Politics: John McCain Recited Names Of Dictators During Trump Inaugural, Senator Says - PressFrom - US
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PoliticsJohn McCain Recited Names Of Dictators During Trump Inaugural, Senator Says

05:40  26 may  2019
05:40  26 may  2019 Source:   huffingtonpost.com

Meghan McCain to Sen. Klobuchar: Leave my father out of it

Meghan McCain to Sen. Klobuchar: Leave my father out of it The Democratic presidential contender used a personal anecdote about the late Arizona GOP senator criticizing Trump.

John S. McCain , the proud naval aviator who climbed from depths of despair as a prisoner of war in Vietnam to pinnacles of power as a Republican congressman and senator from Arizona and a two-time contender for the presidency, died on Saturday at his home in Arizona. He was 81.

But Trump said , “I like people who weren’t captured.” Trump avoided service in the military. McCain , a Navy pilot during the Vietnam War, was shot down Meghan McCain , the senator ’s talk show host daughter, indicated earlier this year that the White House has offered her family private apologies for

John McCain Recited Names Of Dictators During Trump Inaugural, Senator Says© Joe Raedle via Getty Images Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) takes a selfie with Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.), along with the late Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), during President Donald Trump's inaugural address in 2017.

DES MOINES, Iowa – Sen. John McCain repeatedly compared President Donald Trump to a dictator during the president’s inaugural address, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a candidate for the 2020 Democratic nomination and friend of the now-deceased Arizonan, told a crowd of voters here.

Klobuchar, speaking to a crowd of more than 200 at Jasper’s Winery, said she sat next to McCain, one of Trump’s most outspoken Republican critics, and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) during the inaugural address, which became known for its blunt expression of Trump’s authoritarian populism and invocations of “American carnage.”

Amy Klobuchar says she has 'deep respect' for McCain family

Amy Klobuchar says she has 'deep respect' for McCain family Sen. Amy Klobuchar's campaign responded after Meghan McCain asked the 2020 Democratic candidate to keep her father out of presidential politics. "Senator Klobuchar had a long time friendship with Senator McCain, she has defended him against President Trump's attacks in the past, and she has deep respect for his family," Klobuchar's communications director, Tim Hogan, said in a statement Monday night. "While she was simply sharing a memory, she continues to believe that the best stories about Senator McCain are not about the views he had about President Trump: they're about McCain's own valor and heroism.

WASHINGTON — As leaders of both political parties and foreign dignitaries publicly mourned John McCain on Sunday, President Trump conspicuously avoided a national moment of tribute to a senator whose death seemed to be its own metaphor for the demise of civility and unity in the Trump era.

Despite ‘hating the press’, Republican senator says media is necessary after president calls media ‘the enemy of the American people’.

“I sat on that stage between Bernie and John McCain, and John McCain kept reciting to me names of dictators during that speech because he knew more than any of us what we were facing as a nation,” she said. “He understood it. He knew because he knew this man more than any of us did.”

McCain and Trump feuded frequently during the president’s first 18 months in office, and Trump has continued to attack McCain since the senator’s death in August of 2018. McCain refused to endorse Trump during the campaign, and later attacked his approach to politics as a “half-baked, spurious nationalism cooked up by people who would rather find scapegoats than solve problems.”

Trump, for his part, attacked McCain for his vote to kill an Obamacare repeal bill in the Senate and famously criticized him for being captured while serving as a fighter pilot in Vietnam. “I like people who weren’t captured,” he said during his run for president.

White House asked for USS John McCain to be 'out of sight' during Trump's visit to Japan: WSJ

White House asked for USS John McCain to be 'out of sight' during Trump's visit to Japan: WSJ Ahead of President Trump's visit to Japan over the weekend, the White House asked the U.S. Navy to make sure a warship named for late Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) would be "out of sight," according to an email obtained by The Wall Street Journal. The email, dated May 15, included an outline of plans for the president's arrival, including instructions for the ship. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); "USS John McCain needs to be out of sight," the email reportedly read. "Please confirm #3 will be satisfied.

Senator John McCain , Republican of Arizona, has often criticized the Trump administration.CreditCreditAl Drago/The New York Times. “The principles that Senator McCain has espoused have animated American foreign policy for decades,” said Richard Fontaine, a former

John McCain did not end with the Arizona Republican’s death. As a week of mourning began for the longtime senator and Vietnam War hero, the president Trump received five deferments during the War. Four while he was attending college and one after a doctor diagnosed him with bone spurs in his

McCain has faced some criticism from Democrats for not doing more to oppose the policies and appointments of a president he frequently lambasted, but Klobuchar and other Democratic senators frequently praise him as a Republican they were able to work with in an increasingly partisan Senate. Klobuchar regularly mentions her friendship with McCain during her stump speech.

This article originally appeared on HuffPost.

Mulvaney: Attempt to move USS John McCain during Trump visit 'not unusual'.
Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney said Sunday that it wasn't "unreasonable" for an administration staffer to ask that the USS McCain be hidden during President Trump's Japan visit last week. Mulvaney said on NBC's "Meet the Press" that he believes it was a "probably somebody in the advance team" who told the Navy to hide the ship based on the president's thoughts over the late senator. "The president's feelings toward the former senator are well known," Mulvaney said, adding that firing someone over the request "is silly.

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