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Politics Trump’s new budget proposal expected to show how far he has moved away from some 2016 campaign promises

15:15  09 february  2020
15:15  09 february  2020 Source:   washingtonpost.com

GOP chairman says he won't hold hearing on Trump's budget: 'It turns into a diatribe'

  GOP chairman says he won't hold hearing on Trump's budget: 'It turns into a diatribe' Senate Budget Committee Chairman Mike Enzi (R-Wyo.) said he will not hold a hearing on President Trump's proposed fiscal 2021 budget because it would only spark "animosity" between Democrats and administration officials. © Greg Nash GOP chairman says he won't hold hearing on Trump's budget: 'It turns into a diatribe' Trump unveiled his $4.8 trillion budget proposal on Monday. The hefty document, which was immediately panned by Democrats, breaks with an existing two-year budget deal and outlines the president's priorities heading into the November election.

The budget proposal President Trump will release Monday is expected to lay bare how much he has adjusted to the political and practical limits of Washington, with some of his biggest campaign promises from 2016 cast aside and replaced with more limited policy ambitions.

“The budget proposal President Trump will release Monday is expected to lay bare how much he has adjusted to the political and practical “On immigration, health care, infrastructure and the deficit, the final budget pitch of Trump ’ s first term will look much different from the campaign platform he

The budget proposal President Trump will release Monday is expected to lay bare how much he has adjusted to the political and practical limits of Washington, with some of his biggest campaign promises from 2016 cast aside and replaced with more limited policy ambitions.

a lit up city at night: The White House at dusk. (Smartphone photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post)© Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post The White House at dusk. (Smartphone photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post)

On immigration, health care, infrastructure and the deficit, the final budget pitch of Trump’s first term will look much different from the campaign platform he offered four years ago.

The border wall that he promised would be paid for by Mexico is instead being financed by billions in U.S. taxpayer dollars, and the administration’s budget request to Congress is expected to seek even more.

Trump’s budget to spurn cuts to Ukraine aid, in a break from the past

  Trump’s budget to spurn cuts to Ukraine aid, in a break from the past Slashing funds could have drawn unwelcome attention at a highly charged moment for the administration. At the heart of the trial is Trump’s decision to freeze hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to Ukraine over the summer — a move that the Government Accountability Office recently said violated federal budget law — and how that move played into a broader effort to pressure the country into launching his desired political investigations.Trump plans to ask for $250 million in Pentagon funding assistance, in addition to more than $100 million in aid through the State Department.

As President Donald Trump runs for re-election on a slogan of “ promises made, promises kept” he will have one major obstacle while convincing voters: his According to a new Washington Post analysis, this dynamic will be compounded by the budget Trump is expected to release on Monday.

As Mr. Trump has repeatedly shown , he can show a measure of discipline in one moment — like his On Thursday, Mr. Trump tweeted that he was looking to move away from a proposal pushed by And officials are expected to hold events in the Midwest highlighting provisions aimed at helping

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The president’s 2015 promise to protect Medicaid from cuts has been repeatedly ignored, as he has sought to slash some $800 billion over a decade from the health program for low-income Americans. The latest evidence of this came on Saturday, when he wrote on Twitter that the budget proposal “will not be touching your Social Security or Medicare.” He made no mention of protecting Medicaid, even though he had vowed to guard it during his first presidential campaign.

He is also seeking to gut the Affordable Care Act through the courts despite pledging to safeguard one of its key tenets: insurance coverage for people with preexisting conditions.

Democrats pan Trump's budget proposal as 'dead on arrival'

  Democrats pan Trump's budget proposal as 'dead on arrival' Democrats quickly panned President Trump's fiscal year 2021 budget proposal on Monday, pledging that it is "dead on arrival" on Capitol Hill. The $4.8 trillion plan includes cuts that would break with a two-year budget deal agreed to by both the White House and congressional leadership.Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) called Trump's proposal a "double-cross" of the Americans Trump promised to help during last week's State of theThe $4.8 trillion plan includes cuts that would break with a two-year budget deal agreed to by both the White House and congressional leadership.

