Politics: Schiff: Mulvaney comments on Ukraine aid have made things 'much, much worse' - - PressFrom - US
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Politics Schiff: Mulvaney comments on Ukraine aid have made things 'much, much worse'

02:20  18 october  2019
02:20  18 october  2019 Source:   thehill.com

Mulvaney appears to confirm Ukraine aid was contingent upon 2016 probe

  Mulvaney appears to confirm Ukraine aid was contingent upon 2016 probe The acting White House chief of staff acknowledged that U.S. military aid to Ukraine was previously withheld at least in part because of allegations of election interference.

“I think Mr. Mulvaney ’s acknowledgment means that things have gone from very, very bad to much , much worse ,” Schiff told reporters Thursday, demurring when asked how Mulvaney ’s comments would affect the pace of the House’s impeachment inquiry.

He also wanted more attention paid to Ukraine ’s persistent political corruption. Mr. Mulvaney denied that the aid for Ukraine was also contingent on its government opening an investigation into either former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., a leading Democratic candidate for president, or his

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) said Thursday that acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney's comments linked the withholding of aid to Ukraine to investigations into the 2016 election have made things "much worse" for the president.

Adam Schiff, Juan Vargas are posing for a picture: Schiff: Mulvaney comments on Ukraine aid have made things 'much, much worse'© Greg Nash Schiff: Mulvaney comments on Ukraine aid have made things 'much, much worse'

"I think Mr. Mulvaney's acknowledgment means that things have gone from very, very bad to much, much worse," Schiff, a key Democrat in the impeachment inquiry of President Trump, told reporters Thursday.

Schiff demurred when asked how Mulvaney's comments would affect the pace of the House's impeachment inquiry.

Republicans worried by Mick Mulvaney's confirmation Trump sought exchange of favors with Ukraine

  Republicans worried by Mick Mulvaney's confirmation Trump sought exchange of favors with Ukraine A top White House official said on Thursday that President Donald Trump had withheld nearly $400 million in military aid to Ukraine in order to pressure the country to open an investigation that he thought would politically benefit himself, worrying some Republicans in Congress in the middle of an impeachment inquiry. © Evan Vucci/AP White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney announces that the G7 will be held at Trump National Doral, Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019, in Washington.

He also wanted more attention paid to Ukraine ’s persistent political corruption. Mr. Mulvaney denied that the aid for Ukraine was also contingent on its government opening an investigation into either former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., a leading Democratic candidate for president, or his

Mulvaney ’s comments drew instant attention from Democrats and the establishment media, who took it as a confirmation of a “quid pro quo” exchange with Ukraine in order to get military aid to the country. In a statement sent to reporters after the briefing, Mulvaney criticized the media for deciding to

Schiff later expanded on his comments when speaking to reporters before heading back into a closed-door deposition of Trump's ambassador to the European Union, Gordon Sondland.

"The idea that vital military systems would be withheld for such a patently political reason, for the reason of serving the president's reelection campaign, is a phenomenal breach of the president's duty to defend our national security," Schiff said.

Schiff added that he hopes every member of Congress, Democrat and Republican, will "speak out and condemn this elicit action by the president and his chief of staff."

Schiff did not respond to questions over whether Mulvaney will be brought in to testify as part of the ongoing impeachment inquiry.

Mulvaney Denies Admitting Quid Pro Quo on Ukraine Military Aid

  Mulvaney Denies Admitting Quid Pro Quo on Ukraine Military Aid Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney denied saying that President Donald Trump withheld military aid to Ukraine as a quid pro quo to get the country to investigate Democrats. © Bloomberg Mick Mulvaney speaks during a news conference in the press briefing room of the White House on Oct. 17. “Let me be clear, there was absolutely no quid pro quo between Ukrainian military aid and any investigation into the 2016 election,” Mulvaney said in a statement on Thursday evening. “The president never told me to withhold any money until the Ukrainians did anything related to the server.

Mulvaney said the delay in aid to Ukraine was related instead to what he described as legitimate concerns about Mulvaney said one reason Trump ordered aid withheld from Ukraine was to get the country to cooperate (Updates with Schiff , Murkowski remarks in sixth through eighth paragraphs).

Mulvaney ’s earlier comments represented the first official acknowledgement of a link by the White House between the aid and investigations the president wanted Ukraine to pursue. Mulvaney 's backtracking was prompted by the vocal response by Democrats to his original comments .

The California lawmaker's comments come after Mulvaney had earlier indicated that the Trump administration held up military aid to Ukraine in part because officials wanted Kiev to investigate unproven election interference allegations linking the country to a Democratic National Committee (DNC) server.

"I have news for everybody. Get over it. There's going to be political influence in foreign policy ... that's going to happen. Elections have consequences," Mulvaney told reporters Thursday, saying "we do that all the time with foreign policy" when asked if a "quid pro quo" was involved in the eventual release of the aid.

Mulvaney denied any aid was withheld to pressure Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son.

The comments came the same day that Sondland testified. He was expected to tell members that a text message in which he said Trump "didn't want a quid pro quo ... didn't want anything from Ukraine" was dictated by Trump himself.

Energy Secretary Rick Perry told The Wall Street Journal this week that he had been told to talk to Trump's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani to set up a meeting with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky and that Giuliani had repeatedly invoked conspiracy theories about the 2016 election and Biden.

-- Updated at 4:02 p.m.

'Go to confession': Scaramucci urges Mick Mulvaney to leave the White House .
Anthony Scaramucci claimed he feels “bad” for Mick Mulvaney and urged him to resign from his position as acting White House chief of staff. © Provided by MediaDC: Washington Newspaper Publishing Company, Inc.The former White House communications director urged Mulvaney to obtain an attorney and leave his position before the impeachment inquiry moves ahead. In an interview on CNN’s New Day, Scaramucci claimed Mulvaney is a “good guy” trying to do an “impossible” job in working for President Trump.[Read: Mulvaney admits Trump withheld Ukraine funding over investigation push]“You can’t work for a guy like that.

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