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Politics Dueling jobs reports, Russia briefing, John Bolton's book: 5 things to know Thursday

14:41  02 july  2020
14:41  02 july  2020 Source:   usatoday.com

Trump and Bolton – this is when I knew it wasn't going to end well

  Trump and Bolton – this is when I knew it wasn't going to end well Bolton and Trump clashed from the beginning – not just over policy, but in style and temperament. Bolton pushed for preemptive military action against Iran, Syria, Venezuela and North Korea. When the president took a different course, Bolton took to the phone. He became the “anonymous source” for reporters, dishing out tales of White House chaos and presidential incompetence.Bolton was so convinced of his superior intelligence that he was condescending to everyone, including the president.

Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi are posing for a picture: Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer of New York and House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi of California. © Alex Brandon, AP Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer of New York and House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi of California.

Dueling jobs reports likely to paint good news-bad news picture

A pair of jobs reports out Thursday is expected to show that the economy is recouping millions of lost jobs even as hundreds of thousands of Americans continue to be laid off amid the coronavirus pandemic. The Labor Department’s employment survey is expected to show that a record 3.1 million jobs were added in June as the unemployment rate fell to 12.3% from 13.3%, according to economists surveyed by Bloomberg. A separate Labor report is projected to reveal that another 1.3 million Americans filed initial claims for unemployment benefits — a rough measure of layoffs. Bottom line: The rebound from the coronavirus-induced recession — the steepest but shortest on record — is likely to be a drawn-out saga.

Bolton says he would consider testifying against Barr

  Bolton says he would consider testifying against Barr Former national security adviser John Bolton said in an interview Tuesday that he would consider testifying against Attorney General William Barr if House Democrats seek his testimony.Bolton expressed some reluctance to cooperate with House Democrats, pointing to how they handled the impeachment inquiry into President Trump's contacts with Ukraine. But the veteran diplomat said he'd consult with his lawyers should he be called."I'll certainlyBolton expressed some reluctance to cooperate with House Democrats, pointing to how they handled the impeachment inquiry into President Trump's contacts with Ukraine. But the veteran diplomat said he'd consult with his lawyers should he be called.

  • Recession fears: Will rolling back reopenings hurt the recovery?
  • Impact may be short-lived: Despite PPP loans, 14% of businesses still anticipate layoffs
  • Think the extra $600 unemployment benefits will last until the end of July? Think again.

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Gang of Eight to get Russia intelligence briefing on Capitol Hill

Intelligence officials, including CIA Director Gina Haspel and NSA Director Gen. Paul Nakasone, will brief the Gang of Eight – Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the top Republicans and Democrats on the two intelligence committees – in a classified meeting on Capitol Hill on Thursday, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany confirmed Wednesday. Lawmakers had pressed the Trump administration for more details after the New York Times reported last week that President Donald Trump was informed months ago that a Russian intelligence unit offered secret cash payments to Taliban-linked militants to kill coalition troops, including Americans. Democrats who were briefed suggested he was bowing to Russian President Vladimir Putin at the risk of U.S. soldiers' lives. Senate Republicans appeared split, with some defending the president. Trump has called the intelligence assessments a "hoax."

From Bolton to Mattis, Trump Faces Aides Turned Adversaries

  From Bolton to Mattis, Trump Faces Aides Turned Adversaries As President Donald Trump’s battle for re-election heats up, he faces an unusual and potent foe: a raft of former top aides and Cabinet members -- including John Kelly, James Mattis, and now, John Bolton -- who have turned against him. © Bloomberg Defense Secretary James Mattis Attends White House Press Briefing It’s normal to have dissent in the ranks, but the list of Trump advisers turned detractors is striking in its size, the seniority of its members and the vehemence of their critiques -- especially for a president known to prize loyalty above all else.

  • 'I don't know what the Russians have on the president': Pelosi slams Trump over reports of bounty on US troops
  • What to know: How Trump gets, or doesn't get, his intelligence briefings
  • Opinion: This July Fourth, deaths of three Marines haunt Trump on Russian bounty to Taliban

John Bolton's controversial book is a No. 1 best-seller

The memoir by John Bolton, President Donald Trump's former national security adviser, sold more than 780,000 copies in its first week and landed the top spot on USA TODAY's Best-Selling books list, out Thursday. Trump's Justice Department went to court to block publication of the book, which portrays the president as incompetent, uninformed, and driven solely by self-interest. In an interview, Bolton called working in the Trump White House "like living inside a pinball machine" and said he probably would have voted for a conviction in Trump's impeachment trial.

