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Politics Democrats plot week ahead for impeachment proceedings

17:20  08 december  2019
17:20  08 december  2019 Source:   abcnews.go.com

Poll: Majority of Republicans think Trump a better president than Lincoln

  Poll: Majority of Republicans think Trump a better president than Lincoln A majority of Republicans believe President Trump is a better leader than Abraham Lincoln, who guided the nation through the Civil War. © Provided by Washington ExaminerThe Economist and YouGov conducted a poll from Nov. 24-26 of 1,500 American adults. In the wide-ranging poll, researchers asked Americans to compare Trump to past U.S. presidents.Fifty-three percent of Republicans said that Trump is a better president than Lincoln. For Democrats and Independents, Lincoln is considered to have been the better president with 94% and 78%, respectively.

Roughly two dozen Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee, dressed casually for the weekend, gathered in the grand hearing room in the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill Saturday for the first of two days of preparation ahead of a crucial week in impeachment proceedings against

Roughly two dozen Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee, dressed casually for the weekend, gathered in the grand hearing room in the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill Saturday for the first of two days of preparation ahead of a crucial week in impeachment proceedings against

Roughly two dozen Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee, dressed casually for the weekend, gathered in the grand hearing room in the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill Saturday for the first of two days of preparation ahead of a crucial week in impeachment proceedings against the president.

Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump answers questions from the media before departing the White House on Dec. 7, 2019, in Washington, D.C.© Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images President Donald Trump answers questions from the media before departing the White House on Dec. 7, 2019, in Washington, D.C.

Working over pizza with Democratic lawyers and aides, they prepared for Monday's hearing with majority and minority lawyers who will argue for and against impeachment, using the evidence gathered by the committees.

Rep. Doug Collins on House Judiciary Committee calls for Adam Schiff to testify

  Rep. Doug Collins on House Judiciary Committee calls for Adam Schiff to testify The top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee on Sunday called for House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff to testify before the panel in its impeachment hearing. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Georgia Rep. Doug Collins, the ranking Republican on the Judiciary Committee, is the latest ally of President Donald Trump to call for Schiff, who has been leading House Democrats' impeachment inquiry into the President and Ukraine, to provide testimony.

Pirro: Democrat Impeachment Effort Guarantees Trump Reelection in 2020Today at 12:20 AMwww.breitbart.com. House Judiciary Committee releases report outlining grounds for impeachment ahead of hearingYesterday at 3:57 PMwww.foxnews.com. Do Democrats have enough evidence for

Of Democrats hesitant to vote in favor of impeachment , she said her team would “catch them up.” In light of the facts uncovered so far, she added Ms. Pelosi limited advance notice of her announcement to a tight circle of advisers, but there have been clear signs this week that Democrats were preparing

A Democratic official told reporters on Saturday that Democrats intend to use Monday's hearing to make their "theory of the case" against President Donald Trump and his abuse of power.

The hearing will spotlight both Democratic and Republican attorneys from both the House Intelligence and House Judiciary committees, who will present evidence they gathered during previous public and closed-door hearings. Those hearings have focused on whether Trump withheld military aid and a potential White House meeting to Ukraine in exchange for the launch of an investigation into former Vice President Joe Biden and his son, Hunter.

'Ramblings of a basement blogger': White House press secretary slams Schiff impeachment report

  'Ramblings of a basement blogger': White House press secretary slams Schiff impeachment report White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham tore into the impeachment report released by House Democrats on the Intelligence Committee. © Provided by Washington ExaminerThe report, released on Tuesday, accuses President Trump of withholding almost $400 million in military aid to Ukraine in exchange for politically expedient investigations, including into rival Joe Biden. Grisham, 43, ripped Rep. Adam Schiff, who is the chairman of the committee, in a statement released shortly after the report was made public.

“The misguided Democrat impeachment strategy is meant to appease their rabid, extreme, leftist base, but will only serve to embolden and energize President Ms. Pelosi’s announcement came amid a groundswell in favor of impeachment among Democrats that has intensified since late last week

The House has a jam-packed schedule for impeachment hearings this week . One America's Chanel Rion is at the White House with more on what to expect.

Majority counsel Barry Burke and minority counsel Stephen Castor will appear before the Judiciary Committee, while Castor will again appear, now alongside majority counsel Daniel Goldman, before the Intelligence Committee.

As members gathered for their Saturday prep session, they were joined by committee staff and lawyers, as well as legal expert Laurence Tribe, a constitutional scholar and Harvard Law School professor who has been advising House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Democrats. Tribe, according to sources, fielded questions on impeachment before Democrats began their mock hearing session.

MORE: Trump to Democrats: 'If you are going to impeach me, do it now, fast'

Democrats, according to the official, plan to argue on Monday that Trump's use of his office for personal political gain ahead of the election represents the "framers' nightmare," by acting in a way that "betrays our national security and corrupts our elections using a foreign power."

