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Politics Environmental headlines you might have missed this week

13:29  03 july  2020
13:29  03 july  2020 Source:   abcnews.go.com

Seawater seeping into decaying oil tanker off Yemen coast

  Seawater seeping into decaying oil tanker off Yemen coast CAIRO (AP) — The United Nations said an abandoned oil tanker moored off the coast of Yemen loaded with more than 1 million barrels of crude oil is at risk of rupture or exploding, causing massive environmental damage to Red Sea marine life, desalination factories and international shipping routes. Meanwhile, Houthi rebels who control the area where the ship is moored have denied U.N. inspectors access to the vessel. Internal documents obtained by The Associated Press shows that seawater has entered the engine compartment of the tanker, which hasn't been maintained for over five years, causing damage to the pipelines and increasing the risk of sinking.

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Here are some you may have missed this week . 20-year-old Nathan Ruser, an Australian student and analyst at the Institute for United Conflict Analytics, made headlines this week when he tweeted about a heatmap showing Strava-user activity.

Every week we'll bring you some of the climate change news and environmental headlines you might have missed this week.

a close up of a blue background: Carbon dioxide levels in 2018 were higher than any other point in recorded history, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. © NASA Carbon dioxide levels in 2018 were higher than any other point in recorded history, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

This is "It's Not Too Late" with ABC Chief Meteorologist Ginger Zee. On ABC News Live and abcnews.com.

© ABC News "It's not too late" climate segment with Ginger Zee

May sets records, July likely to be extra hot

Spring 2020 set records as this May was tied with 2016 for the warmest May on record in 141 years -- 1.71 degrees above average.

15 players test positive for COVID-19 after reporting to training camp

  15 players test positive for COVID-19 after reporting to training camp The NHL has released a statement reporting that 15 players tested positive for COVID-19 after reporting to training camp. More than 1,450 total tests were administered to the 250+ players in camp. These tests have all been administered following the start of Phase 2 of the return to play initiative, which began on June 8. © Aaron Doster-USA TODAY Sports The NHL is going to have to determine how many positive tests for coronavirus would be considered an outbreak, as 15 players tested positive after reporting to training camp. What’s more, 11 additional players have tested positive for coronavirus outside of NHL training camps.

The offbeat environmental stories you might have missed this week . Catch up on the environmental headlines from the week , including the wonderful world of scientists' tattoos and much more.

As people around the world celebrate the 45th annual Earth Day this week , it's a good time to reflect on the many ways researchers in the College of Natural Sciences are helping tackle environmental challenges, including wildfires, drought, pollution, biodiversity loss

It also marked the 425th consecutive month, or 35 years, that temperatures were above average.

And the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says that trend isn't likely to stop with most of the U.S. facing the likelihood of a hotter-than-average summer going into July.

MORE: Why climate change is also a public health problem

Don't let the pandemic fool you, CO2 is at al all-time high

Despite reports early in the pandemic that keeping everybody at home led to reductions in pollution and wildlife reclaiming the streets, the gas that traps heat and adds to those record-high temperatures is at an all-time high.

a screenshot of a video game: Carbon dioxide levels in 2018 were higher than any other point in recorded history, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. © NASA Carbon dioxide levels in 2018 were higher than any other point in recorded history, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Carbon dioxide reached its highest level in 800,000 years, according to NASA.

Blazers coach Terry Stotts gushes about Jusuf Nurkic ahead of NBA resumption

  Blazers coach Terry Stotts gushes about Jusuf Nurkic ahead of NBA resumption Stotts also said that Nurkic will 'in all likelihood' be starting next to Carmelo Anthony but could possibly even start alongside fellow big man Hassan Whiteside.Speaking with the media Wednesday, Stotts raved about the Bosnian big’s physical condition and said he was ready for the NBA’s resumption in Orlando.

