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Politics Trump’s Response to Protests Draws Bipartisan Rebuke in Congress

07:05  03 june  2020
07:05  03 june  2020 Source:   nytimes.com

Trump slams governors as 'weak,' urges crackdown on protests

  Trump slams governors as 'weak,' urges crackdown on protests President Donald Trump on Monday derided the nation’s governors as “weak” and demanded tougher crackdowns on protesters in the aftermath of another night of violent protests in dozens of American cities. © ASSOCIATED PRESS President Donald Trump speaks to the media as boards Air Force One, Saturday, May 30, 2020, at Andrews Air Force Base, Md. Trump is en route to Kennedy Space Center for the SpaceX Falcon 9 Launch.

“We would hope that the president of the United States would follow the lead of so many other presidents and be a healer in chief,” Speaker Nancy Pelosi said, “and not a fanner of the flame.”. Credit Al Drago for The New York Times.

Zuckerberg faces employee backlash over Trump protest comments. The president made the remarks in response to news about protests that have erupted following the death of George Floyd, a black man in Minnesota who died after a white police officer pinned his neck down with his knee.

Nancy Pelosi standing in a room: “We would hope that the president of the United States would follow the lead of so many other presidents and be a healer in chief,” Speaker Nancy Pelosi said, “and not a fanner of the flame.” © Al Drago for The New York Times “We would hope that the president of the United States would follow the lead of so many other presidents and be a healer in chief,” Speaker Nancy Pelosi said, “and not a fanner of the flame.”

Correction: June 2, 2020

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction: An earlier version of this article misidentified the Republican who objected to a Democratic proposal to condemn President Trump. It was Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, not Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina. 

WASHINGTON — Democratic leaders in Congress and a pair of Republicans on Tuesday condemned President Trump for his response to protests around the country and in the capital, the day after peaceful demonstrators were gassed in front of the White House so he could pose for a photograph with a Bible.

Trump shares letter that calls peaceful protesters 'terrorists'

  Trump shares letter that calls peaceful protesters 'terrorists' President Donald Trump on Thursday shared a letter on Twitter that referred to the peaceful protesters who were forcibly dispersed from a park near the White House on Monday evening as "terrorists."President Donald Trump on Thursday shared a letter on Twitter that referred to the peaceful protesters who were forcibly dispersed from a park near the White House on Monday evening as "terrorists.

House Republicans broke from President Trump en masse for a second time this month to condemn his The measure drew broad support from Republicans, including the party’ s leaders, underscoring how It was, at the time, the most significant bipartisan repudiation of Mr. Trump since he took office.

Acosta: Trump punted on addressing Minneapolis protests . Trump denies knowing racist origin of phrase he tweeted. It may not be a coincidence that Trump ' s rebuke took place after Tucker Carlson, one of the President's favorite Fox hosts, laid into Fauci on Tuesday night -- following earlier

The rare bipartisan rebukes reflected a broad sense of alarm at the president’s behavior as protests of police violence and racial discrimination reach a boiling point throughout the country. They followed a remarkable spectacle that unfolded Monday evening, when the police fired flash-bang explosions and tear gas and used officers on horseback to drive away peaceful protesters as Mr. Trump appeared in the Rose Garden and threatened to send the United States military into states where governors could not bring protests under control.

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He then left the White House and, with Attorney General William P. Barr and other aides, crossed a park that had been cleared of demonstrators to have his picture taken holding the Bible outside a historic church that had been vandalized in the unrest.

Twitter disables Trump video tribute to Floyd over copyright complaint

  Twitter disables Trump video tribute to Floyd over copyright complaint Twitter disables Trump video tribute to Floyd over copyright complaintThe clip, which is a collation of photos and videos of protest marches and instances of violence in the aftermath of Floyd's death, has Trump speaking in the background.

