Politics: For Trump, a Time of Indecision - PressFrom - US
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Politics For Trump, a Time of Indecision

06:00  20 september  2019
06:00  20 september  2019 Source:   nytimes.com

Trump says Pompeo not under consideration to replace Bolton

Trump says Pompeo not under consideration to replace Bolton President Trump on Thursday said he does not plan to make Secretary of State Mike Pompeo his national security adviser. © UPI Photo Trump says Pompeo not under consideration to replace Bolton The president told reporters as he left to attend a GOP House retreat in Baltimore that he spoke with Pompeo earlier in the day, and that the secretary of State "liked the idea of somebody [else] in there." "I think he is fantastic," Trump said of Pompeo. Reports circulated this week that Trump may consider appointing Pompeo to replace former national security adviser John Bolton, who he fired on Tuesday.

WASHINGTON — Speaking to a Fox News reporter near the Mexican border on Wednesday, President Trump seemed taken aback when asked if the White House were preparing to roll out gun control proposals the next day, a timeline administration officials had suggested was likely.

Despite all the forces arrayed against Mr. Trump , a paralytic sense of indecision and despair has prevailed. Some establishment Republicans have been scrambling for a way to prevent him from becoming the party’s presidential nominee.CreditCreditDamon Winter/The New York Times .

WASHINGTON — Speaking to a Fox News reporter near the Mexican border on Wednesday, President Trump seemed taken aback when asked if the White House were preparing to roll out gun control proposals the next day, a timeline administration officials had suggested was likely.

a man wearing a suit and tie standing in front of a door: Almost two months after back-to-back mass shootings in Texas and Ohio, President Trump has not moved forward with gun violence legislation.© Erin Schaff/The New York Times Almost two months after back-to-back mass shootings in Texas and Ohio, President Trump has not moved forward with gun violence legislation.

“No, we’re not moving on anything,” Mr. Trump said. “We’re going very slowly in one way because we want to make sure it’s right.”

The result is that almost two months after the back-to-back mass shootings in El Paso and in Dayton, Ohio, when Mr. Trump said he wanted to pass “very meaningful background checks,” warnings from gun rights advocates and Republican lawmakers about the political blowback that would result from doing that have led to indecision about what to do and what the time frame is for sharing it.

Trump vows to protect 2nd Amendment after gun briefing

Trump vows to protect 2nd Amendment after gun briefing WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is vowing to fully protect the Second Amendment after huddling with top aides to discuss gun control measures. Trump insists "a lot of progress" was made on background checks "and various things having to do with guns" during Thursday's discussion. But he's also making clear that he's weary of angering gun proponents, suggesting Democrats' push for new gun control measures following a summer of mass shootings could be "a ploy" to take Americans' "guns away." Trump was briefed Thursday on a list of potential measures, including boosting mental health assistance and expediting executions for mass killers.

President Donald Trump has threatened to pull out of NAFTA, the Paris climate agreement and the Iranian nuclear deal — unless he opts to stay. He decided to revoke legal protections for the Dreamers, then urged Congress hours later to enact new ones.

Mr Trump can exceed expectations just by not insulting lots of people or losing his temper. Interviewing him is like trying to catch fish in a Besides, at a time when Americans are sick of politicians, Mrs Clinton is a near-perfect avatar for all the things they do not like about politics (see article).

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But idling in neutral is not something the president is doing only on guns. In discussions with his staff, Mr. Trump has made clear he wants to accomplish something big, but seems stymied as to what it might be, according to interviews with a half-dozen aides and advisers. In the meantime, he has remained on the sidelines as divisive issues are debated and is treading water even on possible staff changes he wants to make, for fear of how things “play.”

On the international stage, Mr. Trump has seemed most conflicted about how to respond to Iran’s attack on oil facilities in Saudi Arabia, threatening to order “the ultimate option” one moment, and then warning that getting involved in Middle East wars was a mistake the next.