Environmental Issues News. June 29, 2020. 1. 2. Top Headlines . June 16, 2020 — Switching from general to regional anaesthesia may help cut greenhouse emissions and ultimately help reduce global warming, indicates a real life example at one US hospital over the course 5. Most Popular. this week .

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If levels continue to rise, the climate could face more above-average temperatures and other changes that would become more difficult to reverse.

Trump finalizing changes to 'magna carta' of environmental law

The COVID-19 pandemic and Black Lives Matter protests in recent weeks and months have increased attention on inequality in the country.

And at the same time the country is talking about dismantling systemic racism, environmentalists are concerned that a bedrock environmental law created to protect Black and brown communities from being taken advantage of is under threat.

The National Environmental Policy Act, or NEPA, requires the federal government to consider the impact projects like highways, bridges and pipelines have on the environment and the communities where they will be built.

Does Blue Jays being over 60-man limit suggest more positive COVID-19 tests?

  Does Blue Jays being over 60-man limit suggest more positive COVID-19 tests? Toronto originally announced a player pool with 58 names, so the addition of these four will put them over the limit. However, as Sportsnet’s Shi Davidi tweets, a team can exceed 60 players if exceptions need to be made due to positive COVID-19 tests. It’s likely, then, that the Jays either have had additional positives in the organization that will remove some players from the 60-man pool or that additional transactions are coming Thursday. Notably, the MLB.

Catch up on these headlines you might have missed . 1.) Special Counsel Robert Mueller has asked the FBI to investigate allegations an unidentified woman was

But, before you clock out we're looking back at the past seven days of alternative football. The sort of stuff that makes this circus of a sport gloriously weird. Here are 10 things you might have missed

In the late 1960s, as the great white flight was taking place out of cities and to the suburbs, the government started to plan giant freeway projects, many of which would have required demolishing parts of majority Black and brown neighborhoods in cities including Atlanta and Washington, D.C.

Those proposed freeways sparked protests nationwide -- eventually leading to the NEPA, a formal way citizens could express their opinion about projects in their community.

President Richard Nixon signed the NEPA into law in 1970, at a time when the country saw significantly more pollution because agencies like the Environmental Protection Agency didn't exist yet.

Donald Trump et al. standing next to a person wearing a suit and tie: In this Jan. 9, 2020, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks to the press at the White House in Washington, DC. © Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images, FILE In this Jan. 9, 2020, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks to the press at the White House in Washington, DC.

President Donald Trump and his administration say that the NEPA has slowed down infrastructure projects by requiring years and years of study and prompting lawsuits from outside groups.

On June 4, Trump signed an executive order to waive the NEPA and other laws, citing the need to boost the economy after the impact of the pandemic.

NFLPA recommends canceling all 2020 preseason games

  NFLPA recommends canceling all 2020 preseason games Of course, the NFL has full authority over whether to schedule preseason games or not, and it’s unclear whether the league will consider the union’s recommendation. As Breer points out, teams would lose out on gate revenue — if fans are allowed in stands, which is a dubious proposition — and local TV money. Plus, the NFL Network usually sees its highest ratings in August, so cancelling the preseason slate altogether would be a tough pill to swallow.Subscribe to Yardbarker's Morning Bark, the most comprehensive newsletter in sports. Customize your email to get the latest news on your favorite sports, teams and schools.

Headlines today are focusing on Ofsted's disappointment at schools over the progress of 'most able' students. But the soundbite misses out the 34 pages of Ofsted’s report, which highlight useful extra lessons and shows what schools are doing really well. Laura McInerney is editor of Schools Week .

You might know that his name was Alexander Hamilton, that he was one of America’s founding fathers, you might even know that he was the first secretary of the treasury and founded America’s financial system. But what do you know about his life, his story? In February of 2015 a musical premiered in

"From day one, my administration has made fixing this regulatory nightmare a top priority," he said at the signing.

The order says agencies can decide to bypass the NEPA, the Endangered Species Act and other laws to start projects immediately, but there's some disagreement about how much of an impact it will have because federal agencies haven't released information on which projects could be affected and if it could be challenged in court.

