal and Extended Cold Blast could shatter ALL RECORDS - Whatever happened to Global Warming?”

Climate report, p. 65: “Annual average temperature over the contiguous United States has increased by 1.2ºF (0.7°C) over the last few decades and by 1.8°F (1°C) relative to the beginning of the last century. Additional increases in annual average temperature of about 2.5°F (1.4°C) are expected over the next few decades regardless of future emissions, and increases ranging from 3°F to 12°F (1.6°–6.6°C) are expected by the end of century, depending on whether the world follows a higher or lower future scenario, with proportionally greater changes in high temperature extremes.”

White House: Federal climate change report 'not based on facts'

White House: Federal climate change report 'not based on facts' White House press secretary Sarah Sanders denounced a new climate-change report as "not data driven" and "not based on facts," sharpening the Trump administration's repudiation of the document crafted by 13 federal agencies. Sanders denounced the National Climate Assessment during a Tuesday press briefing, defending President Trump's publicly expressed doubt about its warning of potentially severe ocean-level rises and associated economic costs. "You have to look at the fact that this report is based on the most extreme modeled scenario, which contradicts long-established trends," Sanders said.

“This report will weaken the Trump administration’ s legal case for undoing climate change regulations, and it strengthens the hands of those who go to court to fight them,” said Michael Oppenheimer, a professor of geosciences and international affairs at Princeton.

His spelling and grammar are disastrous, he contradicts himself, trails into incoherence, never sounds dignified or recognisably presidential – but none of it does him any harm. In fact, it seems to help.

Where the government’s climate report undercuts Trump’s rhetoric© Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post (Fourth National Climate Assessment)

Trump claim about wildfires: “Maybe [climate change] contributes a little bit. The big problem we have is management.”

Climate report, pp. 99 and 150 : “Climatic changes, including warmer springs, longer summer dry seasons, and drier soils and vegetation, have already lengthened the wildfire season and increased the frequency of large wildfires. ... Analyses estimated that the area burned by wildfire across the western United States from 1984 to 2015 was twice what would have burned had climate change not occurred.”

Where the government’s climate report undercuts Trump’s rhetoric© Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post (Fourth National Climate Assessment)

Trump claim about melting glaciers: “You don’t know whether or not that would have happened with or without man.”

Climate report, p. 65: “In the Arctic, annual average temperatures have increased more than twice as fast as the global average, accompanied by thawing permafrost and loss of sea ice and glacier mass. Arctic-wide glacial and sea ice loss is expected to continue; by mid-century, it is very likely that the Arctic will be nearly free of sea ice in late summer.”

Trump claim: “Wind turbines are death to environment.”

Climate report, p. 51: “A growing number of states, cities, and businesses have pursued or expanded upon initiatives aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the scale of adaptation implementation across the country has increased. However, these efforts do not yet approach the scale needed to avoid substantial damages to the economy, environment, and human health expected over the coming decades. ... Many activities within the public and private sectors aim for or have the effect of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, such as the increasing use of natural gas in place of coal or the expansion of wind and solar energy to generate electricity.”

Patagonia Donates $10 Million Trump Tax Savings to Green Groups

Patagonia Donates $10 Million Trump Tax Savings to Green Groups Outdoor clothing company Patagonia Inc. has committed the $10 million it saved from federal tax cuts championed by President Donald Trump to nonprofit groups who work on conservation and climate issues, according to a LinkedIn post by Chief Executive Officer Rose Marcario. “Taxes protect the most vulnerable in our society, our public lands and other life-giving resources,” she wrote. “In spite of this, the Trump administration initiated a corporate tax cut, threatening these services at the expense of our planet.” The release last week of the fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment gave urgency to the decision, she wrote.

WASHINGTON — Directly contradicting much of the Trump administration’ s position on climate change, 13 federal agencies unveiled an exhaustive scientific report on Friday that says humans are the dominant cause of the global temperature rise that has created the warmest period in the history

Government rules intended to slow climate change are “making people’ s lives worse rather than better And the surest way for Mr. Trump to win cheers from coal crowds was to aim at an easy target: Mr A report produced by 14 federal agencies concluded that climate change was responsible for

Trump has regularly used the term “clean coal” to refer to coal generally. In climate terms, “clean coal” refers to a process by which the carbon dioxide released when coal is burned is captured and prevented from entering the atmosphere.

Trump claim: “Clean coal is a great thing. And it’s another source. It has to compete against natural gas. It has to compete against a lot of different things, including solar and including wind and including all of those things. Now, they’re much, much more expensive, as you know. They’re much, much more expensive. In fact, they need subsidy. And if you don’t give them subsidy — I don’t like energy that needs subsidy.”

Climate report, p. 71: “Low carbon-emitting natural gas generation has displaced coal generation due to the rising production of low-cost, unconventional natural gas, in part supported by federal investment in research and development. In the last 10 years, the share of generation from natural gas increased from 20% to over 30%, while coal has declined from nearly 50% to around 30%. Over this same time, generation from wind and solar has grown from less than 1% to over 5% due to a combination of technological progress, dramatic cost reductions, and federal and state policies.”

Trump claim: “What I’m not willing to do is sacrifice the economic well-being of our country for something that nobody really knows.”

Climate report, p. 13: “[T]he continued warming that is projected to occur without substantial and sustained reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions is expected to cause substantial net damage to the U.S. economy throughout this century, especially in the absence of increased adaptation efforts. With continued growth in emissions at historic rates, annual losses in some economic sectors are projected to reach hundreds of billions of dollars by the end of the century—more than the current gross domestic product (GDP) of many U.S. states.”

Departing for a campaign rally in Mississippi on Monday, Trump spoke with reporters about the report. Asked to respond to the claim that the economic effects would be devastating, Trump responded curtly.

“I don’t believe it.”

Leaders gather for key UN climate talks in Poland.
Leaders from around the world are arriving for the ceremonial opening of the climate conference in southern Poland that will discuss ways of curbing climate change. The two-week conference in Katowice is expected to work out how governments can report on their efforts to reduce green gas emission and keep global warming well below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), as agreed in 2015 in Paris. Host Poland will propose a declaration Monday for a "just transition" away from coal mining, the supplier of its main source of energy, to take into consideration the situation of people employed in the sector.

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