Politics: Democrats engineer multiple chances to make the case for Trump’s impeachment - - PressFrom - US
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Politics Democrats engineer multiple chances to make the case for Trump’s impeachment

23:30  09 november  2019
23:30  09 november  2019 Source:   washingtonpost.com

Judge fast-tracks case over former White House official's refusal to testify in impeachment inquiry

  Judge fast-tracks case over former White House official's refusal to testify in impeachment inquiry A federal judge on Thursday fast-tracked a case involving a key impeachment witness caught between House Democrats seeking to compel his testimony and a White House order to defy a congressional subpoena. Judge Richard Leon, a George W. Bush appointee to the federal district court in D.C., called the legal dispute over the testimony of Charles Kupperman, a former deputy to former national security adviser John Bolton, a "matter of great publicJudge Richard Leon, a George W. Bush appointee to the federal district court in D.C.

In September, Judiciary Democrats called Corey Lewandowski, Trump ’ s first 2016 campaign manager and still a presidential confidant, to answer questions A majority of House Democrats backed moving toward impeachment proceedings on the Russia case , but Pelosi remained defiant against such a

Faced with new allegations against President Trump and administration stonewalling, Democrats have ended months of caution. Speaker Nancy Pelosi said the House would begin formal impeachment proceedings against President Trump , ending months of caution by Democrats .CreditCredit Erin

It’s rare in politics to get a second chance, let alone a third, at making a first impression. But that is the opportunity presented to House Democrats in the week ahead, as they take their impeachment inquiry public, searching for a much sharper focus than previous oversight hearings that tended to backfire.

Adam Schiff wearing a suit and tie smiling and looking at the camera: Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.), chairman of the House Intelligence Committee who is leading the impeachment inquiry of President Trump, addresses the media on Monday.© Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.), chairman of the House Intelligence Committee who is leading the impeachment inquiry of President Trump, addresses the media on Monday.

The House Intelligence Committee, in a pair of hearings with career diplomats, hopes to do what other panels have failed to do in their previous attempts at high-profile investigations of President Trump: deliver a dramatic rendering of the facts that are easily understood by the average voter and make clear how those actions represent abuses of power that are considered high crimes and misdemeanors.

McConnell discounts quick dismissal of Trump impeachment articles: 'We'll have to have a trial'

  McConnell discounts quick dismissal of Trump impeachment articles: 'We'll have to have a trial' Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) brushed aside a question on Wednesday about trying to quickly dismiss the articles of impeachment against President Trump, noting the chamber would have to have a trial."I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell"I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell told reporters.

Nearly every Democrat in the US House of Representatives have now said they support an impeachment investigation into President Donald Trump .

House Democrats have considered drafting as many as three articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump , as they prepare to take their Ukraine impeachment inquiry public next week after a month of closed-door depositions, according to multiple sources familiar with the deliberations.

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Having learned lessons about those previous mistakes, Democrats fashioned the resolution formalizing the impeachment inquiry to address several procedural hiccups that they think will make these new hearings more dramatic. And, more broadly, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) has recently begun to hold weekly huddles with the Democrats who are most often on TV news shows talking about the investigation. The purpose is to work on message and drive home the importance of keeping the focus on Trump’s actions and not getting distracted by side characters, such as the president’s personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani.

McConnell discounts quick dismissal of Trump impeachment articles: 'We'll have to have a trial'

  McConnell discounts quick dismissal of Trump impeachment articles: 'We'll have to have a trial' Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) brushed aside a question on Wednesday about trying to quickly dismiss the articles of impeachment against President Trump, noting the chamber would have to have a trial."I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell"I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell told reporters.

The Case for Impeachment is a non-fiction book by American University Distinguished Professor of History Allan Lichtman arguing for the impeachment of Donald Trump . It was published on April 18, 2017, by Dey Street Books, an imprint of HarperCollins.

If the impeachment trial is seen as an unfair partisan exercise or an overreach, it could hurt rising Democratic chances to topple incumbents in places like Iowa and North Carolina. “A lot will depend on what is the case , what is the situation when it gets to the Senate, and how did the House handle it.”

