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Politics Susan Collins says her vote to acquit Trump wasn't about predicting his behavior after saying he 'learned' from impeachment

23:00  12 february  2020
23:00  12 february  2020 Source:   cnn.com

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Washington — Republican Senator Susan Collins announced Tuesday she will vote to acquit President Trump in his Senate trial, telling CBS News she believes the president has learned a "pretty big lesson" from impeachment and will be "much more cautious" about seeking foreign assistance in

WASHINGTON — Senator Susan Collins , Republican of Maine, said on Tuesday that she would vote to acquit President Trump of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, calling his conduct “wrong” but saying she could not support removing him from office. “I do not believe that the House has met

Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, who voted to acquit President Donald Trump at his impeachment trial, said Wednesday that her acquittal vote was "not based on predicting (Trump's) future behavior," following previous comments she made saying Trump had "learned from this case."

Susan Collins et al. looking at a cell phone: Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and John Barrasso (R-WY) walk from the Senate subway to the Senate chamber to cast a vote in the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump U.S. Capitol on February 5, 2020 in Washington.© Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and John Barrasso (R-WY) walk from the Senate subway to the Senate chamber to cast a vote in the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump U.S. Capitol on February 5, 2020 in Washington.

When asked by CNN on Wednesday what Trump had learned from the impeachment process, Collins would not directly answer the question, instead defending her position and saying that her vote was "solely" based on whether the House managers reached the high bar for removing a sitting president, she said.

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  Opinions | Susan Collins’s impeachment vote personifies her soulless party Cowardice and incoherence are the Republicans' identifying characteristics.One could hardly be surprised that self-identified pro-choice Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine — who talked herself into supporting the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh on the grounds that the conservative jurist, picked off a list approved by right-to-lifers, would uphold Roe v. Wade (!) — would concoct some rationalization for voting to acquit President Trump in his impeachment trial.

Republican Senator Susan Collins said she believes President Trump has learned a "pretty big lesson" by being impeached and plans to vote to acquit him . Collins was one of only two Republicans who voted to allow witnesses in the impeachment trial. But even without witnesses

Susan Collins , who announced her vote to acquit on Tuesday, was only fractionally sillier, if less sad. She seized upon the claim that impeachment requires a crime-ish act, said that censure was a better option, and faulted the House for failing to subpoena John Bolton, after his attorney announced

"My vote to acquit the President was not based on predicting his future behavior. It was based solely on the issue, whether or not the house managers reached the high bar for removing a duly elected president," Collins said. "And in my judgment, they did not."

"That was the basis for my vote," she said, accusing the media of misrepresenting her position without specifying what she meant by that criticism.

Collins continued, "So I don't understand why you keep linking how I voted to whether or not the President's learned to be more careful, in conversations with foreign leaders, which is what I was talking about."

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Susan Collins announced Tuesday that she will vote to acquit President Trump of impeachment charges, a decision that In a speech from the Senate floor, Collins attributed her acquittal votes to weaknesses in the case to remove Trump presented by the Democratic-controlled House — a case

Susan Collins said Tuesday that she will vote to acquit President Donald Trump during the final phase of his impeachment trial. On Tuesday, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., said she anticipates the Republican Senate will vote to acquit Trump and said she would vote in favor of censuring him .

Collins is referring to media coverage of and reaction to her comments in an interview with CBS' Norah O'Donnell, where she defended her vote to acquit Trump on both articles of impeachment.

"I believe that the President has learned from this case," Collins told O'Donnell in the interview earlier this month ahead of the February 5 vote in Trump's Senate impeachment trial..

She continued, "The President has been impeached. That's a pretty big lesson. I'm voting to acquit. Because I do not believe that the behavior alleged reaches the high bar in the Constitution for overturning an election, and removing a duly elected president."

When O'Donnell asked Collins what she thinks Trump learned, Collins responded, "He was impeached. And there has been criticism by both Republican and Democratic senators of his call. I believe that he will be much more cautious in the future."

The Republican-controlled senate voted to acquit the President in a trial that concluded last week. However, Collins, who is up for reelection in a purple state, has continued to face questions over her vote. Collins was also one of only two GOP senators to vote in favor of allowing witnesses and additional documents in the trial.

Democrat won’t rule out new Trump impeachment over Roger Stone case .
Rep. Eric Swalwell would not rule out a new impeachment effort over the president's alleged interference in the criminal case of his former associate.Federal prosecutors on Monday had recommended a sentence of between 87 and 108 months in prison for Stone’s conviction on seven counts of obstruction, witness tampering and making false statements to Congress on charges that stemmed from former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation.

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