Politics: Justice Dept. watchdog won’t let witnesses give written feedback on report about FBI’s Russia probe, sparking fears of inaccuracy - - PressFrom - US
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Politics Justice Dept. watchdog won’t let witnesses give written feedback on report about FBI’s Russia probe, sparking fears of inaccuracy

01:30  15 november  2019
01:30  15 november  2019 Source:   washingtonpost.com

Watchdog report on Russia probe nears public release

  Watchdog report on Russia probe nears public release  The Justice Department's watchdog is nearing the release of its report on the early stages of the FBI's Russia investigation, a document likely to revive debate about a politically charged probe that shadowed President Donald Trump's administration from the outset. The inspector general in recent days has invited witnesses and their lawyers who were interviewed for the report to review portions of a draft this week and next, a critical final step toward making the document public, according to multiple people familiar with the process who insisted on anonymity to discuss it.

give written feedback on report about FBI ’ s Russia probe , sparking fears of inaccuracy . of its long-awaited report on the FBI investigation of President Trump’s 2016 campaign that they will not Justice Dept . inspector general invites witnesses to review draft of Russia report , signaling public

WASHINGTON — The Justice Department ’ s internal watchdog intends to complete by May or June his investigation into aspects of the Russia inquiry, including whether law enforcement officials abused their powers in surveilling a former Trump campaign aide

The Justice Department Inspector General’s office has told witnesses who are set to review draft sections of its long-awaited report on the FBI investigation of President Trump’s 2016 campaign that they will not be allowed to submit written feedback — one in a series of unusual restrictions that some fear could make the final document less accurate, people familiar with the matter said.

Michael Horowitz wearing a suit and tie: Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz appears at the launch of the Procurement Collusion Strike Force at the Justice Department earlier this month.© Cliff Owen/AP Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz appears at the launch of the Procurement Collusion Strike Force at the Justice Department earlier this month.

As is the case in most inspector general probes, witnesses are being invited to review draft sections of the report and offer comments and corrections, the people said. But — unlike most cases — they are being told those comments must be conveyed only verbally, the people said.

State Dept. watchdog: Official's firing was case of political retaliation

  State Dept. watchdog: Official's firing was case of political retaliation A career State Department employee was forced out of her job on baseless accusations that she opposed President Trump, was loyal to the Obama administration and was guilty of compromised objectivity due to her Iranian ethnicity, according to an inspector general report released Thursday.Of the several cases reviewed by the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) in its report, released Thursday, it was the only one in which the office determined that political and presidential appointees at the State Department retaliated against a career service employee based on political motivations and other "improper personnel practices.

The Justice Department watchdog briefed a bipartisan group of lawmakers Tuesday on its investigation into the FBI ' s actions during the 2016 election, including its probe into Hillary Clinton's emails.

Several witnesses have been scheduled to review sections of the report dealing with their That could mean public release is imminent, though the witnesses will be allowed to submit feedback — which could spark more Justice Dept . trying to finish report on Russia probe before Thanksgiving.

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Even though Attorney General William P. Barr and other officials have been working in recent weeks to determine what should be redacted from the report as classified or private information, people familiar with the process said that the entire draft document is marked “Top Secret,” so anyone who discusses its contents outside a secure government room could be committing a crime.

Witnesses, they said, are being asked to review their sections in a secure area, after signing nondisclosure agreements, according to people familiar with the matter. The witnesses have also been told they will not be allowed to remove any notes they make about the document, the people said.

DOJ inspector general scheduled to testify about Russia report

  DOJ inspector general scheduled to testify about Russia report Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz will appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee on December 11 to discuss the findings of his report into the opening of the Russia investigation, Chairman Lindsey Graham announced Monday. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); "Mr.

The Justice Department inspector general said Monday that his office is still probing possible misconduct in the FBI ’ s safeguarding of its own secrets — from how former director James B. Comey handled his private memos to whether others under him gave sensitive details to reporters.

