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Politics Editor's Note: Eastman's Newsweek Column Has Nothing to Do With Racist Birtherism

08:05  13 august  2020
08:05  13 august  2020 Source:   newsweek.com

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  Eastman Kodak's $765 million U.S. loan agreement on hold after recent allegations Eastman Kodak's $765 million U.S. loan agreement on hold after recent allegations(Reuters) - Eastman Kodak Co's $765 million loan agreement with the U.S. government to produce pharmaceutical ingredients has been put on hold due to "recent allegations of wrongdoing," the U.S. International Development Finance Corp (DFC) said.

Newsweek is being attacked after they ran an opinion column by John Eastman , a law professor at And the Birtherism begins… RT @DrJohnEastman: Is Kamala Harris eligible for the office of Vice Here’ s my article, published by Newsweek , exploring the issues. Short answer: It depends! https

( Note the names of the cabinets) this makes me sick to my stomach if it' s true," redditor The conspiracy theory has been elaborated on other social media platforms, particularly Twitter In chat conversations with Newsweek , PrincessPeach1987 described seeking out garage storage with their

Some of our readers have reacted strongly to the op-ed we published by Dr. John Eastman, assuming it to be an attempt to ignite a racist conspiracy theory around Kamala Harris' candidacy. Dr. Eastman was focusing on a long-standing, somewhat arcane legal debate about the precise meaning of the phrase "subject to the jurisdiction thereof" in the Citizenship Clause of the 14th Amendment. His essay has no connection whatsoever to co-called "birther-ism," the racist 2008 conspiracy theory aimed at delegitimizing then-candidate Barack Obama by claiming, baselessly, that he was born not in Hawaii but in Kenya. We share our readers' revulsion at those vile lies.

Birthers Are Already Going After Kamala Harris

  Birthers Are Already Going After Kamala Harris Kamala Harris has been Joe Biden’s running mate for less than a week, but the birthers are already questioning whether she’s constitutionally eligible to ever be president. On Tuesday, a day after the former vice president announced that the California senator would be his running mate, Newsweek ran an op-ed questioning Harris’ eligibility. The argument by John Eastman, a law professor at Chapman University and a failed GOP candidate, centers around the status of Harris’ parents. “Her father was (and is) a Jamaican national, her mother was from India, and neither was a naturalized U.S. citizen at the time of Harris’ birth in 1964,” he wrote.

Scientists in China have raised concerns the new coronavirus, named COVID-19, may affect male fertility. However, experts in the field has stressed to Newsweek that men should not be worried. Chinese researchers were looking at existing data on a receptor that COVID-19 is thought to use to

Trump has repeatedly claimed he' s "the least racist person." The record suggests otherwise. If you ask President Donald Trump, he isn’t racist . To the contrary, he’ s repeatedly said that he’ s “the least (The research has found a strong correlation between “ birtherism ,” as this conspiracy theory is called

Kamala Harris looking at the camera: California Senator Kamala Harris announced the suspension her presidential campaign Tuesday, prompting an array of supportive responses from former campaign rivals. © KAMM/AFP/Getty California Senator Kamala Harris announced the suspension her presidential campaign Tuesday, prompting an array of supportive responses from former campaign rivals.

The 14th Amendment is one of the most-studied areas of constitutional law, and questions were raised by the Constitution's Article II, Section 1 "natural born Citizen" requirement for presidential eligibility about both John McCain and Ted Cruz, at the time of their respective runs. The meaning of "natural born Citizen," and the relation of that Article II textual requirement to the 14th Amendment's Citizenship Clause, are issues of legal interpretation about which scholars and commentators can, and will, robustly disagree.

