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Politics Murkowski wants to hear case before deciding on witnesses

10:57  19 january  2020
10:57  19 january  2020 Source:   msn.com

Senate Republicans soften on impeachment witnesses

  Senate Republicans soften on impeachment witnesses Senate Republicans are backing off initial, ironclad opposition to witnesses in the upcoming trial to adjudicate two articles of impeachment against President Trump. © Provided by Washington ExaminerAs House Democrats approved charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress in mid-December, most Senate Republicans signaled they were inclined to conclude an impeachment trial without witness testimony immediately following arguments from the defense and prosecution.

Alaska U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski said she's comfortable waiting to decide if more information is needed as part of the Senate's impeachment trial until after hearing arguments from House managers and attorneys for President Donald Trump and questions from members.

Lisa Murkowski said she's comfortable waiting to decide if more information is needed as part of the Senate's impeachment trial until after hearing The Republican said Saturday she wants to make sure there's a process that allows senators to “really hear the case ” and ask questions “ before we

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Alaska U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski said she's comfortable waiting to decide if more information is needed as part of the Senate's impeachment trial until after hearing arguments from House managers and attorneys for President Donald Trump and questions from members.

FILE - In this Dec. 19, 2019, file photo, Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, chair of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, speaks during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Murkowski said she's comfortable waiting to decide if more information is needed as part of the Senate's impeachment trial until after hearing arguments from House managers and attorneys for President Donald Trump and questions from members. Murkowski spoke to reporters Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, from Anchorage ahead of Senate impeachment trial proceedings expected to begin Tuesday. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)© Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this Dec. 19, 2019, file photo, Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, chair of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, speaks during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Murkowski said she's comfortable waiting to decide if more information is needed as part of the Senate's impeachment trial until after hearing arguments from House managers and attorneys for President Donald Trump and questions from members. Murkowski spoke to reporters Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, from Anchorage ahead of Senate impeachment trial proceedings expected to begin Tuesday. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

The Republican said Saturday she wants to make sure there's a process that allows senators to “really hear the case” and ask questions “before we make that determination as to, what more do we need. I don't know what more we need until I've been given the base case.”

John Bolton’s testimony looks increasingly likely, but it’s not a done deal

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Murkowski said she's comfortable waiting to decide if more information is needed as part of the Senate's impeachment trial until after hearing The Republican said Saturday she wants to make sure there's a process that allows senators to “really hear the case ” and ask questions “ before we

Lisa Murkowski said she's comfortable waiting to decide if more information is needed as part of the Senate's impeachment trial until after hearing The Republican said Saturday she wants to make sure there's a process that allows senators to “really hear the case ” and ask questions “ before we

Murkowski spoke to reporters from Anchorage ahead of Senate impeachment trial proceedings expected to begin Tuesday.

If Democrats try to add certain witnesses to an organizing resolution, Murkowski said she expects Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell would move to table such a request and that she would support a tabling motion.

“Because what I’ve worked hard to do is make sure that we have a process that will allow for that determination” — whether witnesses or documents are needed, she said. “But I want to have that at a point where I know whether or not I'm going to need it.”

Rand Paul threatens fellow Republicans with explosive witness votes

  Rand Paul threatens fellow Republicans with explosive witness votes The Kentucky senator is vowing to squeeze vulnerable GOP incumbents if they side with Democrats during Trump's impeachment trial.The Kentucky Republican is occasionally at odds with Trump, from his strike against Iranian General Qassem Soleimani to his national emergency to build his border wall. But when it comes to impeachment, Paul is taking the hardest line possible in Trump’s favor.

Lisa Murkowski says she's comfortable waiting to decide if more information is needed as part of the Senate's impeachment trial of President Donald The Republican said Saturday she wants to make sure there's a process that allows senators to “really hear the case ” and ask questions “ before we

Alaska U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski said she's comfortable waiting to decide if more information is needed as part of the Senate's impeachment trial until after hearing arguments from House managers and attorneys for President Donald Trump and questions from members.The

She said there are political pressures “on all of us” but said her responsibility is “not to focus on the politics of where we are but a recognition that we are in the midst of an infrequent and in many ways extraordinary process that the Constitution allows for, and I’m going to take my constitutional obligations very, very seriously."

Regardless of how one views the House's handling of the impeachment process, the matter is now before the Senate, she said, adding later she does not want the proceedings to become a "circus."

Slideshow by photo services

Senate GOP uses Trump's executive privilege threat as rallying cry against subpoenas

  Senate GOP uses Trump's executive privilege threat as rallying cry against subpoenas A growing number of Republicans are pointing to President Donald Trump's threat to invoke executive privilege in order to make their case against subpoenas sought by Democrats for key witnesses and documents, a development that could bolster Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's goal of a swift end to the impeachment trial. © BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images US President Donald Trump(R) speaks to the press alongside Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell as he arrives on Capitol Hill on March 26, 2019 before joining Senate Republicans for lunch in Washington,DC.

Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski , a key swing vote on the nomination for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, suggested Tuesday that Deborah Ramirez, whose accusations of inappropriate sexual behavior against Kavanaugh were reported by The New Yorker, should talk to Congress.

Murkowski Wants to Hear Case Before Deciding on Impeachment Witnesses . Alaska U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski said she's comfortable waiting to decide if more information is needed as part of the Se . . .

Trump was impeached by the House on charges he abused his power by pushing Ukraine to investigate his Democratic political rival Joe Biden and that he obstructed Congress by blocking witnesses and testimony in the House investigation. Trump has said he did nothing wrong.

Murkowski said a recent Government Accountability Office report that concluded the White House violated federal law by withholding congressionally approved security aid to Ukraine reminded her of last year's debate over Trump's declaration of a border emergency that he invoked to spend more for border barriers than Congress had approved.

During that debate, she said she maintained the president could not take funds congressionally directed to one area and use them to advance his own policies. “Whether it was for the wall or for any other thing, I have been one that has said, ‘Congress has a very specific role when it comes to appropriation of funding and that needs to be respected,’” she said.

She said she viewed the GAO report with a “little bit of concern,” in part because of the need to respect Congress' appropriation powers.

In a telephone interview Friday with the Anchorage Daily News, Alaska's other Republican U.S. senator, Dan Sullivan, said he supports using the same rules as the impeachment of President Bill Clinton in the 1990s, which Sullivan said would give Trump a “fair and balanced” process. Under those rules, he said, the determination of whether or not to bring witnesses would happen in the second phase.

“I think this is going to be a stark contrast to what happened over in the House where you literally witnessed the most rushed most partisan and unprepared impeachment proceedings in the House in U.S. history," Sullivan said.

Romney, Collins say Bolton claims strengthen case for witnesses in impeachment trial .
Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, said Monday it is more likely other Republicans will vote to hear witness testimony from former National Security Adviser John Bolton as part of impeachment proceedings following reports on new allegations in his forthcoming book -- as Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, also said the reports strengthened "the case for witnesses."

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