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PoliticsJoe Biden says decreasing access to abortion services changed his view on federal funding

07:10  12 june  2019
07:10  12 june  2019 Source:   usatoday.com

Biden’s First Run for President Was a Calamity. Some Missteps Still Resonate.

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Joe Biden says decreasing access to abortion services changed his view on federal funding . When asked about why taxpayers who feel morally that their money should not go towards funding abortions , Biden said that it was "impossible" to provide universal care without providing abortion

You're viewing YouTube in Russian. You can change this preference below. After coming under fire from Democrats for his stance, Biden announced the next day that he could no longer Read more: Joe Biden says decreasing access to abortion services changed his view on federal funding

Joe Biden says decreasing access to abortion services changed his view on federal funding© Zach Boyden-Holmes/The Register Former Vice President Joe Biden campaigns in a packed room at Iowa Wesleyan University in Mount Pleasant, Iowa Tuesday, June 11, 2019.

MOUNT PLEASANT, Ia. — Former Vice President Joe Biden, one of more than 20 candidates running for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, said Tuesday he changed his view on federal funding for most abortion procedures after the closing of abortion-providing clinics in the South.

"I still believe if there were, in fact, a means by which poor women would be able to access their constitutional right and it was able to be paid for without taxpayers' money, it should be done," Biden told reporters in Mount Pleasant.

Biden 'misheard' ACLU activist's question about Hyde Amendment: campaign

Biden 'misheard' ACLU activist's question about Hyde Amendment: campaign Former Vice President Joe Biden's campaign said on Wednesday that the 2020 frontrunner "misheard" a question that effectively fed speculation that he flip-flopped on his support for the Hyde Amendment, a law blocking federal funding for abortion. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); According to his campaign, Biden thought the woman was asking about the Mexico City policy -- a ban, revived by President Trump's administration, on international aid for groups that either promote or provide abortions.

Mr. Biden had been one of only a few Democratic politicians who supported the amendment, which bans most federal funding for abortion . Joseph R. Biden Jr., the presumed front-runner for the Democratic nomination, denounced his past support of the Hyde Amendment, saying he could not

Joe Biden says decreasing access to abortion services changed his view on federal funding . The former vice president and 2020 candidate said in Iowa it would be "impossible" to provide universal care without providing abortion services .

But there are fewer options than prior years for low-income women to access abortions because of funding cuts and "attacks on Roe v. Wade," Biden said, which is why he now disapproves of the Hyde Amendment. Passed in 1976, the amendment bans the use of federal funds to pay for abortions in most cases. Biden previously supported the measure but recently reversed his stance.

"The elimination of access to clinics in all those southern states — a number of them have one or no clinics, so that's the reason I changed my position," he said.

Biden said he reached the decision while finalizing his campaign's health care platform and did not consult anyone about his views on the Hyde Amendment.

"I made a commitment that I would not ever attempt to impose my religious views on anyone else in terms of relations to this most unique question in all of humanity: When does human life begin? When does that occur?" he said. "So, I'm not going to do that."

Behind Biden’s Reversal on Hyde Amendment: Lobbying, Backlash and an Ally’s Call

Behind Biden’s Reversal on Hyde Amendment: Lobbying, Backlash and an Ally’s Call Joe Biden's sudden turnaround illustrates his larger challenge as he runs for president for a third time.

Joe Biden faced a backlash over his support for the measure, which advocates say disproportionately harms poor women and women of color. The statement went on to say that “given the current draconian attempts to limit access to abortion , if avenues for women to access their protected rights

Former Vice President Joe Biden says he now wants to throw out the Hyde Amendment, dropping his long-held support for the measure that blocks federal funds from being used for most abortions amid criticism from his 2020 Democratic rivals.

When asked about why taxpayers who feel morally that their money should not go towards funding abortions, Biden said that it was "impossible" to provide universal care without providing abortion services in a health care program.

"Look, it's a constitutional right, and it can't be denied," Biden said. "When there was an alternative, it made sense. But there's virtually no alternative."

This article originally appeared on Des Moines Register: Joe Biden says decreasing access to abortion services changed his view on federal funding

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Black voters make up more than 60 percent of the Democratic electorate in South Carolina, and are key to a primary victory. Several African American South Carolina lawmakers and Democratic operatives told USA TODAY that the episode has spurred a debate about whether Biden is in touch with the black voters he’s trying to court. State Rep. J.A. Moore, a lawmaker from North Charleston who has endorsed Sen. Kamala Harris, said that Biden’s remarks about Eastland and Talmadge adds another layer of skepticism about the impact that the former vice president’s long political career has had on African Americans.

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