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Politics Four Lawmakers Vote Against Bill to Outlaw Lynching, Cite Gov Overreach

00:30  27 february  2020
00:30  27 february  2020 Source:   newsweek.com

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If signed into law , the Justice for Victims of Lynching Act would outline the specific killing of lynching , noting its violent and racist legacy, and add it to the federal list of hate crimes. As Booker's office noted Thursday, the vote followed more than a century of efforts to outlaw lynching that have failed to pass.

The House is slated to vote this week on legislation that would classify lynching as a federal hate crime, paving the way for the bill to head to President Trump’s desk.

Historic legislation that would make lynching a federal hate crime passed the House by near-unanimous consent Wednesday—with four representatives opposing it.

Louie Gohmert sitting at a table: Republican Representative Louie Gohmert listens during the House Judiciary Committee's markup of House Resolution 755, Articles of Impeachment Against President Donald Trump, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on December 12, 2019. © Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Republican Representative Louie Gohmert listens during the House Judiciary Committee's markup of House Resolution 755, Articles of Impeachment Against President Donald Trump, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on December 12, 2019.

Three Republicans voted against the measure: GOP members Ted Yoho of Florida, Louie Gohmert of Texas and Thomas Massie of Virginia. The chamber's lone Independent, Justin Amash of Michigan—who famously switched from Republican to Independent over his support for impeaching President Donald Trump—also voted no.

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Tim Scott proposed a bill to outlaw lynching that passed in the Senate on Dec. The Senate approved a bill on Wednesday that would make lynching a federal crime after more than a century of such attempts to outlaw the act. Harris touted the vote on Twitter, calling the moment “history.”

The Senate approved a bill on Wednesday that would make lynching a federal crime after more than a century of such attempts to outlaw the act.

Sixteen members did not vote. The proposal, however, received broad bipartisan support and passed 410-4.

Republicans accused the legislation of being an overreach by the federal government and encroaching on states' rights.

In a statement to Newsweek, Massie said he disagreed with part of the bill that would add lynching to the list of current criminal civil rights violations.

"The Constitution specifies only a handful of federal crimes and leaves the rest to individual states to prosecute," he said. "In addition, this bill expands current federal 'hate crime' laws. A crime is a crime, and all victims deserve equal justice. Adding enhanced penalties for 'hate' tends to endanger other liberties, such as freedom of speech."

House to take historic vote to make lynching a federal crime

  House to take historic vote to make lynching a federal crime Lawmakers will take a historic vote on Wednesday when the House of Representatives takes up legislation to make lynching a federal crime. © Andrew Harnik/AP Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., right, questions Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg as he testifies before a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, April 11, 2018. The House will vote on HR 35, anti-lynching legislation introduced by Democratic Rep. Bobby Rush of Illinois, called the Emmett Till Antilynching Act.

The parliamentarian even ruled against the bill ’s name, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, since the provision creating the name The House passed the Republican tax plan on Tuesday. However, lawmakers will have to vote again on Wednesday after the Senate parliamentarian rejected three provisions in the

The passage of anti - lynching legislation became one of the NAACP’s central goals. Dyer’s bill , which provided the blueprint for all subsequent NAACP-backed anti - lynching measures, sought to charge lynch mobs with capital murder and to try lynching cases in federal court.

The offices of Yoho, Gohmert and Amash did not immediately respond to request for comment.

Yoho, speaking to CNN's Manu Raju, said the bill would trample on states' rights and was "an overreach of the federal government."

Previous attempts by Congress since 1900 to pass similar legislation repeatedly failed. But the bill will head to the president's desk for approval. The Senate approved it by unanimous consent in February 2019. If it becomes law, which it's expected to, violators would face substantial fines and/or jail time.

Between 1877 and 1950, the Equal Justice Initiative estimates that more than 4,000 black people were lynched in a dozen states: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.

The bill, the Emmett Till Antilynching Act, was written after the 1955 racist murder of a black teenager in Mississippi, which spawned civil rights action.

"This legislation will not erase the stain of lynching and racist violence, but it will help shine the light of truth on the injustices of the past so that we can heal our nation and build a better, safer future for all of our children," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said on the floor.

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