Former FBI Director James Comey deviated from bureau norms but there was no evidence his actions before the The report by Horowitz on the FBI ' s handling of a probe into Clinton's emails is due to be released He now represents Trump in Special Counsel Robert Mueller's probe into whether Russia

The moves have left some witnesses concerned their objections might not be recorded precisely and incorporated into the inspector general’s findings, the people said. The witnesses, they said, are also concerned that the process gives the inspector general complete control in characterizing any comments witnesses make — and leaves witnesses with no ability to create a paper trail that might help them show their words were captured inaccurately.

The people spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the political and legal sensitivity of the matter. A spokeswoman for the inspector general declined to comment.

The inspector general is aiming to complete the witness reviews by Nov. 21, although release of the report may wait until after the Thanksgiving holiday, these people said.

Democrats and Republicans alike have eagerly awaited release of Inspector General Michael Horowitz’s report, hopeful that the Justice Department’s internal watchdog will validate their views on the law enforcement investigation that dogged the first two years of Trump’s presidency.

Graham: Report on alleged surveillance abuse in 2016 to be released Dec. 9

  Graham: Report on alleged surveillance abuse in 2016 to be released Dec. 9 Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) announced Wednesday that a report on allegations of surveillance abuse by the Obama administration during the 2016 presidential election will be released on Dec. 9. © Greg Nash Graham: Report on alleged surveillance abuse in 2016 to be released Dec. 9 "It'll be Dec. 9, you'll get the report," Graham said on Fox News. "That's locked." require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

Michael E. Horowitz, the Justice Department ’ s inspector general, plans to issue on Thursday a highly anticipated report about the F.B.I.’ s handling of the Hillary “What is taking so long with the Inspector General’ s Report on Crooked Hillary and Slippery James Comey,” he wrote on Twitter this month.

A report on James Comey' s public disclosures on Clinton' s use of a private email server is expected to be issued next month. WASHINGTON, April 19 (Reuters) - A long-awaited U. S . Justice Department internal watchdog report on former FBI chief James Comey' s public disclosures on Hillary Clinton' s

Conservatives have alleged a medley of wrongdoing occurred during the investigation, which would eventually be taken over by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, and they are likely to seize on any criticism that Horowitz directs at those involved in the probe. Some Trump supporters have referred to the investigation as an attempted “coup.”

Democrats, meanwhile, are hopeful Horowitz will disprove various conspiracy theories that have been offered about the case, and refute Trump’s assertion that Mueller’s probe was a “witch hunt” tainted by political bias against the president.

The report’s release is also likely to be a major credibility test for Barr, who has previously suggested impropriety on the part of the FBI. With Horowitz’s review ongoing, Barr earlier this year tapped a federal prosecutor in Connecticut — U.S. Attorney John Durham — to separately explore whether the intelligence activities aimed at people tied to the Trump campaign were lawful. Durham’s investigation is exploring potential crimes, officials have said.

Barr said this week that public release of the inspector general report is “imminent,” though he provided no specific date. People familiar with the matter said witnesses are scheduled this week and next to review drafts and offer feedback — generally the last step the inspector general takes before making the document public.

It is unclear what Horowitz has concluded. Witnesses have been asked about an array of topics, though investigators seem keenly focused on the FBI and Justice Department’s applications to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to monitor the communications of a former Trump campaign adviser, Carter Page, people familiar with the matter said.

matt.zapotosky@washpost.com

devlin.barrett@washpost.com

'It’s only one side’s perspective': Carter Page slams FISA report as 'sloppy' .
Former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page is condemning Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz's investigation on alleged government surveillance abuses ahead of the release of its findings. © Provided by MediaDC: Washington Newspaper Publishing Company, Inc.Leaks last week about the forthcoming report on the FBI's use of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act to wiretap Page, an American citizen who was suspected to be a Russian asset but was never charged, show the DOJ watchdog found errors were made. Ultimately, there was no abuse of power by top officials due to bias against President Trump.

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