" He certainly has tried to do what he said he was going to do," said Peter Van Doren, senior fellow at the libertarian Cato Institute. Trump promised to weed out corruption in Washington by establishing new limits on lobbying by former administration officials.

President Donald Trump delivered his State of the Union address on Tuesday night. My Budget also contains an exciting vision for our Nation’ s high schools. We have launched ambitious new initiatives to substantially improve care for Americans with kidney disease, Alzheimer’ s , and those struggling

During the 2016 campaign, Trump vowed to deliver a major infrastructure plan, but there has been virtually no progress on this issue.

And the president’s promise to eliminate the government’s roughly $20 trillion debt within eight years has also gone unfulfilled. Instead, Trump has added almost $3 trillion to the debt in three years, and that number is only expected to balloon, according to nonpartisan estimates. Proposals to cut domestic programs have evaporated in massive year-end budget deals with Congress that have actually raised spending limits.

Trump’s first budget proposal relied on questionable math when it sought to eliminate the budget deficit after 10 years, but even that goal has slipped out of reach.

Trump has scored a string of victories in recent months, including securing a bipartisan revamp of the North American Free Trade Agreement and being acquitted by Republicans in the Senate on impeachment charges. He signed a partial trade deal with China and marshaled through a massive tax-cut package in 2017.

Doyle McManus: Trump once vowed to wipe out the federal deficit. Now he's just pretending

  Doyle McManus: Trump once vowed to wipe out the federal deficit. Now he's just pretending WASHINGTON - "Promises made, promises kept" has been one of President Trump's frequent boasts in his campaign for a second term. So it was a little awkward this week when his own proposed budget acknowledged, in the fine print, that several of his key promises haven't been kept at all. When Trump ran in 2016, he promised that if Congress enacted big tax cuts for corporations, economic growth would soar to 4% or more. “I actually think we can go higher,” he said.He promised to balance the federal budget in eight years, a longstanding Republican aim that those economic growth rates could make possible.Neither goal is being met — not even close.

Here's how Trump has pledged to "Make America Great Again". Below are some of Trump ' s signature proposals supporters expect him to deliver on when he takes office in January. Without question, Trump ' s central campaign plank was his pledge to build a wall on the US-Mexico border.

In Donald Trump ’ s final days on the campaign trail, he promised his supporters that “every dream you ever dreamed for your country” will come true if he becomes president — one of dozens of sweeping promises he made and is now expected to fulfill.

But Monday’s budget proposal will demonstrate that a number of the president’s loftiest campaign promises from four years ago have largely been abandoned, because of political realities as well as simple budget math.

“I have no idea how he can live up to his campaign promises to reduce the deficit, not address entitlement programs, and at the same time cut taxes,” said Bill Hoagland, a Republican who served as staff director for the Senate Budget Committee. “I have not figured out how to square this circle, and neither have they.”

White House officials declined to comment for this article, but the president has sought to seize on a range of accomplishments as affirmation that his governing style is delivering results for Americans. White House officials have argued that the strong economy is lifting wages for workers across the income distribution, pointing to low unemployment and relatively steady growth.

“We are advancing with unbridled optimism and lifting high our citizens of every race, color, religion and creed,” the president said in his State of the Union address. “The years of economic decay are over.”

Trump budget plan would fail to eliminate deficit over 10 years, briefing document shows

  Trump budget plan would fail to eliminate deficit over 10 years, briefing document shows An overview of the White House's budget, obtained by The Washington Post, calls for eliminating the deficit in 15 years.Instead, White House officials plan to say that their budget proposal would close the deficit by 2035. During Trump’s first year in office, his advisers said their budget plan would eliminate the deficit by around 2028. This new budget will mark the third consecutive time that they abandon that 10-year goal and instead suggest a 15-year target. This new trend shows how little progress the White House is making in dealing with ballooning government debt, something party leaders had made a top goal during the Obama administration.

