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Politics Lessons from the Clinton impeachment: Former House managers recall their experiences

23:55  22 january  2020
23:55  22 january  2020 Source:   abcnews.go.com

Pelosi says House to vote Wednesday to send Trump impeachment articles to Senate

  Pelosi says House to vote Wednesday to send Trump impeachment articles to Senate The move will set the stage for the trial of the president on abuse of power and obstruction of Congress to begin next week.Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Tuesday that the House will vote Wednesday to send the two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump to the Senate, three sources in a Democratic caucus meeting told NBC News on Tuesday.

The House impeachment managers on their way to the Senate chamber on Thursday.Credit T.J Still another, a corporate lawyer. Together, seven House Democrats will serve as managers of the Chosen by Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the seven House impeachment managers vary in age and

“We are going to give the House managers full opportunity to present their case; we are going to give the During the Clinton impeachment trial Trent Lott and Tom Daschle, the Republican and “Our Democratic friends, I think, have failed to learn the lesson that if you call everything outrageous “Mitch McConnell said from the very beginning that he was going to use the Clinton process as the

Just 20 lawmakers have argued for a president's impeachment on the Senate floor -- seven during the trial of President Andrew Johnson in 1868 and 13 during for the trial of President Bill Clinton in 1999.

a group of people sitting at a table: The Senate votes on articles of impeachment and acquits President Clinton in Washington, Feb. 12, 1999.© Getty Images, FILE The Senate votes on articles of impeachment and acquits President Clinton in Washington, Feb. 12, 1999.

ABC News interviewed some former House Republicans who served as managers in the Clinton impeachment trial and they vividly recalled the experience.

"I don't recall working any more intensely when I was a congressman to get it right," former Rep. Bill McCollum, R-Fla., told ABC News.

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  Mic fight? Nadler appears to rush ahead of Schiff to offer closing remarks "Jerry, Jerry, Jerry," Schiff, the lead impeachment manager, can be heard calling after him.The moment came after Chief Justice John Roberts read the final question from Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., which asked House managers to give senators any additional thoughts before the trial adjourned for the evening.

Bill McCollum, a House manager in the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton , recalls House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has chosen seven members of Congress to serve as House managers in the impeachment trial for President Donald Trump, emphasizing their experience with the legal system.

Henry Hyde, R-Ill., reads the articles of impeachment against President Bill Clinton to the Senate as the other House managers who will conduct the The trial was a messy exercise in American democracy -- a prosecution born of a president’s scandalous attempt to extricate himself from the

Here are a few lessons they shared from that experience:

Body language and eye contact

McCollum said he memorized his remarks and focused on his presentation and demeanor in front of the Senate.

"When I gave it, I wasn't reading it, it was there in front of me as a prop," he said. "I was making eye contact with senators. Body language conveys a lot."

Jon Dudas, Bill McCollum, Jim Sensenbrenner sitting at a table: Bill McCollum, R-Fla., delivers his opening statement as the House Judiciary Committee meets to debate merits of a presidential impeachment inquiry in Washington, Oct. 5, 1998.© CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images, FILE Bill McCollum, R-Fla., delivers his opening statement as the House Judiciary Committee meets to debate merits of a presidential impeachment inquiry in Washington, Oct. 5, 1998.

"You've got to be focused, disciplined, not distracted by other things," McCollum added.

Several of the current House impeachment managers -- and members of President Donald Trump's defense team -- appeared to approach their remarks on the floor the same way Tuesday.

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Among the twelve impeachment managers –the members tasked with taking the impeachment articles to the Senate and arguing for the We think that the Clinton acquittal crushed Republicans because cable news, the printed press, and emerging online commentary overwhelmingly played it

William Jefferson Clinton was impeached on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice today by a Still, it was Mr. Livingston today who called for Mr. Clinton 's resignation from the House floor. With a sex scandal now consuming one of their own, the House 's impeachment debate turned more

MORE: Rulebreakers and notetakers: Behind the scenes so far in the Senate impeachment trial

Reps. Adam Schiff. D-Calif., and Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., barely glanced down at their notes and appeared to speak extemporaneously, off-the-cuff.

Jay Sekulow, Trump's personal attorney who is leading the defense team with White House counsel Pat Cipollone, did the same in his more limited time speaking Tuesday. He also appeared to focus on making eye contact with the senators sitting in the chamber.

Fielding questions will be most difficult part of trial

In 1999, the biggest challenge for former Rep. Chris Cannon, R-Utah, was "putting together a coherent case in a situation where the chief justice is reading questions from witnesses."

The Trump impeachment trial is expected to move to questions early next week, depending on how much time is spent on opening arguments.

MORE: Chief Justice John Roberts scolds both sides at Senate impeachment trial

They could break it up to different players, but it's really hard to prepare for that other than divide up issues among yourself," he said. "Those guys are going to have to speak on the spot."

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Listen to ‘The Daily’: Lessons From the Last Impeachment Trial. — that independent counsel Kenneth Starr is investigating whether the president asked a former White House One of President Clinton ’s top aides told him during the impeachment process. And as the Republicans — as the House managers who are prosecuting this case — start to make their case, what are the points that

President Bill Clinton survived impeachment after casting himself as the target of partisan motives. I was kind of surprised by the tone because President Clinton both by design and by DNA is an incredibly charming fellow and, as I recall , the speech degraded from the charm factor rather quickly

Don't get distracted or starstruck

Former Rep. James Rogan, R-Calif., who lost his seat to Schiff in 2000 and now serves as a judge on the California Superior Court, said he felt the weight of history when he walked through the Senate chamber with the other managers ahead of the trial in 1999.

a man wearing a suit and tie: Rep. and impeachment manager James Rogan, R-Ca., briefs reporters after taking a short break during the 6th day of Senate impeachment trial proceedings against President Bill Clinton in Washington, Jan. 21, 1999.© AFP via Getty Images, FILE Rep. and impeachment manager James Rogan, R-Ca., briefs reporters after taking a short break during the 6th day of Senate impeachment trial proceedings against President Bill Clinton in Washington, Jan. 21, 1999.

"I was standing on the floor, looking at the big robotic camera on the wall, and thought to myself, 'Let me see, I'm going to try a case, the president is my defendant, the chief justice is the trial judge, I'll be live on television worldwide, the Senate is the jury," he told ABC News. "If I say anything remotely stupid, my great grandkids get to watch it on the History Channel. No pressure!'"

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He recalled nearly losing his composure during the arguments when he looked up from the dais and saw the Supreme Court justices and Whoopi Goldberg, who is a co-host on ABC's "The View," watching from the gallery.

Sen. Ted Kennedy, D-Mass., was staring him down intently from his desk and he said it brought him back to his childhood in San Francisco when he cut class with a few friends to wait outside ABC affiliate KGO to catch a glimpse of the young senator and potential presidential candidate. Kennedy took a photo with Rogan and his friends.

"I looked up and had a flashback to him getting out of the car and remembered how thrilled and speechless I was," he said. "And then I remember thinking -- get back to business!"

Dershowitz changes his mind on impeachment requirements, argues crime must be committed .
As President Trump’s impeachment trial moves into the defense phases, Alan Dershowitz on Sunday said that he has changed his mind on whether a crime is needed to remove a president from office in a reversal of his stance during the impeachment of President Bill Clinton in 1999. © Provided by FOX NewsDershowitz, who recently joined Trump’s impeachment defense team, argued that a crime needs to be committed to impeach a president – a 180-degree shift from his previous thinking – and added that even after lengthy arguments by the House managers last week, he still sees Democrats' arguments falling far short of swaying the Senate to remove Trump

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