Democrats hammer Trump for entertaining false birther theory about Harris

  Democrats hammer Trump for entertaining false birther theory about Harris President Trump on Thursday drew swift backlash after he declined to disavow a baseless and racist conspiracy theory that Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) would not be eligible to serve as vice president.Trump at a news conference was asked about an op-ed in Newsweek that was shared by an adviser to his campaign that raised the possibility Harris, who was born in Oakland, Calif., to immigrant parents, does not meet the requirements to hold the office. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

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During questioning about the racist note left in the room, campus police separately confronted Yang about Royal' s mysterious sickness. "The Lehigh University Police Department has worked closely with the District Attorney' s Office on the investigation and will continue to do so," a spokeswoman for

Debating the meaning of these constitutional provisions and, in the particular case of Dr. Eastman's piece, the meaning of the 14th Amendment's phrase "subject to the jurisdiction thereof," is not an attempt to deny facts or to make false claims. No one is questioning Harris' place of birth or the legitimacy of an obviously valid birth certificate.

On the contrary, leading law schools have long entertained debates between competing scholars about the original public meaning of the Citizenship Clause. The issue discussed in these debates, and contested by Dr. Eastman, is whether birthright citizenship (jus soli, birth by soil), as opposed to merely citizenship by parentage (jus sanguinis, that is, citizenship by citizenship of one's parents at time of birth), is textually mandated. Again, scholars can, and do, disagree on this point.

Jared Kushner denies Trump 'promoting' questions about Kamala Harris

  Jared Kushner denies Trump 'promoting' questions about Kamala Harris Jared Kushner, President Trump's son-in-law and a senior adviser in the White House, insisted in an interview Friday that the president was not "promoting" false questions a day earlier about whether Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) is qualified to be president. Harris was born in the United States to a Jamaican father and Indian mother, and there is no question she meets the constitutional requirements to be vice president or president. ButHarris was born in the United States to a Jamaican father and Indian mother, and there is no question she meets the constitutional requirements to be vice president or president.

But as CBS News correspondent Major Garrett reported, the nation has observed Mr. Trump, as candidate and president, judge based on race. Mr. Trump' s willingness to invite charges of racism is now a staple of his presidency, as is the resiliency of his support, foreshadowed by his own words

"Was birtherism racist ?" Axios' Jonathan Swan asked. Former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson reportedly told a House committee that Jared Kushner' s unorthodox approach to diplomacy made it hard to understand what he was doing with world leaders, and he was at risk of being outmaneuvered.

Some scholars contend that "subject to the jurisdiction thereof" refers to a "partial" jurisdiction (e.g., when a citizen travels to a foreign land and is subject to the criminal laws of that foreign land), and some contend that it refers to a "complete" jurisdiction, which means political allegiance (hence, jus sanguinis). This "natural born Citizen" presidential requirement was debated during the 2000 and 2008 presidential campaigns of McCain (born in the Panama Canal Zone), the 2016 presidential campaign of Cruz (born in Calgary, Alberta), and at other times. In Harris' case, because her parents were not U.S. citizens at the time of her birth, her "natural born Citizen" status—a constitutional requirement for the presidency—is necessarily dependent on whether the 14th Amendment Citizenship Clause mandates jus soli, as opposed to just jus sanguinis (holding aside any independent congressional legislation in this field).

The author of the op-ed, John Eastman, a Ph.D. and longtime law professor/former law school dean who has litigated countless cases at the Supreme Court and previously clerked for Justice Clarence Thomas, is a preeminent constitutional scholar widely associated with the legal argument that the aforementioned Clause does not constitutionally mandate jus soli. (Josh Hammer, Newsweek's opinion editor, is a published constitutional scholar and former federal court of appeals law clerk who was involved in helping Senator Cruz's 2016 presidential campaign rebut the erroneous claims that Cruz was ineligible on "natural born Citizen" grounds.)

The debate pertaining to the precise constitutional requirements for the Article II phrase "natural born Citizen," having been aired in 2000, 2008 and 2016, is unlikely to fall quiet soon.

Nancy Cooper

Global Editor in Chief

Josh Hammer

Opinion Editor

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Meadows says Harris is eligible to be vice president, pushing back on birther claims .
White House chief of staff Mark Meadows said that Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), who was named as presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden's running mate last week, is eligible to serve as vice president, after President Trump discussed a conspiracy theory that raised doubts about her qualifications. CNN's Jake Tapper asked Meadows on "State of the Union" on Sunday whether Harris was eligible to become vice president, prompting the chief of staff to answer, "Sure.

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