So far, Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.), chairman of the Intelligence Committee, has won accolades from Democrats for an approach that is getting three bites of the media apple with each witness. First, Schiff and two other committees conducting the investigations brought them behind closed doors for depositions — some portions of which got leaked. Then, over the past week, the committees publicly released the transcripts of key witnesses, confirming what had already leaked and revealing new damaging information. And now every committee member will be fully prepped for televised hearings in the weeks ahead.

“I think the pace is good: slow enough to prepare responsibly but fast enough to stay in harmony with the public’s interest in the subject,” said Loch K. Johnson, an oversight expert who once served on the Senate’s Church Committee in the 1970s that investigated CIA abuses.

White House dismisses impeachment transcripts: Trump 'has done nothing wrong'

  White House dismisses impeachment transcripts: Trump 'has done nothing wrong' The White House claimed Tuesday that newly released transcripts showed there is “even less evidence” underscoring House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry into President Trump’s interactions with Ukraine than previously known. © The Hill White House dismisses impeachment transcripts: Trump 'has done nothing wrong' "Both transcripts released today show there is even less evidence for this illegitimate impeachment sham than previously thought," White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham said in a statement.

Their challenge in impeaching Trump is keeping the tale of his Ukraine scandal simple as they try to move forward through a thicket of Republican defenses In turn, they hope, voters will put enough pressure on Republicans in Congress to remove Trump through the impeachment process, or, short

But Trump seems determined to force the issue. I was planning to avoid writing about impeachment for a while because my Bloomberg Opinion colleague Francis Wilkinson nailed it recently when he explained 1. Dan Drezner on the foreign-policy conversation among Democrats leading into 2020.

Johnson has previously urged congressional committees to slow down so that they do not miss key details. But this investigation is exploring actions taking place in almost real time regarding Trump’s summertime bid to pressure Ukraine officials into investigating his domestic political rivals while withholding nearly $400 million in security aid to the longtime U.S. ally.

These new hearings will look and feel different from other hearings, first and foremost because there are just 13 Democrats and nine Republicans on Schiff’s committee.

In recent months, the Judiciary Committee, with more than 40 members, has held the highest-profile hearings, performances that soured fellow Democrats on that panel’s ability to lead investigations into the president.

In September, Judiciary Democrats called Corey Lewandowski, Trump’s first 2016 campaign manager and still a presidential confidant, to answer questions about his role in the president’s push to get someone to fire the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, in the early days of his investigation. With so many committee members trying to rush their questions into a small time frame, Lewandowski filibustered and verbally danced around most of the hearing.

Impeachment team releases transcript of defense official

  Impeachment team releases transcript of defense official WASHINGTON (AP) — House investigators are releasing another transcript in the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump. The transcript being made public Monday is from the testimony of Laura Cooper, a deputy assistant secretary of defense, in a closed-door interview. House Democrats are moving forward with the first live, public hearings of the impeachment inquiry this week. The House is investigating whether Trump violated his oath of office by pushing Ukraine's president to investigate Democrats, including rival Joe Biden, while the administration was withholding military funds for the East European ally.

The Case for Impeachment . The authors, Ron Fein, John Bonifaz and Ben Clements, are all veteran Constitutional attorneys, and do not reach this conclusion lightly. Rather, they carefully examine Constitutional history, law, and politics to make a reasoned case that can be understood both by legal

The story of President Donald Trump and impeachment is difficult to follow: It moves fast and our understanding of the facts changes as witnesses testify. We get it. To track this important, complicated story, Vox created this explainer to serve as a guide to the saga.

That came after the same panel’s late July hearing with Mueller, a much-hyped affair four months after he filed his report on Russia’s efforts to interfere in the 2016 campaign to Trump’s benefit. Democrats told reporters Mueller would “bring to life” his complicated 400-plus-page report, hoping the whispers were wrong that, about to turn 75, he would not be the same witness he was last decade when he was FBI director.