House Democrat says he plans to vote against all articles of impeachment

  House Democrat says he plans to vote against all articles of impeachment Rep. Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey, one of two Democrats to vote against formalizing the impeachment inquiry, said he plans to vote against all the articles of impeachment "unless there's something that I haven't seen, haven't heard before."Rep. Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey, one of two Democrats to vote against formalizing the impeachment inquiry, said he plans to vote against all the articles of impeachment "unless there's something that I haven't seen, haven't heard before.

House Democrats moved aggressively to draw up formal articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Thursday, with Speaker Nancy But more centrist and moderate Democrats , those lawmakers who are most at risk of political fallout from the impeachment proceedings , prefer to stick

While some Democrats have debated the scope of what articles of impeachment ought to be adopted by the House Judiciary Committee, members present said that was not an issue of discussion Wednesday morning. Instead, Pelosi said that task would be left to the investigating committees

They will argue that Trump's actions were part of a "repeated pattern," and that the Ukraine episode is important because it represents a "future pattern," highlighting the urgency of moving quickly to impeach the president ahead of 2020.

Pramila Jayapal, Jamie Raskin are posing for a picture: Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., joined at left by Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., listens to testimony from legal scholars during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on impeachment on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019.© J. Scott Applewhite/AP Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., joined at left by Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., listens to testimony from legal scholars during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on impeachment on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019.

Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., said after Saturday's prep session that they are using it to put "law and facts together to begin to think about the next step."

"Speaker Pelosi has charged us with writing articles of impeachment and we're in the process of exploring every possible dimension of that process," Raskin said.

MORE: Trump campaign runs misleading anti-impeachment Facebook ads

In terms of what to expect on Monday, Raskin described the process as a "scrupulously equal, fair, open and transparent" process.

Republicans on the committee have argued that Trump’s actions did not constitute a threat to national security or a quid pro quo because, among other things, the president was rightfully concerned about corruption in Ukraine and because Ukrainian officials did not know aid was being withheld.

White House tells House Democrats to end impeachment inquiry, less than an hour before deadline for Trump to agree to participate

  White House tells House Democrats to end impeachment inquiry, less than an hour before deadline for Trump to agree to participate The response came as little surprise. Throughout the impeachment proceedings, the White House has blocked witnesses from testifying, declined to provide documents demanded by Democrats and did not send lawyers to the Judiciary Committee’s first impeachment hearing on Wednesday. Instead, the White House has largely looked to the Republican-controlled Senate to wage a full defense of Trump, who is accused of abusing the powers of the presidency when he pressured Ukraine to investigate former vice president Joe Biden and his son, Hunter, as well as an unfounded theory that Kyiv conspired with Democrats to interfere in the 2016 presidenti

articles of impeachment . Democrats currently control the House. Less than a majority of the. House votes to impeach . But it is not clear whether that step is strictly necessary, because impeachment proceedings against other officials, like a former federal judge in 1989, began at the committee level.

House Democrats are preparing a flurry of subpoenas in the face of the Trump administration's stonewalling of their impeachment investigation, amid a new debate within their caucus over holding a vote to formally authorize the inquiry in order to call the White House's bluff

On Friday night, the House Intelligence Committee formally transmitted its 300-page Ukraine report to the Judiciary Committee for consideration in impeachment proceedings. The Judiciary Committee majority staff also released their own report, "Constitutional Grounds for Presidential Impeachment," updating a similar report from the 1998 Clinton impeachment proceedings on the constitutional grounds for impeachment.

Jerrold Nadler, Doug Collins sitting at a desk: House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., left, gives his closing statement as ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., listens during the House Judiciary Committee hearing on impeachment on Capitol Hill on Dec. 4, 2019.© Alex Brandon/AP House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., left, gives his closing statement as ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., listens during the House Judiciary Committee hearing on impeachment on Capitol Hill on Dec. 4, 2019.

"The Framers worst nightmare is what we are facing in this very moment. President Trump abused his power, betrayed our national security, and corrupted our elections, all for personal gain," Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., said in a statement. "The Constitution details only one remedy for this misconduct: impeachment."

Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., the ranking member on the Judiciary panel, called on Nadler to postpone the hearing after Democrats' "last-minute" transmission of evidence, claiming it showed "just how far Democrats have gone to pervert basic fairness."

No additional hearings are scheduled after Monday, but Democrats are expected to introduce and consider multiple articles charging Trump with abuse of power and obstruction as early as next week -- ahead of a potential vote on the House floor the week before Christmas.

Americans steadfastly divided over impeachment as vote nears .
WASHINGTON (AP) — As the U.S. House of Representatives prepares to take a historic vote on the impeachment of President Donald Trump, the American public is following along, steadfast in its views. Many polls since House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the start of an impeachment inquiry on Sept. 24 show that Americans are closely divided over whether Trump should be removed from office. Heated public hearings on network television that reached millions of Americans alongside a White House on the defensive have done little to move public opinion on the issue.

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