Politics: Trump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom - PressFrom - US
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PoliticsTrump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom

15:35  25 may  2019
15:35  25 may  2019 Source:   washingtonpost.com

Trump to visit South Korea amid stalled talks with the North

Trump to visit South Korea amid stalled talks with the North President Donald Trump will visit South Korea next month amid questions about his stalled nuclear talks with Kim Jong Un. The White House said Wednesday Trump would make the stop as part of a trip to Asia to attend the G20 summit in Japan. In South Korea, Trump will meet with his counterpart Moon Jae-in, who has encouraged his talks with Kim in an effort to tamp down tensions on the Korean peninsula. "President Trump and President Moon will continue their close coordination on efforts to achieve the final, fully verified denuclearization of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea," the White House said.

TOKYO — In announcing his decision to exit the Iran nuclear accord , President Trump said he also wanted to send a signal about the kind of hard bargain he plans to drive with another longtime American adversary, North Korea .

Japan and South Korea in particular, whose relations have recently deteriorated over longstanding historical South Korea , meanwhile, lobbied for an exemption to the tariffs, citing the importance of the alliance. The envoys who visited the White House to brief Mr. Trump on their meeting with Mr. Kim

TOKYO — President Trump landed in Japan on Saturday to begin a four-day state visit high on pomp and ceremony meant to underline the strength of the alliance between the two nations.

The trip, with Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe playing host, has been tailor made to flatter Trump’s ego, with the U.S. president to become the first foreign leader to meet new Emperor Naruhito since he ascended the Chrysanthemum Throne at the beginning of May.

North Korean missile test violated U.N. resolution, says Bolton

North Korean missile test violated U.N. resolution, says Bolton U.S. President Donald Trump's national security adviser, John Bolton, said on Saturday there was "no doubt" North Korea's recent test missile launches violated United Nations resolutions.

Nor has North Korea responded to Trump ’s vow, in remarks to reporters Thursday, that he is “totally prepared to walk away” from his talks with Kim, unlike North Korea ’s overall nuclear program is more advanced and more widespread. It is also believed to be partly hidden underground, making it harder

As he prepares for possible talks with the North Korean leader Kim Jong-un about controlling the North ’s nuclear weapons program, President Trump is facing his most complicated national security challenge so far.

“We just spent many, many hours on the plane,” Trump said Saturday evening to a gathering of several dozen Japanese business executives at the U.S. ambassador’s residence here — where he headed as soon as Air Force One touched down at Haneda Airport. “We just walked off the plane and here we are.”

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But there are also a whole set of serious and even contentious issues playing around the periphery, from Trump’s determination to get a better deal on trade with Japan and convince it to pay more for the U.S. military presence here, to deadlock with North Korea and rapidly rising tensions with Iran.

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President Trump made an announcement from the White House, keeping his campaign promise, that the United States would withdraw from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, also known as the Iran nuclear deal. John Fritze reports. John Fritze, USA TODAY.

President’s nuclear ambitions could see him win a Nobel prize, or create new conflicts.

On Saturday, Trump’s national security adviser, John Bolton, said North Korea had clearly violated U.N. Security Council resolutions by testing short-range ballistic missiles earlier this month, and said Trump and Abe would underline the importance of maintaining the “integrity” of those sanctions resolutions.

He also said North Korea had not responded to attempts by the United States and South Korea to restart talks after the breakdown of a summit between Trump and Kim Jong Un in Hanoi in February.

But if Trump’s North Korea policy is in some disarray, he will at least find a friendly ear in Abe.

More sensitive could be the issue of Iran, after Trump announced Friday he would be sending an additional 1,500 troops to the Middle East to counter what the administration says are increased threats from the Islamic Republic.

Trump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom© REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY U.S. President Donald Trump shouts an answer to a reporter’s question on the tarmac after arriving aboard Air Force One during a refueling stop on his way to Japan at Joint Base Elmendorf, Alaska, U.S. May 24, 2019. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY Japan has long-standing diplomatic and cultural ties to Iran, and opposed the U.S. decision to pull out of the Iran nuclear agreement negotiated by President Barack Obama. On Saturday, Japanese media said a plan was being drawn up for Abe to visit Iran in June to meet President Hassan Rouhani in an attempt to mediate, and this was something Japan’s leader would discuss with Trump.

Trump 'personally thinks lots of good things will come from North Korea'

Trump 'personally thinks lots of good things will come from North Korea' President Trump on Monday morning said he "personally thinks lots of good things will come from North Korea" following a meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); "I personally think lots of good things will come with North Korea. I may be right. I may be wrong," Trump told reporters after he and Abe spoke for about 17 minutes with translators in Tokyo. "There's good respect built between the U.S. and North Korea. We'll see what happens.

Mr Trump has previously exchanged some fiery rhetoric with North Korea over its ballistic missile tests but aides said earlier this week that he would not go to the heavily fortified demilitarised zone (DMZ) on the border between the South and North . He is, however, to visit Camp Humphreys, a US military

Trump declared victory, but the North Koreans have neither taken steps toward denuclearization nor committed to do so. Also , despite what Trump may hope, there won’t even be a Gulf version of the Singapore summit: a made-for-TV drama that lowers hostilities without addressing underlying problems.

It follows a visit to Japan by Iran Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif earlier this month.

Abe, who first visited Iran with his father in 1983, has maintained close ties with the Iranian leadership since becoming prime minister. The two countries signed an investment agreement in 2016, and are celebrating 90 years of diplomatic engagement this year.

Akihisa Nagashima, an independent politician and former national security expert, welcomed the news that Abe could be trying to mediate.