New York Giants: Eli Manning deserved better than team's benching

New York Giants: Eli Manning deserved better than team's benching Eli Manning's run with the Giants might be over after the long-time starter lost his job to rookie Daniel Jones. But New York never had a clear plan.

President Donald Trump had about three times as much free time planned for last Tuesday as work time , according to his private schedule. For Trump aides, scheduling presented a challenge from the outset. Accustomed to conducting business largely over the phone from his office in Trump Tower

“And that makes Trump look at that and panic more and react more and it’s kind of a cycle that continues in that way.” Appearing on CNN's New Day, New York Times White House correspondent Maggie Haberman appeared somewhat stunned by Donald Trump 's continuing insistence that he was

And the lack of direction is apparent even in the message he delivers at his campaign rallies. With little in the way of policy proposals or a larger vision, he has been telling crowds from New Hampshire to South Carolina, “You have no choice but to vote for me,” and has been promoting his new slogan, “Keep America Great.”

On guns, Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, has made it clear he will not take any action until the White House does. “If the president is in favor of a number of things that he has discussed openly and publicly, and I know that if we pass it, it will become law, I’ll put it on the floor,” he said this month.

For Mr. Trump, who has been under pressure to act but appears to be aware that any decision he makes comes loaded with its own political risk, part of the holdup is division within his own administration.

Mr. Trump said he would pass “very meaningful background checks” after the mass shooting last month in El Paso.© Tamir Kalifa for The New York Times Mr. Trump said he would pass “very meaningful background checks” after the mass shooting last month in El Paso.

When William P. Barr, the attorney general, and Eric Ueland, the White House legislative director, met with Republican lawmakers on Wednesday, distributing a plan to expand background checks, he did so with the blessing of the White House, according to people briefed on what took place. But White House communications officials immediately distanced the president from what they described as a “test run” on a proposal they expected would meet resistance and ultimately convinced Mr. Barr, who some Trump aides view as overly aggressive that the plan was a nonstarter.

Trump sues Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance over attempt to get tax returns

Trump sues Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance over attempt to get tax returns "We have filed a lawsuit this morning in Federal Court on behalf of the President in order to address the significant constitutional issues at stake," Trump's attorney Jay Sekulow said.

Comedy Central's Indecision 2008 was the special coverage of the United States presidential election provided by several programs on the Comedy Central network.

A TIME analysis of county-level results show stunning shifts in Trump ’s favor through the upper Midwest and Northeast, demonstrating the success of The one exception: the mountain states, where growing Hispanic populations and Mormon distaste for Trump provided some of the sharpest swings

“The president has not signed off on anything yet,” said Hogan Gidley, a White House spokesman. Of the plan that was being distributed by a White House staff member and a senior administration official, he said, “This is not a White House document, and any suggestion to the contrary is completely false.”

Mr. Trump also appears to be tempering his aggressive vows to impose a ban on all flavored vaping products. In an announcement last week in the Oval Office, with the first lady, Melania Trump, by his side, Mr. Trump declared that “we can’t allow people to get sick, and we can’t have our youth be so affected.”

But days afterward, Mr. Trump sent out a tweet that raised questions about his commitment to a ban that his administration is forging ahead with. “Let’s get counterfeits off the market, and keep young children from Vaping!” Mr. Trump wrote, making the implicit argument that vaping was a good alternative to cigarettes and shifting the focus to counterfeit products.

The tweet, Mr. Trump has told aides, came after a discussion with his campaign manager, Brad Parscale, who warned him that the ban was going to be received poorly by his conservative supporters. On Thursday, the White House scheduled and then abruptly postponed a meeting with conservatives concerned about the vaping ban. One person briefed on the process said the agencies that would impose such a ban were still reviewing how to go about it.

