Politics: Senate GOP waves Trump off early motion to dismiss impeachment charges - - PressFrom - US
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Politics Senate GOP waves Trump off early motion to dismiss impeachment charges

04:00  14 november  2019
04:00  14 november  2019 Source:   thehill.com

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Senate Republicans are telling President Trump ’s defense team to prepare for a full Senate trial, stating that any motion for an early dismissal of impeachment charges likely won’t have the votes to pass.

Senator John Cornyn (TX), a key member of the Senate GOP leadership; and a member of the Senate Judiciary and Intelligence committees Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky, is one Republican senator who previously hinted at the possibility of advancing a motion to dismiss the articles of impeachment .

Roy Blunt, Mitch McConnell, Joni Ernst are posing for a picture: Senate GOP waves Trump off early motion to dismiss impeachment charges© Greg Nash Senate GOP waves Trump off early motion to dismiss impeachment charges

Senate Republicans are telling President Trump's defense team to prepare for a full Senate trial, stating that any motion for an early dismissal of impeachment charges likely won't have the votes to pass.

The warnings are a tacit acknowledgement that it would be politically risky to simply discard articles of impeachment - even though all Senate Republicans may ultimately opt to acquit the president.

McConnell discounts quick dismissal of Trump impeachment articles: 'We'll have to have a trial'

  McConnell discounts quick dismissal of Trump impeachment articles: 'We'll have to have a trial' Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) brushed aside a question on Wednesday about trying to quickly dismiss the articles of impeachment against President Trump, noting the chamber would have to have a trial."I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell"I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell told reporters.

GOP dismisses first impeachment hearing as boring: 'Everybody has their impression of what truth is'. WASHINGTON – As the American public got their first glimpse of the case against President Donald Trump on Tuesday during the first public impeachment hearing, Republicans went on

Senator John Cornyn (TX), a key member of the Senate GOP leadership; and a member of the Senate Judiciary and Intelligence committees Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky, is one Republican senator who previously hinted at the possibility of advancing a motion to dismiss the articles of impeachment .

Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas), an adviser to the Senate GOP leadership and a member of the Senate Judiciary and Intelligence committees, on Wednesday said a vote to immediately dismiss articles of impeachment and avoid a trial won't work.

"There's some people talking about trying to stop the bill, dismiss charges basically as soon as they get over here. I think that's not going to happen. That would require 51 votes," Cornyn told reporters Wednesday. "I think it would be hard to find 51 votes to cut the case off before the evidence is presented."

Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.), a staunch Trump ally, is one Republican senator said to be thinking about advancing a motion to dismiss the articles of impeachment even though it is likely to fall well short of the 51 votes needed to pass. A spokesman for Paul on Wednesday declined to comment.

McConnell discounts quick dismissal of Trump impeachment articles: 'We'll have to have a trial'

  McConnell discounts quick dismissal of Trump impeachment articles: 'We'll have to have a trial' Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) brushed aside a question on Wednesday about trying to quickly dismiss the articles of impeachment against President Trump, noting the chamber would have to have a trial."I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell"I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell told reporters.

A Senate trial would be better on any articles of impeachment passed by the House against President Donald Trump because Republicans lack the votes to immediately dismiss the charges , according to Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas.

the House against President Trump Donald John Trump Trump faces high stakes in meeting with Erdoğan amid impeachment drama Democrats worry they don't have right candidate Other Senate Republicans have said a trial is needed, signaling early opposition to supporting a motion to dismiss .

McConnell told GOP colleagues during a lunch meeting last month that any motion to dismiss would be reserved for the impeachment manager and the president's defense team.

During former President Clinton's 1999 Senate trial, late Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.) offered a motion to dismiss the articles of impeachment, but it failed by a vote of 44-56. Every single Democrat except for then-Sen. Russ Feingold (Wis.) voted for the motion to dismiss.

Senate Republicans, even though they control 53 seats, don't think there would be enough unity within their conference to dismiss charges against Trump before the prosecutors and defense have a chance to lay out their arguments and senators have a chance to ask questions and deliberate.

Sen. Mike Braun (R-Ind.) said he wants a sense of closure that would come from a full trial that results in an up-or-down vote on whether to convict or acquit the president on the charges.

Trump files to dismiss lawsuit from Bolton aide on impeachment testimony

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"Under the standing rules of the Senate , the Senate must approve a ' Motion to Proceed' to consider the articles. "I consider any impeachment in the House that doesn't allow us to know who the whistleblower is to be invalid because without the whistleblower complaint we wouldn’t be talking

Key Republican senators told CNN the Senate should conduct a fulsome trial of President Donald Trump -- assuming the House soon sends over articles of impeachment , as expected -- and not try to jam through a motion that would allow them to dismiss the case quickly on a partisan vote.

