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Politics Perilous times for Trump: By 45%-38%, Americans support impeaching him over Ukraine allegations, poll finds

17:25  03 october  2019
17:25  03 october  2019 Source:   usatoday.com

9 questions about the Trump-Ukraine whistleblower scandal you were too embarrassed to ask

  9 questions about the Trump-Ukraine whistleblower scandal you were too embarrassed to ask Why is it catching on? Could it really mean the end of Trump’s presidency? And why is so much of American politics about Ukraine these days? The Trump-Ukraine whistleblower scandal — it doesn’t really have a catchy name yet — is about more than one phone call. It’s about a months-long effort by Trump and his personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani to drum up foreign investigations into Trump’s political opponents. © Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images President Trump attends the 117th Army-Navy football game with lawyer Rudy Giuliani in Baltimore, Maryland, on December 10, 2016.

Perilous times for Trump : By 45 %- 38 %, Americans support impeaching him over Ukraine allegations , poll finds . Americans have long been wary of impeachment . A USA TODAY/Suffolk University Poll taken in June – months before the formal impeachment inquiry was launched last

In perilous times : Americans are now inclined to support impeaching President Trump and removing him from office, a USA TODAY/Ipsos Poll finds . http Perilous times for Trump : By 45 %- 38 %, Americans support impeaching him over Ukraine allegations , poll finds https

Americans by a 45%-38% plurality now support a vote by the House of Representatives to impeach President Trump, a USA TODAY/Ipsos Poll finds, as allegations continue to swirl around an embattled White House.

By a similar margin, 44%-35%, those surveyed say the Senate, which would then be charged with holding a trial of the president, should convict Trump and remove him from office.

The survey of 1,006 adults, taken Tuesday and Wednesday, underscores the perilous situation the president finds himself in as House committees subpoena documents and prepare to hear testimony into accusations that he pressured the leader of Ukraine to investigate a political rival, then tried to hide the account of their phone conversation.

Analysis: Trump loves to tout his base. But a new poll shows increasing GOP support for impeachment — and even removing him.

  Analysis: Trump loves to tout his base. But a new poll shows increasing GOP support for impeachment — and even removing him. For a president whose political identity is so tied to his base support, a new poll has some bad news. A new Washington Post-Schar School poll shows support for an impeachment inquiry rising to a new high after Democrats formally launched one. The 58 percent who support the inquiry is higher than in any other poll; the 38 percent who oppose it suggests only Trump’s most devoted base is now opposed. Subscribe to the Post Most newsletter: Today’s most popular stories on The Washington Post But even that isn’t quite accurate — because it shows some of Trump’s base does support the inquiry and even his removal.

Perilous times for Trump : By 45 %- 38 %, Americans support impeaching him over Ukraine allegations , poll finds . "The criminal behavior to which Trump has admitted is much more grave than anything alleged or unearthed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller, and much of what Mueller

Perilous times for Trump : By 45 %- 38 %, Americans support impeaching him over Ukraine allegations , poll finds . The video echoed Trump 's unsubstantiated allegations that former Vice President Joe Biden improperly used his influence in office to benefit his son Hunter.

Trump, who has released a rough transcript of his July 25 call with the president of Ukraine, says the conversation was "perfect" and that there was no wrongdoing. On Wednesday, he lashed out during a White House news conference, referring to the inquiry as a "hoax." 

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Americans have long been wary of impeachment. A USA TODAY/Suffolk University Poll taken in June — months before the formal impeachment inquiry was launched last week — found opponents outweighing supporters by nearly 2-1, 61%-32%.

But several national surveys have shown attitudes significantly shifting in the past 10 days, since the latest allegations emerged about Ukraine and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the impeachment inquiry.

Live updates: Trump says he would cooperate if Democrats ‘give us our rights’; Biden makes most direct demand for impeachment

  Live updates: Trump says he would cooperate if Democrats ‘give us our rights’; Biden makes most direct demand for impeachment A day after the White House announced that it would not cooperate with the inquiry into the Ukraine scandal, Democrats vowed to work to hold the president accountable.“President Trump has indicted himself by obstructing justice, refusing to comply with a congressional inquiry … he’s already convicted himself,” Biden said during a fiery address in New Hampshire.

USA TODAY/Ipsos poll : Perilous times for Trump : By 45 %- 38 %, Americans support impeaching him over Ukraine allegations , poll finds . It wouldn't be surprising if the CNN and New York Times moderators quiz candidates on whether the younger Biden's business in Ukraine , as well as China

Trump , Ukraine , Biden and the impeachment inquiry dominated the news this week: Catch up on what happened. A USA TODAY/Ipsos Poll showed Americans by a 45 %- 38 % plurality now support a vote by the House of Representatives to impeach Trump , with a clear division across party lines.

“Our latest USA Today/Ipsos poll shows that public support for impeachment continues to build with a plurality — 45%  — saying the U.S. House should vote to impeach,” said Cliff Young, president of Ipsos Public Affairs. “Most importantly, an overwhelming majority of Americans say that a president is subject to laws like any citizen. Public opinion might be tolerant but there are limits.”

