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Politics 'A Few' Senate Republicans Believe Trump's Ukraine Actions Are 'Demonstrably Impeachable,' Senator Says

00:22  06 december  2019
00:22  06 december  2019 Source:   newsweek.com

It's not about Ukraine

  It's not about Ukraine The impeachment of President Trump isn't about Ukraine. It's about America. Let's put this in the simplest possible terms: Trump tried to steal the 2020 presidential election. And he did so by abusing the power of his office to undermine one of his chief political rivals. It's a simple, easily digestible message that spells out the stakes of impeachment. Democrats should be hammering it home at every opportunity, like Talking Points Memo's JoshThe impeachment of President Trump isn't about Ukraine. It's about America.

A law professor selected by Trump ’ s fellow Republicans said that the impeachment inquiry lacked testimony from people with direct knowledge of They have denied wrongdoing. The three professors chosen by the Democrats made clear they believed Trump ’ s actions constituted impeachable

A law professor selected by Trump ’ s fellow Republicans said that the impeachment inquiry lacked testimony from people with direct knowledge of They have denied wrongdoing. The three professors chosen by the Democrats made clear they believed Trump ’ s actions constituted impeachable

Senator Chris Coons has said that "a few" of his Republican colleagues in the Senate believe that President Donald Trump's actions are "demonstrably impeachable," but are also concerned about the political implications of turning against the president.

Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie sitting in front of a flag: President Donald Trump speaks as Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy looks on during a meeting in New York on September 25 on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly© SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty President Donald Trump speaks as Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy looks on during a meeting in New York on September 25 on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly

Coons, a Democrat from Delaware, made the remarks during a Thursday interview with CNN, in which he discussed how a Senate trial of the president could play out. The congressman noted that Republicans will have significant control over how the proceedings move forward, as the upper chamber of Congress is currently controlled by a GOP majority.

Senate confirms Brouillette, former Ford lobbyist, as energy secretary

  Senate confirms Brouillette, former Ford lobbyist, as energy secretary The U.S. Senate on Monday confirmed Dan Brouillette, a former top lobbyist for Ford Motor Co who believes fossil fuels will power a large part of world energy needs for many decades, as President Donald Trump's second energy secretary. The Republican-controlled Senate confirmed Brouillette 70-15. Brouillette will replace Rick Perry, who stepped down on Sunday while at the center of Trump's impeachment probe in the U.S. House of Representatives for his role as one of the "three amigos" who ran a side foreign policy in Ukraine, under Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani.

Constitutional scholars say Trump committed several impeachable offenses. Collins said that House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) “must A top White House official said Wednesday that Trump would like to see a full trial and witnesses in the Senate chamber should the

A fourth witness, called by Republicans , said that might be the case, but Mr. Gerhardt and the two other legal experts called by Democrats said they agreed that Mr. Trump ’ s actions in the Ukraine and Russia matters They also agreed that Mr. Trump ’ s stonewalling of Congress was itself impeachable .

"We will be relying on a small number of Republicans who are pushing back ... and recognize that impeachment is a serious, significant constitutional moment," the senator said. "There are, I believe, a few Republicans who recognize that what President Trump did here was demonstrably impeachable, but are very concerned about the political consequences for them and their party."

"I think a full blown defense that says 'this is a hoax' and 'there's absolutely nothing to it,' will be difficult for them to sustain," Coons argued.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, announced on Thursday morning that she had asked the House Judiciary Committee to draw up formal articles of impeachment against Trump. The Democratic-led inquiry was formally launched in late September after revelations came to light about Trump's efforts to pressure Ukrainian leaders to announce investigations into debunked conspiracy theories that could damage his domestic political rivals.

Lindsey Graham says he's '1,000% confident' Russia meddled in 2016 US election -- not Ukraine

  Lindsey Graham says he's '1,000% confident' Russia meddled in 2016 US election -- not Ukraine Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham on Tuesday said he is "1,000% confident" that Russia, not Ukraine, meddled in the 2016 US presidential election, breaking from President Donald Trump and others in his party who have pushed the discredited conspiracy theory. © Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images US Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) "It was the Russians. I'm 1,000% confident that the hack of the DNC was by Russian operatives, no one else," the South Carolina senator told reporters on Capitol Hill. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

He said at the outset that he had not voted for Trump – and yet Republicans deferred to his testimony opposing impeachment repeatedly. “The president wants his case made fully in the Senate ,” Ueland said after meeting with GOP senators on Capitol Hill on Wednesday.

He said at the outset that he had not voted for Trump – and yet Republicans deferred to his testimony opposing impeachment repeatedly. “The president wants his case made fully in the Senate ,” Ueland said after meeting with GOP senators on Capitol Hill on Wednesday.

After the articles of impeachment are drawn up, it is widely believed they will be approved by the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives. After that, the process will move to the Senate, which would prepare a trial for the president, overseen by Chief Supreme Court Justice John Roberts, that could potentially lead to Trump's removal from office.

However, most analysts believe it is highly unlikely that the Republican-controlled chamber will vote to expel the president from the White House. A two-thirds majority is required to do so, and that would mean 20 Republicans—as well as every Democrat and independent—in the Senate would have to support the motion. There is also the possibility any senator could call for the dismissal of all charges against the president before a full trial is conducted. Only a simple majority would be required to pass such a motion.

Trump says impeachment report is "a joke"

  Trump says impeachment report is Trump says impeachment report is "a joke"LONDON — U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday that the Democrats' impeachment report was a joke with no merit and complained that a hearing had been scheduled while he was out of the country.

A fourth witness, called by Republicans , said that might be the case, but Mr. Gerhardt and the two other legal experts called by Democrats said they agreed that Mr. Trump ’ s actions in the Ukraine and Russia matters They also agreed that Mr. Trump ’ s stonewalling of Congress was itself impeachable .

Senator Lambie says support has been a hard decision to make. White House officials present at the Republican lunch on Capitol Hill – Ueland, White House counsel Pat Cipollone Gerhardt rejected the latter argument, saying Trump ’ s “refusal to comply with the subpoenas is an independent event

Prominent GOP consultant Mike Murphy told MSNBC at the end of September that a Republican senator had told him "if it was a secret vote, 30 Republican senators would vote to impeach Trump." Former Republican Senator Jeff Flake later told a reporter for Slate that "there would be at least 35," not 30.

Despite the reported opposition to the president among Senate Republicans, only a few have voiced public criticism of Trump's actions towards Ukraine, the issue at the heart of the recently-concluded impeachment inquiry. Senator Mitt Romney of Utah was the most prominent Republican to do so early on, when the Ukraine revelations first came to light.

"It's deeply troubling," he told reporters in late September.

"If the President asked or pressured Ukraine's president to investigate his political rival, either directly or through his personal attorney, it would be troubling in the extreme," he also tweeted around the same time.

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Lindsey Graham invites Rudy Giuliani to Judiciary panel to discuss recent Ukraine visit .
"Rudy, if you want to come and tell us what you found, I'll be glad to talk to you,” Lindsey Graham says.In an interview airing on Face the Nation Sunday, the Senate Judiciary Committee chairman said that Giuliani, who is serving as the president’s personal attorney, could appear before his committee separately from the impending Senate impeachment trial.

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