"I think that if it does come over to the Senate that we should afford due process to the whole journey, where that hasn't been done coming to this point," he said, noting that his GOP colleagues want to provide a counterpoint to what they see as the partisan House proceedings.

Braun said passing a motion to immediately dismiss articles of impeachment "would be, probably, the wrong thing to do" because it would not "clear the slate" of allegations against the president.

"My opinion would be that we've come this far and it probably ought to be heard," he said.

Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) said, "I think we should go through with the process."

Cornyn stated that "the better course would be to let each side have their say and then have the Senate vote and see if they can meet the two-thirds threshold" to convict the president on impeachment articles.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) later told reporters that he has no plans to avoid a trial.

"I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear we'll have to have a trial," said McConnell, who was similarly critical of the motion to dismiss Clinton's 1999 impeachment trial.

McConnell suggests House impeachment timing could push Senate trial to 2020

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Some Republican senators and their advisers are privately discussing whether to pressure GOP leaders to stage a lengthy impeachment trial beginning in January to scramble the Democratic presidential race — potentially keeping a half-dozen candidates in Washington until the eve of the

McConnell has explained impeachment trial rules to his Caucus, but rules can always be changed. Photo: Win McManee/Getty Images. Though the primary focus of attention in the impeachment saga is how the House proceeds toward formal articles of impeachment

"My own view is that we should give people an opportunity to put the case on. The House will have presenters. The president will no doubt be represented by lawyers as well," he added.

Senate Republican Whip John Thune (S.D.) said "people want to fulfill their constitutional responsibility ... We would have to do what the Constitution calls for the Senate to do and that is to hear the arguments, to listen, to take it seriously."

"My guess would be that our members are going to want, I think, [to] at least move forward," he added. "The consensus in our conference is at least that we need to proceed and take seriously the responsibility we have under the Constitution."

Republican senators made their comments Wednesday as two senior State Department officials, William Taylor and George Kent, two men with detailed knowledge of U.S.-Ukraine policy, delivered several hours of testimony before the House Intelligence Committee.

McConnell told reporters that he did not watch the open impeachment hearing Wednesday, but other Republicans, such as Sen. Susan Collins (Maine), are keeping abreast of the developments in the House to prepare for a trial.

"I'm definitely reading materials. I've started reviewing the transcripts. My staff is doing summaries of some of the witnesses. I've asked them to compile each day the major moments in the hearings in the House," Collins said.

Trump's Senate safety net holds firm as Republicans dismiss 'quid pro quo'

  Trump's Senate safety net holds firm as Republicans dismiss 'quid pro quo' Gordon Sondland’s testimony Wednesday upended a key argument Senate Republicans have used to defend President Donald Trump in the impeachment inquiry: no quid pro quo. © Provided by Politico, LLC U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland is sworn in before testifying before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. Now that there’s mounting evidence of precisely that, GOP senators may have to reframe their case. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

Apparently the GOP has figured out one potential upside to this whole impeachment mess. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell speaks as Senator Todd Young, left, and Senator John Barrasso listen during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on Oct.

Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-Texas) said Wednesday he believed that a quick motion to dismiss any articles of impeachment sent to McConnell earlier this month didn’t hesitate to predict that Trump would be acquitted if the Senate held a trial today, and most of his GOP colleagues have

Wednesday was a pivotal day in the House impeachment process, as it marked the first open hearing after weeks of closed-door investigations that Republicans in both chambers had criticized for lacking due process.

Taylor, the top American diplomat to Ukraine, testified that U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland told his staff in July that Trump cared more about spurring an investigation into former Vice President Joe Biden than he cared about Ukraine.

Kent, the deputy assistant secretary of State for European and Eurasian affairs, testified that Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani's effort to "gin up politically motivated investigations" had infected U.S.-Ukraine policy. Kent also described his awareness of a "campaign to smear" former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, whom Trump then recalled.

Democrats hope the public hearing will build public support for impeachment by laying out detailed testimony before a national television audience about what steps Trump took to damage Biden, a front-runner in the Democratic presidential primary.

"It's possible that we can go through this entire public hearing process and nothing will move. It's also possible that things will change," said a Democratic senator who requested anonymity to discuss the political stakes of the House hearings.

Trump wants Senate trial, expects Joe Biden to testify: White House .
Trump wants Senate trial, expects Joe Biden to testify: White House"President Trump wants to have a trial in the Senate because it’s clearly the only chamber where he can expect fairness and receive due process under the Constitution," spokesman Hogan Gidley said in a statement.

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