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Politics Democratic candidates go after Elizabeth Warren over how much her Medicare for All plan will cost at Ohio debate

04:30  16 october  2019
04:30  16 october  2019 Source:   businessinsider.com

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Democratic candidates go after Elizabeth Warren over how much her Medicare for All plan will cost at Ohio debate . Buttigieg framed Warren and Sen. Bernie Sanders' single-payer plan as " Medicare for all , whether you want it or not." Warren , in response, said Buttigieg's plan for a public

Everybody went after Elizabeth Warren over Medicare - for - all . The center-left Democrats see Warren as vulnerable on health care. The Buttigieg campaign said before the debate that their candidate would attack Warren over Medicare - for - all , contrasting her roundabout answer to the tax

Elizabeth Warren, Peter Buttigieg are posing for a picture© AP Photo/John Minchillo

Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Sen. Amy Klobuchar went after Sen. Elizabeth Warren over her support for Medicare for All, opening up one of the most significant policy arguments in the Democratic Party during the fourth presidential debate on Wednesday night.

Buttigieg kicked off the spirited discussion by accusing Warren of not releasing details on how she'd play for a single-payer health program, which would cost the federal government tens of trillions of dollars.

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  5 key takeaways from the 4th Democratic debate The 12 candidates opened by discussing impeachment, debated health care, tried to stand out from the pack and Sen. Elizabeth Warren faced the scrutiny of a front-runner.(Pictured) Democratic presidential candidates (L-R) Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI), billionaire Tom Steyer, Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ), Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg, former tech executive Andrew Yang, former Texas congressman Beto O'Rourke, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), and former housing secretary Julian Castro at the start of the Democratic Presidential Debate at Otterbein University on Oct.

How much would a “ Medicare for all ” plan , like the kind endorsed by the Democratic presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren , change health spending in the United States? Some advocates have said costs would actually be lower because of gains in efficiency and scale

After five debates in which health care has been a top issue, the candidates drew sharper battle lines over how they would pay a Medicare - for - All system The back-and-forth came during a debate over whether Democrats should pursue a more ambitious agenda, catering liberal elements of the party

"Your signature is to have a plan for everything, except this," Buttigieg said. "No plan has been laid out to explain how a multi-trillion dollar hole in this plan that senator Warren is putting forward is supposed to get filled in."

Warren said that she would raise taxes on the wealthy and large corporations in order to pay for her plan, but insisted that "costs" for middle class families would go down.

"We can pay for this," Warren said. "Costs will go up for wealthy, for big corporations. They will not go up for middle class families. I will not sign a bill into law that raises their costs. Because costs are what people care about."

While Buttigieg framed Warren and Sen. Bernie Sanders' single-payer plan as "Medicare for all, whether you want it or not," Warren said Buttigieg's plan for a public option would amount to "Medicare for all who can afford it."

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  Analysis: Warren still growing into front-runner status WESTERVILLE, Ohio (AP) — The question was inevitable. Elizabeth Warren's answer was the same. And her rivals seized on it. For the second consecutive debate, Warren refused to say whether middle-class Americans would pay higher taxes under her proposed Medicare for All plan. It was a glaring dodge for a candidate who has risen to the top of the Democratic field by unveiling detailed policy proposals and selling them with a folksy flair.And it was one of nearly a half a dozen issues where Warren found herself defending the broad ambition she has laid out to remake the American economy and rebalance the nation's wealth.

Senator Amy Klobuchar confronted Senator Elizabeth Warren over her health care plan and taxes in Tuesday night’s Democratic debate in Westerville, Ohio . In the first exchange, Ms. Warren , who is from Massachusetts, was asked repeatedly how she would pay for “ Medicare for all ” and insisted

The fourth democratic debate takes place in Ohio on Tuesday, Oct. Warren was again asked if middle class taxes will go up with Medicare for All . Elizabeth Warren tonight refused to directly explain how she would fund Medicare for All — and many of the other 2020 Democrats called her

Klobuchar soon jumped into the debate, accusing Warren of not being transparent with Americans about the costs of her plan.

"I think we owe it to the American people to tell them where we're going to send the invoice," Klobuchar said.

Sanders also jumped into the discussion, defending his bill.

"The issue is whether the Democratic Party has the guts to stand up to the healthcare industry ... the price-fixing pharmaceutical industry," Sanders said.

The debate, hosted by CNN and The New York Times in Columbus, Ohio, featured a whopping 12 candidates.

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