Politics: Kellyanne Conway: 'I Don't Know' Whether There Was A Quid Pro Quo With Ukraine - - PressFrom - US
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Politics Kellyanne Conway: 'I Don't Know' Whether There Was A Quid Pro Quo With Ukraine

22:30  03 november  2019
22:30  03 november  2019 Source:   huffingtonpost.com

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White House counselor Kellyanne Conway said on Sunday that she does not know whether U.S. military aid was withheld from Ukraine to solicit help in an investigation of former Vice President Joe Biden, refusing to guarantee that there was no quid pro quo at any time.

Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway pauses as she speaks to media outside the West Wing of the White House, Thursday, July 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)© ASSOCIATED PRESS Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway pauses as she speaks to media outside the West Wing of the White House, Thursday, July 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

During an appearance on CNN’s “State of the Union,” Conway instead repeatedly emphasized that the funds were ultimately sent after being delayed over the summer.

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“I feel confident about the fact that Ukraine has that aid and is using it right now, that it’s because of this president that they have it,” she said.

Pressed by host Dana Bash, who pointed out that Conway “very notably won’t say ‘yes’ or ‘no’” on the question of whether President Donald Trump was seeking to make a deal, Conway said she wasn’t sure.

“I don’t know whether aid was being held and for how long,” she said.

The question has become central to House Democrats’ impeachment probe of Trump following the release of a summary of his July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. According to the document, Trump urged Zelensky to assist his personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani and Attorney General William Barr with an investigation of Biden and his son based on unsubstantiated corruption allegations. At the time of the conversation, the aid was being withheld.

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Last month, The New York Times reported that high-level Ukrainian officials were aware by the first week in August that the assistance had been frozen, contradicting Trump’s claim that they were in the dark on the situation.

However, it appears the GOP may be shifting its messaging on the potential quid pro quo in order to bolster their defense of Trump.

On Friday, The Washington Post reported that Senate Republicans are gearing up to acknowledge that Trump used the aid as leverage and that while it was not legal, it is not an impeachable act.

Last week, Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, the National Security Council’s top Ukraine expert, testified before congressional investigators, and is thought to have provided firsthand information about Trump’s call.

According to Vindman’s prepared remarks obtained by HuffPost, he “was concerned by the call” and “did not think it was proper to demand that a foreign government investigate a U.S. citizen.” He decided to report the discussion, he said, because he felt Trump’s actions could “undermine U.S. national security.”

This article originally appeared on HuffPost.

How Republican Defenses of Trump on Impeachment Have Shifted Over Time .
Democrats paint the changing defense as evidence of its weakness. Republicans attribute it to another source: disorganization . So far, they say, there’s been little coordination between the White House and Trump’s nominal allies on the Hill about a messaging strategy.Here’s a look at how the defense of Donald Trump has changed since the impeachment proceedings began.‘No Quid Pro Quo’Since the moment he authorized the release of a transcript, Trump has maintained there was no quid pro quo in his withholding military aid from Ukraine while pushing the country to investigate Joe and Hunter Biden.

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