“A remarkable face-saving mission,” he tweeted. “This is the ‘realistic solution’ that could save both the face of President Trump who is finding it hard to deal with Bolton’s hard stance and that of the Prime Minister who’s having difficulty in Japan’s relationship with Russia and North Korea.

“Suddenly, the Japan-U. S. summit, which was seen as having no diplomatic agenda, carries meaning. This is what we call quiet diplomacy.”

Bolton declined to comment Saturday when asked about possible Japanese mediation, except to say the two leaders will “certainly discuss Iran.”

US 'not looking for regime change' in Iran: Trump

US 'not looking for regime change' in Iran: Trump The United States is not seeking regime change in Iran, President Donald Trump said Monday, as tensions between the two countries rise with Washington deploying troops to the region. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); "I know so many people from Iran, these are great people, it has a chance to be a great country, with the same leadership," Trump said at a press conference in Tokyo where he is on a state visit. "We're not looking for regime change, I just want to make that clear.

Now President Trump also plans to press the cause, meeting during a visit to Japan starting Sunday with several of the affected families The North Korean government released five abductees in 2002 after Junichiro Koizumi, then Japan ’s prime minister, went to Pyongyang for a summit meeting.

Trump also repeated that he and the secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, had “a very good relationship”. Tillerson has been the target of criticism from the president about his attempts to talk to North Korea and to engage China to rein in Pyongyang. Tillerson could be tougher, Trump said.

He repeated U.S. accusations that “Iran and its proxies” were behind a series of violent attacks in recent weeks, including on oil tankers and pipelines, adding that the administration is “very concerned about this level of very dangerous behavior by the Iranian regime.”

“The way to preserve peace, the way to prevent Iran from taking belligerent steps, is to have a strong American presence in the region,” Bolton said.

There are also bilateral issues on the agenda. Shortly before leaving, Trump tweeted, “I will also be discussing Trade and Military with my friend, Prime Minister @AbeShinzo.”

Trump has threatened to impose 25 percent tariffs on foreign cars, a measure that would have a serious impact on Japan’s economy, although he recently announced that measure would be delayed 180 days to allow for talks on ways to restrict import volumes. He also wants Japan to cut agricultural tariffs.

Trump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom
Trump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom
Trump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom
Trump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom
Trump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom
Trump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom
Trump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom
Trump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom
Trump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom
Trump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom
Trump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom
Trump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom
Trump arrives for ceremonial visit to Japan, but Iran and North Korea also loom
Speaking at the residence of William Hagerty, the U.S. ambassador to Japan, Trump said the United States and Japan were working to negotiate a bilateral trade agreement, but noted what he said was an imbalance between the two countries.

“I would say that Japan has had a substantial edge for many, many years, but that’s okay,” he said. “Maybe that’s why you like us so much.”

Japan’s decision to push ahead with the Trans Pacific Partnership, an 11-nation trade deal, and also its success in agreeing to a separate deal with the European Union, has resulted in promises to cut agricultural tariffs for a whole swath of countries.

But because Trump withdrew from the TPP, the United States is not one of them, and U.S. pork, wheat and barley exporters are already reported to be under pressure.

Trump is also keen to get Japan to pay more of the cost of stationing U.S. troops in the country, although Tokyo says it already covers most of the costs and a higher proportion than other host nations: bringing the troops back home would be more expensive, it says.

Trump Undercuts John Bolton on North Korea and Iran

Trump Undercuts John Bolton on North Korea and Iran President Trump publicly undercut John R. Bolton, his national security adviser, on Iran and North Korea in recent days, raising questions about the administration’s policy and personnel in the middle of confrontations with both long-term American adversaries. 

TOKYO — North Korea ’s declaration at the end of the Winter Olympics of its willingness to start a dialogue with the United States offered a sliver of optimism that the political pageantry of the Games would lead to more substantial results.

President Trump is now fully engaged in two nuclear confrontations, one with Iran over a nuclear accord he finds an “embarrassment” and the other with North Korea that is forcing the Pentagon to contemplate for the first time in decades what a resumption of the Korean War might look like.

Trump will also be the guest of honor at the finals of a sumo tournament Sunday and present a cup to the winner. The cup, which will be called the “President’s Cup,” is approximately four-and-a-half feet high and between 60 and 70 pounds, and features an eagle on the top, a senior White House Official said. The president viewed photos of the cup before he departed for Japan, the official added.

On Tuesday he will tour a Japanese aircraft carrier, a flat-top that already carries helicopters but is being converted to carry U.S. short takeoff and vertical landing F-35B fighter jets. The stop is designed to underline Japan’s willingness to help defend itself but also to purchase American military hardware when doing so.

Trump has already boasted of the great honor of the “very big event,” he is attending, “something that hasn’t happened in over 200 years,” even if he does appear slightly fuzzy on the details.

For the record, the abdication of Naruhito’s father, Emperor Emeritus Akihito, marked the first time a living emperor had stood down in more than two centuries, but the only historic event Trump will attend will be a formal banquet with the new emperor.

Japan’s prime minister has invested a huge amount of time and attention maintaining a close relationship with Trump. The pair have spoken by telephone or met in person more than 40 times since late 2016. The summit will be the second of three meetings in three months, with Abe visiting Washington in April and Trump due back in Japan for the G-20 meeting next month.

On Saturday night, Trump said the U.S.-Japanese relationship has “never been stronger, never been more powerful, never been closer.”

Hagerty, introducing Trump, instructed the business leaders to open a small gift — a glass tumbler — and urged them to use it after the president’s departure “to step outside and celebrate with a small afterglow, and celebrate the arrival of the president of the United States for the first state visit of the Reiwa era.”

Akiko Kashiwagi contributed to this report.

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Bolton Says Iran Is Likely Responsible for Oil Tanker Attacks.
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