Trump has said he ' s willing to use interrogation techniques that go even further than Trump is confident he can get this done before taking office. (Last year he incorrectly said this had already 49. Impose new taxes on many imports into the country. Numbers thrown around have included 32

President Trump ' s 2020 budget proposal calls for major reductions in spending on Medicare and Medicaid. Trump promised not to cut the programs as a candidate in 2016 , and his potential 2020 rivals are already using the budget plan against him . The White House has denied that Trump wants

As a presidential candidate in 2016, Trump pledged time and again that Mexico would pay for his border wall.

It was a promise he’s also sporadically made as president, at times suggesting that the renegotiated North American trade deal would somehow finance the barrier’s construction, though without explaining how. The Mexican government has rejected the notion of playing any role in paying for the wall and Trump’s budgets have not proposed pulling the money from Mexico. Instead, U.S. taxpayers are spending upward of $20 billion for the border wall, between money appropriated by Congress and funds Trump has taken from the Pentagon budget by declaring a national emergency at the border.

That trend is expected to continue in the budget due out Monday.

On infrastructure, Trump has repeatedly made promises of a $1 trillion infrastructure plan, but his last budget proposed only a $200 billion federal investment toward that goal while cutting infrastructure spending in other areas. He has flirted with making an infrastructure deal with Democrats, only to have those efforts fizzle. The notion of a White House “Infrastructure Week” has become a standing joke on Capitol Hill. And despite a renewed promise in the State of the Union address, and a new round of talks involving Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, congressional Democrats have little hope that an infrastructure deal will actually materialize.

Exclusive: Trump proposes 21% cut in U.S. foreign aid in budget proposal - officials

  Exclusive: Trump proposes 21% cut in U.S. foreign aid in budget proposal - officials President Donald Trump will propose cutting billions of dollars in U.S. foreign aid in his fiscal 2021 budget while seeking an increase in funds to counter developing economic threats from China and Russia, senior administration officials told Reuters. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Trump, a Republican, sought in his budget proposal last year to slash foreign aid but faced steep resistance from Congress and did not prevail.

Trump is pressed if he has definitively ruled out prosecuting Hillary Clinton. “It’ s just not something that I feel This is also a stark departure from his campaign rhetoric, when Mr. Trump expressed support for waterboarding and These are the NFL superstars who are expected to earn the most in 2020.

— Donald J. Trump vowed on Tuesday to rip up international trade deals and start an unrelenting offensive against Chinese economic practices, framing his contest with Hillary Clinton as a choice between hard-edge nationalism and the policies of “a leadership class that worships globalism.”

“I hope this budget’s different, and in particular, I would hope that it is different in the infrastructure area where the president’s talked such a good game,” said Rep. David E. Price (D-N.C.), a senior member of the House Appropriations Committee. “But so far, we’ve seen very little.”

Presidential budgets are an annual tradition that spell out the White House’s vision for the government. Congress often casts many of the ideas aside, but the documents are supposed to serve as the opening offer for budget negotiations later in the year. But even more so than under prior administrations, Trump’s budget proposals have been largely rejected by lawmakers who’ve agreed on a bipartisan basis to restore and even increase spending for agencies and programs that the administration has tried to cut, including health and education programs and foreign aid.

Trump in the past few years has sought to backpedal on some of the proposed budget cuts, facing blowback after seeking to cut funding in states central to his reelection campaign, such as Michigan.

That has led to some dejection among career officials at agencies and within the White House Office of Management and Budget, who are forced to devote enormous time and attention to developing a budget document they know Congress will largely reject, according to several people with knowledge of internal administration dynamics who spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe them.

In prior years, Trump’s budgets have reflected the irreconcilable contradictions of his campaign promises in part by relying on overly rosy economic forecasts and glossing over how he would achieve big cuts.

Trump to Propose $4.8 Trillion Budget With Big Safety-Net Cuts

  Trump to Propose $4.8 Trillion Budget With Big Safety-Net Cuts President Trump is expected to release a $4.8 trillion budget Monday that charts a path for the start of a potential second term, proposing steep cuts to social-safety-net programs and foreign aid and higher outlays for defense and veterans. The plan would increase military spending 0.3%, to $740.5 billion for fiscal year 2021, which begins Oct. 1, according to a senior administration official. The proposal would cut nondefense spending by 5%, to $590 billion, below the level Congress and the president agreed to in a two-year budget deal last summer.

