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Politics Trump calls for 'outright dismissal' but GOP senator says there aren't enough votes

12:41  14 january  2020
12:41  14 january  2020 Source:   abcnews.go.com

McConnell says he has enough Republican votes to begin Trump's trial without witnesses

  McConnell says he has enough Republican votes to begin Trump's trial without witnesses The process cannot get started until Nancy Pelosi sends the House-passed articles to the Senate."We have the votes once the impeachment trial has begun to pass a resolution — essentially the same as, very similar to, the 100-to-nothing vote in the Clinton trial," McConnell told reporters.

Senate Republicans are downplaying President Donald Trump 's weekend tweet calling for an " outright dismissal " of the charges against him. Instead, they have endorsed a vote of acquittal, believing it sends a stronger message. Several Republican senators are now debating whether or not

Before he called for a dismissal of the case, Mr. Trump appeared to be piqued by Ms. Pelosi. He suggested on Twitter questions for Ms. Pelosi to Republican senators have already challenged the speed and exhaustiveness of the House’s inquiry, and questions about the strength of the evidence it

Senate Republicans are downplaying President Donald Trump's weekend tweet calling for an "outright dismissal" of the charges against him.

Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump talks to reporters before departing from the South Lawn of the White House, Jan. 13, 2020.© Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images President Donald Trump talks to reporters before departing from the South Lawn of the White House, Jan. 13, 2020.

Sen. Roy Blunt of Missouri, a member of Senate leadership, told reporters on Monday that the Senate Republican caucus simply doesn't have the votes.

Roy Blunt standing in front of a fence: Sen. Roy Blunt arrives for a briefing on developments with Iran at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Jan. 8, 2020.© Alexander Drago/Reuters, FILE Sen. Roy Blunt arrives for a briefing on developments with Iran at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Jan. 8, 2020.

"The argument for an argument to dismiss is: there was one in the Clinton rules," Blunt said, referring to the impeachment of President Bill Clinton. "But I think I'm safe in saying there's almost no interest in motion to dismiss, certainly there aren't 51 votes for a motion to dismiss."

Trump, Shifting Arguments, Urges Swift Dismissal of Impeachment Charges

  Trump, Shifting Arguments, Urges Swift Dismissal of Impeachment Charges WASHINGTON — President Trump on Sunday injected fresh instability into final preparations for the Senate’s impeachment trial, suggesting that senators should dismiss the House’s charges of high crimes and misdemeanors against him outright rather than dignifying them with a full tribunal. That unexpected statement, arriving amid a flurry of tweets, not only appeared to put the president at odds with Republican Senate leaders moving toward a full trial but also contradicted Mr. Trump’s own words from just hours earlier, when he argued for a trial that would include as witnesses Democratic House leaders who are prosecuting him.

51 Senators are needed to vote in favor of dismissing Trump articles of impeachment, the GOP impeachment against President Trump , who endorsed an " outright dismissal " over the weekend. Certainly there aren ' t 51 votes for a motion to dismiss ," Blunt, the No. 4 Senate Republican, told But Trump revived talk of trying to dismiss the articles over the weekend, saying the Senate was

President Donald Trump says the Senate should simply dismiss the impeachment case against him, an extraordinary suggestion as the House prepares "Many believe that by the Senate giving credence to a trial" over charges he calls a hoax, Trump tweeted, "rather than an outright dismissal , it gives

MORE: Pelosi does not rule out possibility of subpoenaing testimony if Senate skips witnesses

Over the weekend, Trump argued that a trial would give Democrats a "credibility that it otherwise does not have" and urged Republicans to dismiss the charges against him.

Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump talks to reporters before departing from the South Lawn of the White House, Jan. 13, 2020.© Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images President Donald Trump talks to reporters before departing from the South Lawn of the White House, Jan. 13, 2020.

"Many believe that by the Senate giving credence to a trial based on the no evidence, no crime, read the transcripts, 'no pressure' Impeachment Hoax, rather than an outright dismissal, it gives the partisan Democrat Witch Hunt credibility that it otherwise does not have," Trump tweeted. "I agree!"

