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Politics NYT editorial board calls for the reopening of schools with help from federal government's 'checkbook'

04:40  12 july  2020
04:40  12 july  2020 Source:   thehill.com

Trump says 'may cut off funding' if U.S. schools do not open

  Trump says 'may cut off funding' if U.S. schools do not open Trump says 'may cut off funding' if U.S. schools do not open"The Dems think it would be bad for them politically if U.S. schools open before the November Election, but is important for the children & families. May cut off funding if not open!" Trump said on Twitter, pointing to schools reopening in some European countries with no problems.

The editorial board is a group of opinion journalists whose views are informed by expertise, research, debate To maximize in-person instruction, the federal government must open its checkbook . It might succeed in reopening schools for a time , but it is not likely to allow schools to remain open .

Opening safely during a pandemic, and being able to stay open , requires planning carefully — and usually spending significant amounts of money, to pay for testing, cleaning and new social-distancing procedures. Across the political spectrum, there have been calls for the reopening of U. S . schools

The New York Times editorial board is calling for schools to reopen in the fall, with the caveat that school systems need the federal government to open its checkbook to make it work.

a person sitting at a table: NYT editorial board calls for the reopening of schools with help from federal government's 'checkbook' © istock NYT editorial board calls for the reopening of schools with help from federal government's 'checkbook'

In an editorial published Saturday, the board advocated for children to return to the classrooms, saying that they "need food and friendships; books and basketball courts; time away from family and a safe place to spend it."

The board said that in order maximize in-person instruction, "the federal government must open its checkbook," citing an estimate from the School Superintendents Association that found necessary protective measures would cost an average of about $1.8 million per school district across the U.S.

Trump says he disagrees with CDC school reopening guidelines, calls them 'impractical'

  Trump says he disagrees with CDC school reopening guidelines, calls them 'impractical' President Trump on Wednesday said he disagreed with the CDC on their “very tough & expensive” guidelines on reopening schools in the fall.“I disagree with @CDCgov on their very tough & expensive guidelines for opening schools,” Trump tweeted Wednesday. “While they want them open, they are asking schools to do very impractical things.

President Trump called the CDC guidelines too tough and threatened to cut federal funding to schools that wouldn't reopen in the fall. For the next round of funding, the Democratic-controlled House is unlikely to agree to target it only to reopened schools .

After closing schools to prevent the spread of COVID-19, countries from Denmark to Japan have started to reopen their classrooms, with new measures in place. Frequent hand-washing, plastic partitions and socially distanced classrooms, are all part of the ' new normal' for the world' s classrooms.

The reopening of schools has been a hotly contested topic in recent days as the coronavirus rages on in the country and poses risks to groups who gather indoors.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated their guidance for schools on how to reopen safely, but President Trump pushed back on the recommendations, calling the guidelines "very tough & expensive."

"President Trump could set an example by wearing a mask, and by urging states to require masks. He could work to expand testing. He could work to get money to schools," the board wrote.

"Instead, Mr. Trump has sent tweets, demanding in ALL CAPS that schools reopen - and threatening to cut off existing federal funding."

The Trump administration this week took an aggressive stance reopening schools in the fall, threatening to cut schools' federal funding if they fail to do so. Public schools, however, rely on local funds for the majority of their operations.

New York Gov. Cuomo blasts Trump on school reopenings: 'It's not up to the president'

  New York Gov. Cuomo blasts Trump on school reopenings: 'It's not up to the president' New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo blasted President Donald Trump on Wednesday for pressuring state officials to reopen schools this fall, saying the federal government doesn't have any authority over the matter. "School reopenings are a state decision. Period. That is the law and that is the way we're going to proceed. It's not up the President of the United States," Cuomo said during a news briefing in Albany. "The president does not have any authority to open schools. We will open the schools if it is safe to open the schools. Everybody wants the schools open.

Federal materials for reopening schools , shared the week President Trump demanded weaker guidelines to do so, said fully reopening schools and Dr. Anthony S . Fauci at a coronavirus task force’ s meeting in June.Credit Michael A. McCoy for The New York Times . President Trump and Dr

President Donald Trump says schools in the United States should reopen , pointing to countries where kids are back in classrooms without causing major You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience. US schools reopening : Trump pointed to

The board noted that moving learning online puts low-income students - who already face obstacles in education - at a disadvantage because they are more likely to lack consistent access to technology at home.

"The limits of virtual classrooms were on painful display this spring," the board wrote. "While some students thrived, or at least continued to learn, others faded away."

Educational leaders including those at the prominent American Federation of Teachers union have called for Senate Republicans to approve additional federal funding to ensure that both teachers and students are safe from COVID-19 in schools.

The House passed the HEROES Act, another massive coronavirus stimulus bill in May that includes some funding for public schools, but Senate Republicans have not yet considered additional stimulus legislation.

The also board urged Trump to do what he can under his authority to push for additional school funding.

Trump says ‘virtual learning has proven to be terrible,’ threatens cuts to federal funds

  Trump says ‘virtual learning has proven to be terrible,’ threatens cuts to federal funds President Trump on Friday slammed “virtual learning,” claiming it has “proven to be terrible.”“Now that we have witnessed it on a large scale basis, and firsthand, Virtual Learning has proven to be TERRIBLE compared to School, or on Campus, Learning,” Trump tweeted early Friday. “Not even close! Schools must open in the Fall.

If not open , why would the Federal Government give Funding? Florida' s one state where Trump' s reopening school message is sticking. Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis weighed the increase of cases against the education gap that can come from students learning at home.

Here’ s what you need to know The Federal Reserve says unemployment will remain high as it leaves interest rates near zero. Lockdowns are ending in many developing countries, even as cases rise. 2017.Credit Demetrius Freeman for The New York Times .

At the end of the op-ed, the board also pointed out that schools provide childcare for families, some of whom may be essential workers, citing an estimate from the consulting firm McKinsey, that found 27 million American workers require the assistance of child care.

"Parents need public schools, too," they wrote. "They need help raising their children, and they need to work."


Video: Educators express coronavirus concerns as school year approaches (WKYC-TV Cleveland)

Teachers' unions aren't the problem — federal inaction is .
Time will tell whether we are overreacting, as many conservatives contend, or whether our current actions will be credited with saving many lives. I hope that conservatives will be shown to be correct. Like my colleagues, I very much want to be back in school. Until then, safety must come first. Glenn Sacks teaches social studies and is co-chairman of United Teachers of Los Angeles at James Monroe High School in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Follow him on Twitter @Glenn Sacks.

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