MORE: Trump administration moves to change landmark environmental law to speed up infrastructure projects

But environmental advocates say they're more concerned about changes to the NEPA the administration has been working on for a while because the White House Council on Environmental Quality has proposed changes that would alter the law permanently.

Environmental advocates say they're concerned those changes could lead to more projects that add to climate change -- causing emissions and take away the voice of Black and brown communities who are impacted by pollution the most.

The proposed changes would require that environmental impact statements are completed in a set amount of time and in some cases limited to a certain page limit.

It would also change how agencies handle public comments, because a key part of the NEPA is requiring the government to make the public aware of its plans and giving the community a chance to weigh in.

Multiple Blues players test positive for COVID-19

  Multiple Blues players test positive for COVID-19 While the NHL isn’t identifying who has tested positive for the coronavirus or which team(s) they play on, it appears that the Blues have been hit by the virus. Jeremy Rutherford of The Athletic reports (subscription required) that multiple players have tested positive and their identities have not been disclosed. As a result, the team has closed their practice facility through the weekend with the hopes of reopening on Monday. © William Purnell-USA TODAY Sports Some of the St. Louis Blues players have tested positive for COVID-19.

Critics of the change say the changes would make it more difficult for objections to a project to have an impact by requiring comments to be more narrow and specific and discounting concerns about a project like a highway or pipeline's impact on climate change.

a group of people standing next to an umbrella: In this Feb. 11, 2020, file photo taken in Denver, Jay Bender holds up an umbrella adorned with programs that would be affected at a rally to voice opposition to efforts by the Trump administration to weaken the National Environmental Policy Act. © David Zalubowski/AP, FILE In this Feb. 11, 2020, file photo taken in Denver, Jay Bender holds up an umbrella adorned with programs that would be affected at a rally to voice opposition to efforts by the Trump administration to weaken the National Environmental Policy Act.

Environmental advocates say construction of the wall at the southern border is already an example of what happens when the NEPA isn't available as a way to object to government projects.

"To put it simply, none of the wall construction we're seeing right now would be possible if NEPA was in place -- and most certainly not the massive groundwater extraction, saguaro destruction and blasting and bulldozing of Indigenous, sacred sites," Laiken Jordahl, from the Center for Biological Diversity, told ABC News.

Dozens of industry groups support changes proposed by the Trump administration, including the American Gas Association, National Miners Association, Wind Energy Association and even the American Sheep Industry Association.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is one of them, saying that improving the NEPA will make it easier for projects to get approved, including expanding industries like wind and solar energy.

"If we as a nation want be prepared to meet the challenge of climate, and to build an economy for the future. We've got to have a permitting process that allows us to do that," Marty Durbin, president of the Chamber of Commerce's Global Energy Institute, told ABC News.

MORE: What you can do to help prevent climate change, according to experts

Durbin said it's not about ignoring environmental advice, simply streamlining the process.

"There's simply no reason right now to have a system that takes more than seven years to even get a yes or no answer on whether you can build a newer, improved highway," he said.

The Office of Management and Budget has indicated that the proposed changes to the NEPA are in their last stages, meaning the final rule could be announced at any time.

Groups like Earthjustice said they plan to sue to challenge the changes as soon as they become final and other experts said there could be a push for Congress to ensure environmental reviews and public comment are part of any federal project.

Why the Larger Climate Movement Is Finally Embracing the Fight Against Environmental Racism .
The larger climate movement is finally embracing the fight against environmental racismThe workers escaped with only a few minor injuries, but the facility had already spent decades killing its neighbors in South Philadelphia. The refinery–the largest on the East Coast, dating back to the early days of the oil industry in the 19th century–was single-handedly responsible for more than half of the city’s cancer-causing air toxics, according to a report from the city. And it contributed to the 125 premature deaths that the American Thoracic Society and New York University say result from air pollution in Philadelphia each year.

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