But Republicans, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, have said that dismissing the articles of impeachment against Trump is not a likely scenario. Instead, they have endorsed a vote of acquittal, believing it sends a stronger message.

Senate trial expected to start January 21

  Senate trial expected to start January 21 The trial is expected to last three to five weeks.The House is expected to send over the articles on Wednesday or Thursday of this week, after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi delayed the transmission. There aren't enough votes for an outright dismissal of the articles of impeachment, as Mr. Trump had hoped.

Certainly there aren ' t 51 votes for a motion to dismiss ," Blunt, the No. 4 Senate Republican, told But Trump revived talk of trying to dismiss the articles over the weekend, saying the Republicans are still crafting the rules resolution for the Trump trial, but some GOP senators have suggested they

Senator Lindsey Graham, a staunch Trump ally, said Republicans should hold firm and reject There is a another pitfall for Democrats. A successful vote to extend the trial for witnesses could potentially Republican Senator Jim Risch of Idaho said they’d first have to summon the president for his defense

Several Republican senators are now debating whether or not a "motion to dismiss" should even be included in the rules resolution McConnell is currently drafting, which will determine the procedure senators will abide by during Trump's impeachment trial. During Clinton's trial, the rules resolution included a motion to dismiss, but it ultimately failed.

MORE: McConnell says he wants bipartisan agreement ahead of Senate trial

"Our members, generally, are not interested in a motion to dismiss. They think both sides need to be heard. They believe the president needs to be heard, for the first time, in a fair setting," Blunt said.

Other Republican senators concur.

Sen. Susan Collins of Maine told reporters on Monday, "I would vote against a motion to dismiss immediately. Absolutely."

MORE: Pelosi plans to send impeachment articles to Senate

Utah Sen. Mitt Romney said, "I will not be supporting a motion to dismiss."

John Bolton’s testimony looks increasingly likely, but it’s not a done deal

  John Bolton’s testimony looks increasingly likely, but it’s not a done deal Parsing the public comments of key lawmakers.That question is starting to come into focus. The idea that the Senate will quickly dismiss the impeachment articles and move on, as Trump has suggested, apparently isn’t going to happen — that means we can now turn to other matters like Bolton.

Trump first said Sunday it’s Pelosi and House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff who should both Some GOP senators want to turn the impeachment trial away from the Democrats’ case and Susan Collins of Maine, said last week she was in talks with GOP colleagues on a process that

Republicans are still crafting the rules resolution for the Trump trial, but some GOP senators have suggested they will not include a specific motion to dismiss in the resolution. That would not, according to aides and senators , prevent a senator from trying to make a motion to dismiss during the trial.

Other senators, while they're not commenting on how they'd vote on a motion to dismiss, have said multiple times now that they want a fair trial that allows for the House impeachment managers and Trump's legal team to make their case before the Senate chamber and the American people.

Mitch McConnell et al. standing next to a man in a suit and tie: A reporter asks questions as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) leaves the Senate floor and walks to his office at the Capitol, Jan. 8, 2020, in Washington, D.C.© Drew Angerer/Getty Images A reporter asks questions as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) leaves the Senate floor and walks to his office at the Capitol, Jan. 8, 2020, in Washington, D.C.

According to several senators, McConnell is finalizing the rules resolution by early this week, and it's likely he will release the rules resolution once the articles of impeachment have been transmitted to the Senate.

On Friday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that the House would vote on a resolution this week to name impeachment managers, a move that would trigger the delivery of impeachment articles to the Senate. She's meeting with her caucus on Tuesday morning to take the temperature of her colleagues before making a final determination on the timing to formally send the articles.

ABC News' John Parkinson contributed to this report.

Schumer: Dems will 'force votes on witnesses and documents' in Trump impeachment trial .
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., vowed Sunday evening to "force votes on witnesses and documents" in the impeachment trial against President Trump starting this week, and suggested that Republicans were engaged in a cover-up to block Democrats from doing so. © FoxNews.com President Trump and New York Democratic Senator Schumer comment on the upcoming impeachment trial. During a news conference, Schumer questioned why Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.

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