'I don't care': Trump dismisses GOP concern over protecting whistleblower


Impeach? A huge partisan divide

The question of impeachment opens a huge partisan divide. Among Democrats, 74% in the new USA TODAY/Ipsos poll support impeachment; just 17% of Republicans agree. Independents are split down the middle, 37%-37%.

Even among Republicans, however, 30% say the president asking Ukraine to look into the behavior of former vice president Joe Biden and his son, Hunter, would be an abuse of power. And 80% of Republicans — a higher number than among Democrats or independents — say the president is subject to all laws, just like any other citizen. 

McConnell tightlipped as impeachment furor grows

  McConnell tightlipped as impeachment furor grows Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is keeping a low profile amid the growing impeachment battle surrounding the White House over President Trump's political dealings with foreign governments. © Greg Nash McConnell tightlipped as impeachment furor grows McConnell made news in the first days of the two-week congressional recess, when he said he would have "no choice" but to move impeachment if the House sends over articles.Since then, however, he's largely gone quiet, turning his attention to issues like opioid funding, getting money for Ft. Campbell and judicial nominations.

Americans are about evenly split over impeaching President Donald Trump and removing him from office, as support for that move has risen among independents and Republicans, according to a new CNN poll conducted by SSRS after the announcement of a formal impeachment inquiry by House

A trio of polls released Tuesday show Americans support an investigation into accusations that President Donald Trump asked Ukraine to probe his 2020 rival Joe Biden but they are not sold on the idea of the President being removed from office.

Pelosi interview: Trump 'scared' of impeachment inquiry, trying to divert attention

One more warning sign for Trump: Nearly two-thirds of Republicans say there isn't enough reliable information to decide whether he should be impeached. That leaves open the possibility that dramatic disclosures and persuasive evidence could convince some in Trump's own party that impeachment is warranted.

Democrats are more likely to say they already know enough; just 15% say there isn't enough evidence so far. 

Slideshow by photo services

The survey includes some cautionary notes as well for Biden, the Democratic frontrunner for the presidential nomination to challenge Trump next year. By 2-1, 42%-21%, those polled say there are valid reasons to look at the behavior of Joe and Hunter Biden in Ukraine. Even one in four Democrats say an investigation would be legitimate; two-thirds of Republicans agree. Joe Biden was the Obama administration's point person on Ukraine; his son pursued lucrative business arrangements there.

There has been no evidence of wrongdoing by either Biden, though Trump on Wednesday accused them both of being corrupt.

Explain it: What's going on with Trump, Biden and Ukraine?

That said, the poll found a broad bipartisan consensus, including more than six in 10 Republicans and Democrats, that the children of senior officials should be prohibited from benefiting from their family relationships.

While often not illegal, the perception of self-dealing and conflicts of interest have long fueled voter distrust of government and its leaders. Critics have charged that President Trump's children and his business empire have used his position for financial gain.

A visual timeline: Here are the events that led up to Trump's fateful phone call

Whistleblower: A patriot or traitor?

In the poll, views were mixed about the whistleblower who originally reported concerns about Trump's phone call with the Ukrainian president. Seventy-one percent of Democrats call that person "a patriot;" just 10% call him or her "a traitor," a label Trump has used. The president hasn't yet convinced a majority of members of his own party that the description fits, though.

Among Republicans, 36% call the whistleblower "a traitor" but 21% say he or she is a patriot. The largest number, 43%, say they don't know.

What about that call?: Analyzing the Trump-Ukraine 'transcript' in 3 charts

A majority of Americans are knowledgeable about some of the particulars of the impeachment process: 56% know that impeachment begins in the House; 55% know that an impeachment vote in itself doesn't remove a president from office; 62% know that a two-thirds majority in the Senate would be needed to do that.

However, most Americans don't realize that would be an unprecedented step. Fifty-one percent say American presidents have been removed from office by impeachment in the past. While two presidents have been impeached by the House, neither Andrew Johnson nor Bill Clinton was convicted by the Senate. A third president, Richard Nixon, resigned in the face of near-certain impeachment and conviction.

Few Americans, just 3%, predict that Trump will voluntarily resign before the end of his first term; 15% expect him to be removed through impeachment. One-third of those surveyed, 33%, say he will serve out his first term as president. Another 29% predict that he will not only do that but also win a second term.  

The online poll has a credibility interval of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points. 

'A lot of it started with Ukraine': Why the Trump-Zelensky call isn't just about Joe Biden

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Perilous times for Trump: By 45%-38%, Americans support impeaching him over Ukraine allegations, poll finds

Dems scramble to counter Trump with grassroots impeachment campaign .
Dems scramble to counter Trump with grassroots impeachment campaignFor several years now, the impeachment push has been defined by activists beating the drum on Trump — and powerful Democrats in Washington ignoring their calls. But in the two weeks since House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced an impeachment inquiry, this organizational hub has sprouted in D.C., commissioning polling, sponsoring ads and trying to guide the energy in the party toward a message and result the public will support, while counteracting a blistering, expensive anti-impeachment campaign from Trump and the Republican National Committee.

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