Mueller’s performance was uneven. A majority of House Democrats backed moving toward impeachment proceedings on the Russia case, but Pelosi remained defiant against such a move — until the Ukraine controversy broke into the open and allowed Pelosi to push that probe into the more manageable Intelligence Committee.

Each member of that panel is handpicked by Pelosi, providing a smaller group that includes what she thinks are her sharpest Democrats.

Republicans have mocked the process as a “Soviet-style” investigation, in the words of House Minority Whip Steve Scalise (La.), because so much happened in an underground secure room in the Capitol Visitor Center. But they have also tacitly admitted that Schiff’s team has been effective by their effort to reshuffle their committee membership ahead of Wednesday’s kickoff hearing with William B. Taylor Jr., the top U.S. diplomat in Kyiv.

Impeachment investigators ask Rick Perry to testify

  Impeachment investigators ask Rick Perry to testify Energy Secretary Rick Perry is being called to testify in the House impeachment inquiry. Perry, the first member of President Donald Trump's Cabinet who has asked to appear before House investigators, is scheduled for Wednesday, according an official working on the impeachment inquiry but unauthorized to discuss it publicly. The person was granted anonymity. It's unclear if Perry would show up for the closed-door session. HousePerry, the first member of President Donald Trump's Cabinet who has asked to appear before House investigators, is scheduled for Wednesday, according an official working on the impeachment inquiry but unauthorized to discuss it publicly. The person was granted anonymity.

Trump has called the House impeachment process unfair. “They shouldn’t be having public hearings. House Democrats are following a similar process used in the impeachment inquiries of They're going to make charges. And obviously House Republicans will have the chance to rebut the

The impeachment inquiry focuses on whether Trump and his agents put pressure on Ukraine' s President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to Watergate prosecutor says clear case to impeach Trump . The resolution was the first major vote as Democrats press an impeachment inquiry against the president.

Rep. Devin Nunes (Calif.), in five years as the Intelligence Committee’s top Republican, has been uneven at public hearings. So GOP leaders shifted Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) and his top staff onto the panel to be one of their lead questioners, because he is viewed as a more forceful interrogator of witnesses.

Democrats, however, think they have fixed a few wrinkles governing the impeachment inquiry, which will mitigate any impact of Jordan’s aggressive style. First, as they reviewed the Mueller hearing, Republicans overwhelmed Democrats with a bunch of procedural complaints and demandedvotes at the outset, turning the opening into a spectacle.

Now, if Nunes and Jordan try that Wednesday, those points of order will be piled up and voted on at the end of the hearing, allowing the witnesses to get started sooner.

Also, the first 90 minutes of the hearing are given over to Schiff and then Nunes, equally divided, for questions, without interruption, rather than just the five-minute rounds that other committees use. This will give Schiff time to draw out Taylor and his predecessor, Marie Yovanovitch, who was ousted from Kyiv after complaints from Trump and Giuliani.

Also, Schiff’s counsel will be allowed to ask questions at the front end of the hearing, correcting a mistake from the Lewandowski hearing, when the Judiciary counsel was allowed to ask questions only at the end. That portion of the hearing revealed new facts from Lewandowski, but because it came at the end of a marathon session, it drew little notice.

Johnson, who is now a professor emeritus at the University of Georgia’s School of Public and International Affairs, said Schiff has set up the process to lay out the case.

“The American viewing public will be left to decide on the merits of the impeachment case, filtered through media analyses and the conclusions reached by various opinion leaders — nationally, locally and within families, which is how democracy is supposed to work,” Johnson said.

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Giuliani pens op-ed slamming 'unprecedented' impeachment inquiry .
Rudy Giuliani, President Trump's personal attorney, penned an op-ed published Tuesday slamming the House's "unprecedented" impeachment investigation.The op-ed, which comes a day before the House holds its first public hearings in the inquiry, claims Trump's interactions with Ukraine were "innocent" and that House Democrats are unfairly targeting his client."The manner in which [Rep. Adam Schiff] and Speaker Nancy Pelosi are conducting this impeachment investigation is unprecedented, constitutionally questionable, and an affront to American fair play," Giuliani wrote in The Wall Street Journal.

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