Michael Bolton Sings John Bolton ('s Book) for Stephen Colbert (Video)

  Michael Bolton Sings John Bolton ('s Book) for Stephen Colbert (Video) On Tuesday, Stephen Colbert gave people reluctant to read John Bolton's cash-in Trump tell-all "The Room Where It Happened" a very good reason to finally check it out: Having it sung by another famous Bolton, legendary soft rock crooner Michael Bolton. The joke is exactly what it sounds like — a fake trailer for the "exclusive audiobook" of John Bolton's book, "also sung by Bolton… Michael Bolton," the narrator of the clip tells us. Cue up the very real and very excellent voice of Michael, singing along to some of the more well-reported details from the book set to smooth rock music.

  • Bolton interview: Trump White House was 'like living inside a pinball machine'
  • 'Most important priority': Bolton wants to help the GOP keep the Senate, but his explosive book makes him a party outcast
  • The Pence view: VP 'a consistent ally,' often 'stunned' by Trump

States hit rewind on reopening as  new coronavirus infections spike

As new coronavirus infections spike in Utah, Gov. Gary Herbert is requiring the use of masks in all state facilities beginning Thursday. A sudden increase in cases prompted Utah to pause reopening in June. On Wednesday, state health officials reported the most coronavirus cases in one week since the pandemic began. Meanwhile, California Gov. Gavin Newsom said bars must close and indoor operations will need to stop in certain business sectors, effective immediately, in order to mitigate the spread of the coronavirus ahead of Fourth of July weekend.. New Jersey and Delaware have also postponed their reopening plans due Thursday in the face of skyrocketing case counts.

Bolton Book Fight Shows Flaws in U.S. System to Protect Secrets

  Bolton Book Fight Shows Flaws in U.S. System to Protect Secrets The legal fight over John Bolton’s unflattering memoir about his time as national security adviser to President Donald Trump centers on a much-maligned government process for vetting what former U.S. secret-keepers can reveal to the public. © Getty Former government officials say the process for screening their writings to prevent the release of classified information has become increasingly cumbersome over the years, with approvals taking far too long and demands for changes or redactions that seem to reflect political bias more than concern for national security.

  • Where are states on reopening? At least 21 are adapting plans to stop the spread of COVID-19
  • Coronavirus in California: Newsom closes bars, indoor operations for restaurants in 19 counties ahead of Fourth of July weekend
  • What to know about the northeastern states' quarantine: Many travelers to New York, New Jersey and Connecticut will now have to isolate for 14 days

Pack a mask in your carry-on...

Airline carrier Allegiant will require all passengers to wear face coverings on board starting Thursday, according to a statement released last week. Other airlines, including Southwest, American, Alaska Airlines and Delta, have already implemented mandatory face covering rules for passengers and customer-facing employees. American and Delta say that the airlines may deny future travel for customers who decline to wear a facial covering.

  • Spirit Airlines adding summer flights: CEO says it's 'too early to tell' if coronavirus surge grounds travelers again
  • Your next American flight might be full: The airline will no longer block seats in the name of social distancing
  • You can take precautions, too: How to stay safe when flying during the pandemic

Contributing: Associated Press

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Dueling jobs reports, Russia briefing, John Bolton's book: 5 things to know Thursday


Video: Survey: Battleground voters begin to question Trump's handling of economy (CNBC)

'Awards Chatter' Podcast — Hillary Rodham Clinton ('Hillary') .
The polarizing trailblazer who has had a front row seat to — and personally shaped — American history over the last 40 years lets loose about sexism, conspiracy theories and Trump (including how she'd fare against him if she was on the ballot in 2020 and whether he should be locked up).Clinton, of course, is far more accustomed to being centrally involved in trying to solve major problems facing America's, having served as a First Lady (1993-2001), as a United States Senator (2001-2009), as a Secretary of State (2009-2013) and as a candidate for president (2008 and 2016).

usr: 0
This is interesting!