Trump threatens to release IS captives at European borders

  Trump threatens to release IS captives at European borders US President Donald Trump threatened on Friday to release Islamic State prisoners at European borders if France, Germany and other countries don't take back their captured nationals. "I defeated the Caliphate," Trump told reporters in the Oval Office during a meeting with Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

While Trump ’s misogyny certainly isn’t new, his comments on the most hot-button social issue in the country succeeded where millions of dollars of anti- Trump spending failed: by unifying the right and the left against his candidacy. Opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the views of TIME editors.

But while she said she vehemently disagreed with Trump when that happened, she still thought that he was "a million times better than Hillary." The 2016 convention is her second time serving as a delegate, with her first delegate experience in 2012 when Mitt Romney won the GOP nomination.

Still, to the president’s critics, Mr. Trump’s apparent paralysis on policy issues like guns is indicative of a larger problem in his administration.

“It requires stepping out of entertainment frame and into a political leadership frame,” said Peter Ambler, the executive director of Giffords, an organization tackling gun violence. “He’s not strong enough to forge any sort of compromise that would get anything less than full support from his base. He does not have that degree of political power or savvy, and that’s why he ends up in a perpetual ‘Infrastructure Week.’”

Mr. Trump’s defenders said he was no different from his predecessors, who also found themselves stalled at times in their presidencies. But some political analysts said Mr. Trump’s situation was different.

“There are a lot of balls in the air here, and it’s not quite clear how he’s going to catch them, or where they’re going to land,” said David Axelrod, a former top adviser to President Barack Obama. “On some things, he has strong opinions, but on many things, he doesn’t. If you don’t have some core organizing principles, other than your own political well-being, it’s easy to get lost.”

Despite wanting to give the impression that he is decisive, said one person close to Mr. Trump, part of his holdup is that the president constantly changes his mind and equivocates. While Mr. Trump often worries about how his decisions will play, he is also anxious about other people making decisions for him. Figuring out where Mr. Trump will end up, the person said, is like trying to figure out what number the roulette ball will land on.

Judge orders President Trump to testify in 2015 lawsuit

  Judge orders President Trump to testify in 2015 lawsuit New York City judge says Trump is not “above the law.”In a court filing Friday, the judge ordered that Trump sit for a videotaped deposition and provide testimony that can be used at trial in the case.

The New York Times . Ross Douthat | Obama’s Indecision Points. Search. A complete and unassailable response to the official Times film critics’ list.Read more… Letting Trump Be Trump . How the advocates of Trumpism are wrestling with its absence from the Trump presidency.Read more…

Climate Story Jeffrey Gogo Donald Trump almost avoided the major issue of climate change when he spoke for the first time as US President at the annual UN General Assembly meeting in New York last week. And then he eventually mumbled something to the effect of reiterating his previous infamous

The president has few trusted advisers to assist him. And Mr. Trump has also been left even more isolated without his longtime assistant, Madeleine Westerhout, whom the acting White House chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, fired last month after she indiscreetly shared details about his family in an off-the-record dinner with a small group of reporters in Bedminster, N.J., according to multiple White House officials.

Ms. Westerhout had been one of the president’s few organizing influences, the officials said. In the weeks since she left, Mr. Trump has gone back and forth on his feelings about Mr. Mulvaney, praising him one day and denouncing him the next, people familiar with the discussions said.

For longtime Republican analysts, Mr. Trump has a single track he should be traveling on, and any distractions that cause him to take his eyes off could be disastrous politically.

“Right now his big challenge is regaining the initiative on the economic narrative,” said David Winston, a Republican pollster who works with the House Republican Conference. “That is still what is concerning the country. That is the core dynamic he’s going to have to deal with leading into this next election.”

Trump says would want to know what a third summit with Kim would produce .
Trump says would want to know what a third summit with Kim would produce"Right now people would like to see that happen. I want to know what's going to be coming out of it. We can do a lot before the summit takes place," Trump told reporters as he met South Korean President Moon Jae-in on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly.

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