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Politics Who's scheduled to publicly testify next in Trump's impeachment hearings

04:25  16 november  2019
04:25  16 november  2019 Source:   businessinsider.com

White House to add two aides to lead impeachment messaging

  White House to add two aides to lead impeachment messaging The White House is expected to add a pair of aides tasked with leading its impeachment communications team as the House prepares to go public with its inquiry into President Trump.Two officials confirmed to The Hill that former Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi and former Treasury spokesman Tony Sayegh will join the White House communications staff "to work on proactive impeachment messaging and other special projects as they arise."Two officials confirmed to The Hill that former Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi and former Treasury spokesman Tony Sayegh will join the White House communications staff "to work on proactive impeachment messaging and other special projects as they arise.

Who ' s scheduled to publicly testify next in Trump ' s impeachment hearings . The impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump has officially moved into its public phase, and witnesses are beginning to testify in open session before the House Intelligence Committee, House Committee on

Here’ s what you need to know A new witness who overheard another Trump phone call will testify behind closed doors. Before then, catch up on some important background on the impeachment inquiry. to Ukraine, will be the sole witness in the second day of impeachment hearings on Friday.

The impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump has officially moved into its public phase, and witnesses are beginning to testify in open session before the House Intelligence Committee, House Committee on Foreign Affairs, and House Oversight Committee, who are jointly pursuing the inquiry.

Donald Trump, Gordon Sondland are posing for a picture© Associated Press

On Wednesday, the public phase of the inquiry kicked off with the testimony of acting US ambassador to Ukraine Bill Taylor and State Department official George Kent.

The two diplomats corroborated previous witness testimony that Trump and members of his administration used a $400 million military aid package to Ukraine as leverage to pressure its government to announce investigations that would be politically favorable to Trump.

Democrats warn State Dept against punishing individuals who testify in impeachment hearings

  Democrats warn State Dept against punishing individuals who testify in impeachment hearings A group of Senate Democrats is urging top State Department officials to commit that individuals who testify as part of the House impeachment inquiry hearings won't face retaliation over their remarks.Democrats on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, led by Sen. Bob Menendez (D-N.J.), the committee's ranking member, sent a letter on Tuesday to Deputy Secretary of State John Sullivan and Undersecretary of State Brian Bulatao urging them to publicly commit to protecting department officials who testify from any potential professional blowback.

Marie Yovanovitch testified that the State Department wouldn’t publicly defend her because officials feared the threat of a Trump tweet. SEE ALSO: Who ' s scheduled to publicly testify next in Trump ' s impeachment hearings . NOW WATCH: More: marie yovanovitch Donald Trump Twitter

Trump impeachment hearings : Schedule , who ’ s testifying , what to know. Next will be George Kent, the deputy assistant secretary of state for European and Eurasian affairs Trump also pushed for a probe into the 2016 election, believing it was Ukraine and not Russia that meddled in the contest.

And on Friday, former US ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, a career diplomat, gave gripping testimony detailing how Trump and his personal attorney Rudy Giuliani pushed her out of her position earlier this year after over three decades of service in the State Department.

Now, the House committees have announced that nine more diplomats and national security officials - many of whom have already appeared to testify behind closed-doors - will testify publicly in the next few days.

Here's the schedule of who is testifying in the next week.

This schedule will be periodically updated as the Committees announce public testimony for more witnesses.

  • Tuesday, November 19:
    • State Department official and advisor to Vice President Mike Pence Jennifer Williams and Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, an expert on Eastern European affairs on the National Security Council will testify in the morning.
    • Former US special representative to Ukraine Kurt Volker and former NSC staffer Tim Morrison will testify publicly in the afternoon.
  • Wednesday, November 20:
    • US ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland will testify in the morning.
    • Pentagon official Laura Cooper- whose closed-door testimony on October 23 was stormed by a group of 30 GOP lawmakers - and Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs David Hale will appear in the afternoon.
  • Thursday, November 21:
    • Former NSC senior director for Russian and Eurasian affairs Fiona Hill will testify publicly before the committees.

The impeachment inquiry all started with an anonymous whistleblower's complaint, turned over to Congress in early September, that Trump was "using the power of his office to solicit interference from a foreign country" in the 2020 US election in a series of events culminating in a July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

13.1 million TV viewers watch opening day of U.S. impeachment hearings

  13.1 million TV viewers watch opening day of U.S. impeachment hearings The first televised hearing of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump on Wednesday attracted 13.1 million viewers across six broadcast and cable networks, according to preliminary ratings data released by CNN on Thursday. © Getty Images Charge d'Affaires at the US embassy in Ukraine Bill Taylor (L) and Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Europe and Eurasia George Kent (R) are sworn in to testify before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on the impeachment inquiry into US President Donald J. Trump, on Capitol Hill in Washington, on November, 13 November 2019.

As public hearings began, William B. Taylor Jr., the top American diplomat in Ukraine, said he was told WASHINGTON — The House of Representatives opened historic impeachment hearings on Investigators scheduled depositions with David Holmes, an official in the United States Embassy in

Yovanovitch testified behind closed doors that Trump and Giuliani wanted her removed since the summer of 2018 because she refused to let Giuliani use the US Embassy in Ukraine in his efforts to obtain SEE ALSO: Who ' s scheduled to publicly testify next in Trump ' s impeachment hearings .

The complaint specifically charged that Trump's pressure on the Ukrainian government to investigate alleged corruption from former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter came days after he withheld a nearly $400 million military-aid package to Ukraine that Congress had already appropriated.

The White House's notes of the call confirm Trump brought up how the US does "a lot for Ukraine." Immediately after, Trump asked Zelensky to do him a "favor, though" by investigating Biden and a debunked conspiracy theory that Ukraine interfered in the 2016 election to benefit Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and was somehow in possession of a Democratic National Committee server.

In the past month, multiple diplomats and national security officials have testified that Trump and Giuliani explicitly conditioned both releasing the aid and inviting Zelensky to a meeting at the White House on Ukraine putting out at a statement announcing investigations into the Bidens and the 2016 election.


'Fox & Friends' co-host Brian Kilmeade urges Trump not to tweet during impeachment hearings .
"Fox & Friends" co-host Brian Kilmeade on Tuesday urged President Trump not to tweet during public impeachment hearings. "The president should just ignore this whole thing. Don't tweet during it. Don't get outraged over it. It ticks you off," Kilmeade said on air. "There's so much for him to do — I just think that let these guys, like [Rep.] Doug Collins (R-Ga.) and company, fight it out and keep it on the straight and narrow, from the Republican perspective."Fox & Friends asks President Trump not to tweet during today's impeachment hearings: "The president should just ignore this whole thing.

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