Jacquelyn Martin/AP Photo. Trump ' s military parade draws bipartisan rebuke . A pair of Democratic military veterans in Congress — Reps. Ruben Gallego of Arizona and Ted Lieu of California — wrote Defense Secretary James Mattis in a letter Wednesday that just "because authoritarian regimes like

Democrats in Congress are demanding answers about Donald Trump ' s walk to St John's Church after law enforcement dispersed peaceful protesters near He called governors "weak" for their response to widespread pockets of violence, looting, and vandalism that have marked many of the protests

“After the president’s reality show ended last night, while the nation nervously watched the chaos that engulfs us, President Trump probably laid in bed pleased with himself for descending another rung on the dictatorial ladder,” Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the Democratic leader, said on the Senate floor on Tuesday morning. “He probably wore out his remote control watching the clips of General Barr’s victory over the unarmed in the battle of Lafayette Square.”

He added: “It’s all so sad, so pathetic, so weak.”

On the other side of the Capitol, wielding her own Bible and quoting from the Book of Ecclesiastes, Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged the president to focus on “a time to heal,” adding that the aggressive scene that played out in Washington on Monday had “no place” in the nation’s capital.

Slideshow by photo services

“We would hope that the president of the United States would follow the lead of so many other presidents and be a healer in chief,” Ms. Pelosi said, “and not a fanner of the flame.”

Twitter blocks video of Trump's campaign team for copyright infringement

 Twitter blocks video of Trump's campaign team for copyright infringement © Olivier DOULIERY New Zoff between Twitter and US President Donald Trump: The short message service has blocked a video that Trump's campaign team had published about the protests after the death of African American George Floyd. The reason is a copyright infringement. New Zoff between Twitter and US President Donald Trump: The short message service has blocked a video that Trump's campaign team had published about the protests after the death of African American George Floyd.

U. S . president Donald Trump said he would deploy the military if state officials didn't quell the violence amidst protests after George Floyd' s death.

© VIVEK PRAKASH/AFP/Getty Images Protesters hold a banner and wave US national flags as they march from Chater Garden to the US consulate in Hong Kong on September 8, 2019, to call on the US to pressure Beijing to meet their demands and for Congress to pass a recently proposed bill that

Their comments reflected a building sense of outrage at Mr. Trump among Democrats, who are pressing for quick action to address the excessive use of force and the killings of unarmed black Americans by the police.

But at least two Republicans joined in the criticism of the president’s actions as well.

“There is no right to riot, no right to destroy others’ property and no right to throw rocks at police,” Senator Ben Sasse, Republican of Nebraska, said in a statement. “But there is a fundamental — a constitutional — right to protest, and I’m against clearing out a peaceful protest for a photo op that treats the word of God as a political prop.”

His comments echoed those of Senator Tim Scott of South Carolina, the only black Republican in the Senate, who denounced the move in unequivocal terms during an event hosted by Politico.

“If your question is, ‘Should you use tear gas to clear a path so the president can go have a photo op?’ the answer is no,” Mr. Scott said.

But when Democrats moved to officially condemn Mr. Trump for the move, offering a symbolic resolution that also affirmed the rights of Americans to peacefully assemble and denounced rioters and looters, Republicans blocked the effort.

Esper, Milley won't testify before House panel on military response to protests

  Esper, Milley won't testify before House panel on military response to protests Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Mark Milley have refused to testify before the House Armed Services Committee on the military's role in responding to nationwide protests against police violence and racial injustice, a House aide said Friday. © The Hill Getty Images "Staff was advised that [Department of Defense] leadership has refused to testify next week as requested," the aide said. "In addition, an informal briefing with the secretary of the Army was cancelled for today." The Pentagon did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The proposal came in President Trump ’ s plan to reorganize the federal government. It followed an executive order Trump issued in April, creating a task force to recommend a path Elijah Cummings, D-Md., who cosponsored a bipartisan bill to overhaul USPS that is awaiting a vote on the House floor.

President Donald Trump again drew a parallel between white supremacists and counter protesters on Thursday, drawing a mild rebuke from South Carolina’ s Later Thursday, the president signed a joint resolution passed by Congress denouncing the Charlottesville violence and white supremacy, and

Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, said he objected because the resolution addressed neither justice for black Americans or “peace for our country in the face of looting.”

“Instead, it just indulges in the myopic obsession with President Trump that has come to define the Democratic side,” Mr. McConnell said.

Mr. McConnell then tried to pass his own resolution to condemn a long pattern of unjust police violence against black Americans, praise peaceful protesters, and condemn rioting, but Mr. Schumer objected, calling it insufficient because it failed to denounce Mr. Trump’s actions.