Trump ’ s budget proposal has a clear trade-off: The White House wants to gut the nation’s social safety The White House will point out that the economy has exceeded outside forecasts so far . “The Trump budget is breathtaking in its degree of cruelty and filled with broken promises ,” Sen.

Though Mr. Trump would often brag that he was financing his own campaign , that was only partially true. The new disclosures show that nearly 80 percent of the money his campaign brought in came from donors. The disclosures also undercut another theme that was central to Mr. Trump ’ s appeal as

In 2017, Trump’s budget predicted that economic growth would surge to an annual rate of 3 percent by 2021 and stay at that healthy rate indefinitely. This goal has proved elusive. The economy grew 2.9 percent in 2018 but slowed to 2.3 percent in 2019, and is projected to slow even more this year. Relying on rosy economic estimates in the budget plans allows the White House to assume that prospering families and companies will generate high levels of tax revenue as a way to offset the widening deficit. Instead, the deficit estimates have proved faulty.

Trump’s budgets have also proposed enormous cuts to domestic spending programs as a way to try to bring the deficit down. But nondefense domestic spending, aside from what are considered mandatory programs, makes up just a sliver of the overall $4.6 trillion federal budget. Mandatory programs, including the domestic programs Medicare and Social Security, make up more than 60 percent of federal spending. And since Trump has promised repeatedly to wall off Medicare and Social Security from cuts, while also increasing the Pentagon and Department of Homeland Security budgets, he has fewer agencies available for cuts if he wants to seek reductions.

Rep. Charles J. “Chuck” Fleischmann (R-Tenn.), a member of the Appropriations Committee, said the deficit cannot be addressed until Congress and the administration take on entitlement programs such as Medicare and Social Security. But he noted that Trump has promised to protect those programs, “and I will certainly respect that.”

“So I think right now, this year, is probably not the year to deal with the mandatory side of the equation,” Fleischmann said. “But perhaps that’s something that President Trump will look at with the Congress in his second term.”

The president and his aides have also said the GOP tax cut of 2017 would pay for itself, meaning that it would create so much new tax revenue because of growth that there will not be an impact on the deficit. This prediction has not come true, critics say. The Congressional Budget Office recently said that annual deficits will top $1 trillion in 2020 for the first time since 2012 and that the tax cuts have led to a reduction in new revenue.

Smaller promises have also proved unworkable. As a presidential candidate, Trump repeatedly promised to save the federal government $300 billion a year by allowing the United States to negotiate lower prescription drug prices, saying “on Day One we solve” that issue. Trump later backed off his promise to have Medicare negotiate for lower drug prices, although nonpartisan experts had dismissed the claim that $300 billion could be saved annually.

And the impeachment drama has also forced the administration to shift course. Past attempts to cut a State Department foreign aid program for Ukraine that was at the center of the impeachment inquiry are being abandoned this year, although the administration is likely to pursue cuts to other State Department programs, in line with the president’s well-known distaste for foreign aid.

Although Trump has talked publicly about wanting to cut spending, he has also signaled an indifference toward the federal budget. During the Obama administration, the White House budget proposal was typically released at a high-profile news conference featuring members of the Cabinet and top aides. Trump administration officials have done less to market and tout their budget document. Trump rarely speaks of it.

Leaked audio from a dinner the president attended in January with donors at Mar-a-Lago, his private resort in Florida, captured the president brushing aside those who are critical of rising defense and federal spending as part of the growing national debt. “Who the hell cares about the budget? We’re going to have a country,” the president said.

Trump Deficit Forecast Is Built on Shaky Assumptions, Experts Say .
The Trump administration’s proposed budget projects federal deficits would be cut in half as a share of the economy by 2024, and in half again by 2029. Budget experts say the projections are built on questionable assumptions. The $4.8 trillion budget for fiscal 2021, released Monday, assumes that economic growth will be stronger than most forecasters project. To hit its targets, the budget excludes tax cuts the administration may propose later and includes spending cuts that are vague, unlikely to advance in Congress, or both.

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