•   
  •   
  •   

Politics Current White House official willing to testify publicly in impeachment probe: Source

21:55  31 october  2019
21:55  31 october  2019 Source:   abcnews.go.com

Democrats zero in on 'abuse of power' in impeachment inquiry

  Democrats zero in on 'abuse of power' in impeachment inquiry Pelosi is said to favor one sweeping charge related to Ukraine, but there's some debate about the need for additional charges.As Democrats continue closed-door depositions with critical witnesses and prepare to move to the next phase of public hearings, they are wrestling over which elements and evidence to bring in, which to leave out. The goal is to explain to the public the reasoning and relevance of any eventual impeachment charges.

Alexander Vindman, the first current White House official to cooperate with House impeachment investigators and appear on Capitol Hill for a closed-door deposition, is willing to testify publicly in the next phase of the inquiry, according to a source familiar with his thinking. A National Security Council

(MORE: White House official testifies he warned Trump's Ukraine request could 'undermine' (MORE: Conflicts between Sondland, other witnesses in impeachment probe raise questions). Vindman also told impeachment investigators that he believed that the promise of a White House

Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, the first current White House official to cooperate with House impeachment investigators and appear on Capitol Hill for a closed-door deposition, is willing to testify publicly in the next phase of the inquiry, according to a source familiar with his thinking.

a man wearing a uniform: National Security Council Director for European Affairs Alexander Vindman arrives for a closed-door deposition at the US Capitol in Washington, D.C., Oct. 29, 2019.© Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images National Security Council Director for European Affairs Alexander Vindman arrives for a closed-door deposition at the US Capitol in Washington, D.C., Oct. 29, 2019.

A National Security Council official Ukraine specialist, Vindman told investigators earlier this week that he was so "concerned" by the president’s comments on a July phone call with the Ukrainian president, he notified a White House lawyer.

Two House Democrats break ranks with Pelosi on impeachment rules vote

  Two House Democrats break ranks with Pelosi on impeachment rules vote The resolution passed 232-196 but lacked votes from Reps. Jeff Van Drew and Collin Peterson.

Four White House officials scheduled to appear before the House Oversight, Intelligence and GOP embracing impeachment fight: In 2020 ads, Republicans betting Trump inquiry will backfire on Perry had been invited to testify Wednesday, but the Energy Department released a statement Friday

All four White House officials who are scheduled to give depositions on Monday during the House 's impeachment inquiry won't show up, as a source with knowledge of the situation tells CNN that National Security Council lawyers John Eisenberg and Michael Ellis will not testify .

(MORE: White House official testifies he warned Trump's Ukraine request could 'undermine' national security)

Vindman, the first witness to appear on Capitol Hill with firsthand knowledge of the call, has not yet been formally contacted by House impeachment investigators about testifying in public, the source said.

"I was concerned by the call. I did not think it was proper to demand that a foreign government investigate a U.S. citizen, and I was worried about the implications for the U.S. government’s support of Ukraine," Vindman testified, according to a copy of his opening remarks obtained by ABC News.

a man wearing a military uniform: National Security Council Director for European Affairs Alexander Vindman arrives for a closed-door deposition at the US Capitol in Washington, D.C., Oct. 29, 2019.© Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images National Security Council Director for European Affairs Alexander Vindman arrives for a closed-door deposition at the US Capitol in Washington, D.C., Oct. 29, 2019. (MORE: Who is Alexander Vindman, the Army officer defying the White House to testify about Trump's Ukraine call?)

An attorney for Vindman and a spokesman for House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff declined to comment for this story.

What comes next in the impeachment inquiry? Public hearings on an uncertain timeline

  What comes next in the impeachment inquiry? Public hearings on an uncertain timeline The House Intelligence and Judiciary Committees will hold public hearings, and previous confidential witness testimony will be released to the public. Trump’s counsel will be allowed to participate in the Judiciary Committee’s phase of the process by receiving evidence and staff reports, questioning witnesses, submitting additional evidence, and being invited to offer a concluding presentation.It is unclear, however, when the public hearings will begin, though they are sure to be high-profile.

White House budget official Mark Sandy entered a closed session of the House of Representatives impeachment inquiry of President Trump on Saturday. Sandy is expected to testify about the holdup of military aid to Ukraine.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – All four White House officials who are scheduled to appear before Democratic-led Another source told CNN that two other OMB officials , Michael Duffey and Russell Vought The refusals by more witnesses to give testimony in the impeachment inquiry could set the stage for

The Ukraine-born Vindman, who serves in the Army and was awarded a Purple Heart after an improvised explosive device attack in Iraq, could be a key witness for Democrats as they seek to take public their investigation into whether President Donald Trump improperly withheld military aid to Ukraine to pressure the country to open investigations into Burisma, an energy company that once employed former Vice President Joe Biden’s son, Hunter, and the 2016 election.