Many other Republicans refrained entirely on Tuesday from addressing Mr. Trump’s words and actions, and some offered support for the president, noting that protests had grown violent and, in some cases, given way to looting.

“We have to restore order,” Senator Ron Johnson, Republican of Wisconsin, told reporters when asked about the president’s calls for military force. “This can’t go on. So hopefully, you know, the president talking that way will put a little spine in some of these governors that aren’t calling out the National Guard, to the extent that they need to to restore order.”

Mr. Johnson said he had not seen video of the police clearing protesters from outside the White House to make way for Mr. Trump.

Colin Powell: Trump has 'drifted away' from the Constitution

  Colin Powell: Trump has 'drifted away' from the Constitution Former Republican Secretary of State Colin Powell said Sunday that President Donald Trump has "drifted away" from the Constitution, adding to a growing list of former top military officials who have strongly criticized the President's response to the nationwide protests surrounding the police killing of George Floyd. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); "We have a Constitution. And we have to follow that Constitution.

Senator John Thune of South Dakota, the second-ranking Republican, said the episode was “in the eye of the beholder.”

He offered a vague critique of Mr. Trump’s idea of inserting the military to rout protesters, saying: “I would prefer that these things be handled by the state and local authorities. You want to de-escalate, rather than escalate.”

Minutes before the scene unfolded on Monday, Mr. Trump had threatened an “overwhelming law enforcement presence until the violence has been quelled.” In the nation’s capital later Monday night, that warning became a reality, as military helicopters flew low over protesters breaking curfew in “show of force displays” and federal law enforcement officials continued to deploy flash grenades.

Representative Adam Smith, Democrat of Washington and the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, called on Tuesday for Secretary of Defense Mark T. Esper and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark A. Milley, to testify before lawmakers about the potential deployments of United States military personnel to states.

“What I want to hear from them is: What role do they envision the United States military playing in dealing with the violence and the protests we are seeing in the cities?” Mr. Smith said.

Mr. Smith referred to comments made by Mr. Esper on a call led by Mr. Trump with the nation’s governors on Monday, in which the defense secretary used military language to describe the response to protests, telling governors, “We need to dominate the battle space.”

Condoleezza Rice urges Trump to "put tweeting aside for a little bit"

  Condoleezza Rice urges Trump to Rice urged Mr. Trump to "speak in the language of unity, the language of empathy.""People look to the Oval Office as we've looked to the Oval Office throughout our history for messages, for signals, and as I said, the president has used some language that I really very much admire, like the 'resilience of the American people,'" Rice said on "Face the Nation" in an interview that aired Sunday. "Just be careful about those messages. I'm not advising the president, but if I were, I would say let's put tweeting aside for a little bit and talk to us, have a conversation with us. And I think we need that, and I think he can do it.

“Language like that is deeply concerning in terms of how the military could be used for domestic law enforcement,” Mr. Smith said.

Even moderate Democrats in conservative-leaning districts emphatically denounced Mr. Trump’s response to the protests in Washington, in a sign that there may be little sympathy for the president’s actions among their constituents. Representative Abigail Spanberger, Democrat of Virginia, a former C.I.A. officer, called his response the type of action “undertaken by authoritarian regimes throughout the world.”

“I know this playbook,” Ms. Spanberger said, citing her national security background, “and I know the president’s actions are betraying the very foundation of the rule of law he purports to support — the U.S. Constitution.”

Representative Steny H. Hoyer, Democrat of Maryland and the majority leader, said on Tuesday that House leaders had asked the Congressional Black Caucus to take the lead on assembling a package of bills that would address police brutality, racial profiling and other misconduct in the coming days. He said the House would return to Washington to vote as soon as a package was ready for its consideration.

“This is a matter of great urgency, and we expect to act as soon as possible,” Mr. Hoyer said, adding that legislation would seek to “change policies so that these incidents that are happening on a regular basis stop occurring.”

“This can’t happen in America,” he said.

Mr. Hoyer said Mr. Trump’s actions Monday night might lead to a censure vote by the House, calling it “certainly an action worthy and appropriate to censure and to criticize,” though he cautioned that members had not yet discussed the idea.

Nicholas Fandos and Emily Cochrane contributed reporting.

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