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PoliticsWhite House, Hill leaders unable to reach spending deal Tuesday

04:35  22 may  2019
04:35  22 may  2019 Source:   rollcall.com

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Negotiators were unable to reach an agreement on spending caps and the debt limit Tuesday , hours after a two-year deal seemed possible. House Budget Chairman John Yarmuth said Tuesday the White House has “been under a lot of pressure” from Senate GOP leaders to agree to a caps deal .

WASHINGTON — Negotiators were unable to reach an agreement on spending caps and the debt limit Tuesday , hours after a two-year deal seemed possible. “ Deals like this take time,” House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said after leaving an afternoon meeting between congressional leaders and

White House, Hill leaders unable to reach spending deal Tuesday© Provided by CQ Roll Call, Inc. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer agree that spending caps and debt limit legislation will go on the same bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Negotiators were unable to reach an agreement on spending caps and the debt limit Tuesday, hours after a two-year deal seemed possible.

“Deals like this take time,” House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said after leaving an afternoon meeting between congressional leaders and administration officials.

‘Big 4’ leaders to begin talks with White House on budget deal

‘Big 4’ leaders to begin talks with White House on budget deal Nancy Pelosi, Mitch McConnell, Chuck Schumer and Kevin McCarthy have agreed to begin negotiations.

Top congressional leaders from both parties will meet with senior White House officials this week as the Trump administration and Congress try once again to reach a deal to avoid tens of billions of dollars in automatic spending cuts this fall, according to congressional and administration officials.

“A Republican president occupies the White House , and Republicans hold the majority in both the House In a lengthy phone conversation, both men agreed to seek a permanent spending deal rather than If they can’t reach a new agreement before the next deadline, much of the federal government

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer said one of the biggest questions remaining was how to fund the “needs of the middle class on the domestic side.”

The developments came after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said a two-year budget deal to raise spending limits and possibly the debt ceiling could be reached as early as Tuesday.

If leaders had struck an agreement on the same day talks began, it would have broken with recent history. Two-year budget deals have typically been highly contentious affairs, requiring months of negotiation.

Congressional leaders and administration officials are likely to meet again soon to continue discussing spending levels and the debt limit, but that meeting won’t take place Tuesday, according to a Democratic aide.

Wall fight looms again as lawmakers prep for budget talks

Wall fight looms again as lawmakers prep for budget talks The House, Senate, and White House are poised to begin talks next week on a budget deal and raising the debt ceiling, but an accord on 2020 spending could be hobbled once again by a fight over border wall funding. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); “You ask me where this thing is going to fall apart again, it’s over the wall,” Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said.

The White House and congressional leaders have struck a budget deal that would suspend the debt limit until mid-2021, President Donald Trump and The deal came several hours after a source close to the talks told NBC News that Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Pelosi, D-Calif., were close

WASHINGTON — Senate leaders struck a far- reaching bipartisan agreement on Wednesday that would add hundreds of billions of dollars to military and domestic programs over the next two years while raising the federal debt limit, moving to end the cycle of fiscal showdowns that have roiled the

McConnell’s statement early Tuesday afternoon came after a closed-door, two-hour meeting between top White House officials and the top four congressional leaders of both parties.

“The agreement would be a two-year caps deal, which would allow us to go forward with some semblance, at least, of a regular appropriations process,” McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, told reporters.

Action on the debt limit, which was reinstated in March, would also likely be part of any deal, McConnell said.

Schumer didn’t want to put a similar timetable on the negotiations as his GOP counterpart had indicated. “There are still some significant issues outstanding, particularly the domestic spending side issues,” the New York Democrat said earlier Tuesday. “But we’re having good discussions.”

If no deal is reached, spending limits imposed under a 2011 deficit reduction law would require cutting discretionary spending by about 10 percent, or $125 billion, in the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1. In fiscal 2021, the final year of the automatic reductions — known as a sequester — spending caps would rise only 2 percent above the 2020 lows.

Trump blow up leaves lawmakers worried about disaster aid, budget talks

Trump blow up leaves lawmakers worried about disaster aid, budget talks President Donald Trump's angry threats Wednesday to not work with congressional Democrats until they stopped investigating him came at a sensitive time for talks over several important issues that bipartisan negotiators on Capitol Hill and the White House had hoped to wrap up before Congress leaves as early as Thursday for the Memorial Day recess. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

A key White House meeting between President Donald Trump and top congressional leaders produced no viable compromise Wednesday as No shutdown deal progress following White House meeting. White House and Hill sources described the Wednesday session as "frank" and "civil" — as

The House passed a stopgap bill Tuesday to prevent another government shutdown, as a broader budget deal appeared increasingly within reach on Capitol Hill . The House Freedom Caucus voted Monday night to band together in support of House GOP leadership ’s spending plan.

House Budget Chairman John Yarmuth said Tuesday the White House has “been under a lot of pressure” from Senate GOP leaders to agree to a caps deal. The Kentucky Democrat expects the deal will “resemble” the fiscal 2020 spending limits the House is operating under — $733 billion for defense and $639 billion for nondefense, including Overseas Contingency Operations funds.

Yarmuth said he thinks Senate Republicans are comfortable at least with $733 billion for defense, though the Trump administration is seeking $750 billion.

In addition to McConnell, Schumer, McCarthy and Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the group of officials meeting Tuesday included Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney and acting Office of Management and Budget Director Russell Vought.

“Everybody’s looking to get a two-year agreement. We had progress today, and we’ll continue going forward,” McCarthy told reporters after the group met earlier Tuesday.

Negotiators also have to resolve how to handle the debt limit, which was reinstated March 2 but which Congress may not have to address until the fall because of tax revenue inflows and accounting tricks Treasury can employ.

Democrats have pressed to attach debt limit legislation to a spending caps deal, but the White House has sought to keep the two issues separate.

For now, it appears McConnell and Schumer agree that spending caps and debt limit legislation would go on the same bill.

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