"I realized that if Ukraine pursued an investigation into the Bidens and Burisma, it would likely be interpreted as a partisan play, which would undoubtedly result in Ukraine losing the bipartisan support it has thus far maintained," Vindman said in his opening statement. "This would all undermine U.S. national security. Following the call, I again reported my concerns to NSC’s lead counsel."

White House officials won't testify in Trump impeachment probe Monday

  White House officials won't testify in Trump impeachment probe Monday John Eisenberg, the National Security Council’s lawyer, and his deputy, Michael Ellis, were called to testify Monday by impeachment investigators.Four White House officials scheduled to appear before the House Oversight, Intelligence and Foreign Affairs committees, are not expected to show up, according to multiple media reports.

Mark Sandy, the only official from the Office of Management and Budget to honor a request to testify by the Democratic-led House impeachment probe , testified Saturday in a closed-door hearing.

Mark Sandy, the only official from the Office of Management and Budget to honor a request to testify by the Democratic-led House impeachment probe , testified Saturday in a closed-door hearing.

The House voted largely along party lines on Thursday to approve an impeachment resolution, laying out the procedures for the upcoming public hearings, which could begin as early as November, in the House Intelligence Committee.

(MORE: Trump directed me to work with Giuliani to push Ukraine on investigations: Sondland)

The testimony of Vindman could provide insight into how White House officials work to restrict access to a rough transcript of Trump's call with the Ukrainian president.

Vindman, along with his twin brother Yevgeny, who also serves in the Army and on the NSC staff, approached John Eisenberg, the NSC’s top lawyer, with his concerns about Trump’s comments on the July 25 call and read-out notes he took during it, according to a source familiar with Vindman's testimony.

a man standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: National Security Council Director for European Affairs Alexander Vindman arrives for a closed-door deposition at the US Capitol in Washington, DC on Oct. 29, 2019.© Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images National Security Council Director for European Affairs Alexander Vindman arrives for a closed-door deposition at the US Capitol in Washington, DC on Oct. 29, 2019.

In that meeting, which also included Michael Ellis, a White House attorney and Eisenberg’s deputy, Eisenberg suggested moving the transcript of Trump’s call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to a system meant to store classified, sensitive national security information, according to the source.

Donald Trump's White House braces for public impeachment hearings

  Donald Trump's White House braces for public impeachment hearings President Donald Trump and his allies are bracing for open hearings that will preoccupy Washington and bring to life the vivid picture of presidential behavior that until now has been confined to written statements and private testimony. © Win McNamee/Getty Images WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 18: U.S. President Donald Trump (R) and Vice President Mike Pence listen during a conference call with the International Space Station on October 18, 2019 in Washington, DC. Trump spoke with NASA astronauts Jessica Meir and Christina Koch as the pair became the first women to conduct an all female space walk outside the space station.

Mark Sandy, the only official from the Office of Management and Budget to honor a request to testify by the Democratic-led House impeachment probe , testified Saturday in a closed-door hearing.

Mark Sandy, the only official from the Office of Management and Budget to honor a request to testify by the Democratic-led House impeachment probe , testified Saturday in a closed-door hearing.

House impeachment investigators are seeking to question Ellis and Eisenberg next week, though it's unclear if they will cooperate with the inquiry.

Vindman also testified that he suggested changes to clarify a rough transcript of Trump’s call with Zelenskiy, according to sources present for his testimony.

(MORE: Conflicts between Sondland, other witnesses in impeachment probe raise questions)

Two of the changes -- a mention of Burisma, the Ukrainian energy company, by Zelenskiy, and a reference to recordings of Biden discussing corruption in Ukraine by Trump -- were not adopted, Vindman told investigators, though he did not testify to any motive behind the White House’s review process.

Vindman also told impeachment investigators that he believed that the promise of a White House meeting, and later, nearly $400 million in military aid to Ukraine, was being withheld in exchange for the investigations into Burisma and the 2016 election, according to sources familiar with his testimony.

Republicans who participated in the deposition on Wednesday dismissed Vindman’s opening statement and impression of Trump’s call with Zelenskiy.

"It doesn't trouble me," Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, the top Republican on the House Oversight Committee, told reporters. "The facts have not changed."

Analysis: Only 3 Senate Republicans aren't defending Trump from the impeachment inquiry. Here's why. .
Mitt Romney, Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski have refused to sign a resolution denouncing the House Democratic effort.While a resolution denouncing the House Democrats' fast-moving probe hasn't received a vote, GOP Sens. Mitt Romney of Utah, Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska declined to sign on as co-sponsors — the only ones out of 53 Republicans — leaving the door ajar to the possibility that they could vote to convict President Donald Trump if impeachment moves to its trial phase in the Senate.

Topical videos:

usr: 2
This is interesting!