Politics: Pelosi holds off on vote to authorize impeachment inquiry - - PressFrom - US
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Politics Pelosi holds off on vote to authorize impeachment inquiry

02:10  16 october  2019
02:10  16 october  2019 Source:   politico.com

White House letter: Why Democrats aren't planning to vote on an impeachment inquiry

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Some House Democrats are privately calling on Pelosi to hold a vote to formalize the impeachment inquiry to undermine Republican criticism. Meanwhile, the White House and its Republican congressional allies contend that such a vote is necessary to legitimize the inquiry per the

But whether Democrats would hold another House vote in the coming days to authorize their inquiry — as has been done in past presidential impeachments — remains to be seen. And Mr. Trump’s allies mostly took it as a sign that a vote on articles of impeachment was inevitable.

UPDATE:

a man wearing a suit and tie holding his hand up: House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn.© Meg Kinnard/AP Photo House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Democratic leaders will hold off on a full House vote authorizing an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, according to multiple lawmakers and aides.

Leadership sources caution that the decision could be "reassessed at some point."

The White House and Republicans have seized on the absence of such a vote and have vowed to resist what they describe as an illegitimate probe.

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Pelosi , however, has stressed that she does not intend to hold a floor vote on the impeachment probe. During the event in New York City Monday, Schiff noted that the Members of the House voted to allow an investigation into whether to impeach President Bill Clinton and President Richard Nixon.

In a letter to Pelosi , House GOP Leader McCarthy today asked 10 questions including, among those: Do you intend to hold a vote of the full House authorizing your impeachment inquiry ? Pelosi response: not at all. Speaking this morning an interview, Pelosi dismissed the impeachment vote as

ORIGINAL:

House Democratic leaders are quietly reaching out to the most vulnerable members of their caucus to gauge whether they would support a formal vote to authorize an impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump, according to multiple Democratic aides.

House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn’s office is leading the outreach and the topic is expected to be discussed at a closed-door leadership meeting Tuesday evening.

Democratic leaders are “getting a read on where these members are following a two-week recess,” according to an aide familiar with the discussion.

But the idea has been met with anxiety among some of the battleground Democrats, who fear it could distract from the agenda, according to multiple aides.

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Pelosi hasn’t ruled out holding a House vote , though she’s derided it as a “Republican talking point” and unnecessary. Although most of those lawmakers have said publicly that they support the inquiry , a floor vote would more directly link them to an effort that’s long been a rallying cry of the outspoken

Republicans are daring House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to hold a formal impeachment vote against President Donald Trump, new Republican National Committee talking points obtained by CNN The full House voted to authorize impeachment inquiries for Presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton.

Asked about the possibility of a vote, Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) told reporters Tuesday afternoon that she planned to discuss the step with her caucus.

"I'll be talking about that later today, after I meet with my colleagues," Pelosi told reporters.

The impeachment inquiry vote would undermine a key Republican talking point — that Democrats’ inquiry isn’t valid because they haven’t held a floor vote, as in past presidential impeachment proceedings. It could also squeeze vulnerable Republicans by forcing them to go on the record. Many Republicans, so far, have attempted to stay away from the burgeoning scandal consuming the White House.

But the move isn’t without risk, particularly for vulnerable Democrats in pro-Trump districts. And it could open Democrats up to another front of GOP criticism, as Republicans demand more power in the investigation, including the ability to issue subpoenas and call their own witnesses.

The White House argues the impeachment inquiry is “constitutionally invalid.” That’s not true.

  The White House argues the impeachment inquiry is “constitutionally invalid.” That’s not true. The White House letter refusing to comply with impeachment makes a dubious legal argument.“Your inquiry is constitutionally invalid and a violation of due process,” the letter from White House counsel Pat Cipollone states. “Your contrived process is unprecedented in the history of the nation and lacks the necessary authorization for a valid impeachment proceeding.

Pelosi has been unflappable while Republicans have criticized her for declining to hold a vote to authorize the impeachment inquiry . The Constitution doesn't require one, but the House held such votes during the impeachment investigations of Presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton.

So far, Pelosi has refused to schedule a vote , arguing that the Constitution and House rules do not require the lawmakers to do so. Meanwhile, the White House and its Republican congressional allies contend that such a vote is necessary to legitimize the inquiry per the recognized standards of

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and other top House Republicans have complained repeatedly that Pelosi has violated past precedent by refusing so far to hold a full House vote authorizing the inquiry.

“Unfortunately, you have given no clear indication as to how your impeachment inquiry will proceed — including whether key historical precedents or basic standards of due process will be observed,” McCarthy said in a letter to Pelosi earlier this month. “In addition, the swiftness and recklessness with which you have proceeded has already resulted in committee chairs attempting to limit minority participation in scheduled interviews, calling into question the integrity of such an inquiry.”

And White House Counsel Pat Cipollone vowed the administration wouldn’t cooperate in Democrats’ probe, saying the process was “illegitimate” and “constitutionally invalid” in the absence of an inquiry vote.

“In the history of our nation, the House of Representatives has never attempted to launch an impeachment inquiry against the president without a majority of the House taking political accountability for that decision by voting to authorize such a dramatic constitutional step,” Cipollone wrote to Pelosi.

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So far, Pelosi has refused to schedule a vote , arguing that the Constitution and House rules do not require the lawmakers to do so. Meanwhile, the White House and its Republican congressional allies contend that such a vote is necessary to legitimize the inquiry per the recognized standards of

On Sept. 24, Pelosi announced that she, without a vote , was launching "a formal impeachment inquiry " after months of resisting pressure from some The House could also vote to hold anyone who does not comply with a subpoena in contempt of Congress, leading to potential fines or even jail

Some Democrats have supported calls for a vote on the floor, hoping it could bolster their case in court as well as silencing their GOP critics. But others have argued that it is not necessary, dismissing Republican complaints that they've been cut out of the process.

"I don't much care about the vote on the floor," said Rep. Jim Himes (D-Conn.), noting that he would vote for the inquiry if it came to the floor. "The point is that it's not required under the rules and there is absolutely no right being denied to the Republicans."

The vast majority of the Democratic caucus has publicly declared support for the caucus’s impeachment push. But Pelosi and her lieutenants have so far resisted calls for an impeachment inquiry vote, which they’ve pointed out is not required by the Constitution or House rules.

“If we want to do it, we’ll do it. If we don’t, we don’t. But we’re certainly not going to do it because of the president,” Pelosi told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution's editorial board earlier this month.

Just seven Democrats remain opposed to the impeachment inquiry: Reps. Jeff Van Drew (D-N.J.), Anthony Brindisi (D-N.Y.), Joe Cunningham (D-S.C.), Jared Golden (D-Maine), Kendra Horn (D-Okla.), Ron Kind (D-Wis.) and Colin Peterson (D-Minn.).

Senate GOP introduces resolution condemning House impeachment inquiry .
Senate Republicans introduced a resolution on Thursday condemning the impeachment inquiry against President Trump and calling on the House to hold a formal vote on the inquiry. Senate Judiciary Committee Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) is spearheading the resolution, which is backed by 39 GOP senators including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.). "Every American should be disturbed by what is taking place in the House of Representatives regarding the attempt to impeach President Trump," Graham said in a statement."We cannot have a country where every American has rights except Donald Trump.

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