•   
  •   
  •   

Politics Hillicon Valley: Trump backs potential Oracle-TikTok deal | Facebook removes hundreds of QAnon groups, pages | Police used facial recognition software in BLM probe

02:25  20 august  2020
02:25  20 august  2020 Source:   thehill.com

Hillicon Valley: 'Fortnite' owner sues Apple after game is removed from App Store | Federal agencies seize, dismantle cryptocurrency campaigns of major terrorist organizations

  Hillicon Valley: 'Fortnite' owner sues Apple after game is removed from App Store | Federal agencies seize, dismantle cryptocurrency campaigns of major terrorist organizations Welcome to Hillicon Valley, The Hill's newsletter detailing all you need to know about the tech and cyber news from Capitol Hill to Silicon Valley. If you don't already, be sure to sign up for our newsletter with this LINK.Welcome! Follow our cyber reporter, Maggie Miller (@magmill95), and tech reporter, Chris Mills Rodrigo (@chrisismills), for more coverage.A REAL BATTLE ROYALE: Epic Games filed a lawsuit against Apple Thursday after its wildly popular video game "Fortnite" was removed from the App Store.The suit, filed in a Northern California federal court, argues that Fortnite's removal constitutes "anti competitive conduct.

a large tower that has a sign on the side of a building: Hillicon Valley: Trump backs potential Oracle-TikTok deal | Facebook removes hundreds of QAnon groups, pages | Police used facial recognition software in BLM probe © Getty Images Hillicon Valley: Trump backs potential Oracle-TikTok deal | Facebook removes hundreds of QAnon groups, pages | Police used facial recognition software in BLM probe

Welcome to Hillicon Valley, The Hill's newsletter detailing all you need to know about the tech and cyber news from Capitol Hill to Silicon Valley. If you don't already, be sure to sign up for our newsletter with this LINK.

Welcome! Follow our cyber reporter, Maggie Miller (@magmill95), and tech reporter, Chris Mills Rodrigo (@chrisismills), for more coverage.

How the forced sale of TikTok could splinter the internet

  How the forced sale of TikTok could splinter the internet The first social app to be broken up on national security grounds probably won’t be the lastThe timing was abrupt. The authoritarian cast of President Trump’s remarks on the subject was disturbing. And yet, for those of us who have followed TikTok’s trajectory this year, nothing that has happened over the past two weeks can truly be said to be surprising.

TRUMP BACKS ORACLE BID: President Trump on Tuesday voiced support for a potential acquisition of TikTok's U.S. operations by Oracle, adding to the existing uncertainty over the sale of the Chinese owned short-form video app.

"Well, I think Oracle is a great company, and I think its owner is a tremendous guy," Trump said at an event in Yuma, Ariz., when asked about reports that the software company is in talks to acquire TikTok's business in the U.S., Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

Trump in early August signed a pair of orders that would effectively ban TikTok and the messaging app WeChat from operating in the U.S. after Sept. 20. Trump invoked the International Emergency Economic Powers Act and said his move was in response to TikTok's collection of user data and concerns it could be shared with China's government.

How the ‘QAnon factor’ is playing out in Florida’s GOP primaries

  How the ‘QAnon factor’ is playing out in Florida’s GOP primaries In Tuesday’s Republican primary elections in Florida, dozens of candidates will be seeking the party’s nomination for its 27 congressional seats. At least seven of them, including two who are running in Trump’s home district, have, to varying degrees, embraced or promoted content related to QAnon — the internet-based conspiracy theory that has been deemed a potential domestic terrorist threat by the FBI. The candidates seeking Republican nominations in the Sunshine State are part of a growing list of 2020 primary and general election hopefuls who have been linked to QAnon, a loose movement of people who believe, or claim to believe, in secret, cryptic messages post

The order declared that any transaction with ByteDance would be prohibited in the U.S. in 45 days, essentially giving the company a short period to sell TikTok to a U.S. owner.

Trump last week signed another executive order demanding ByteDance divest its American assets and any U.S. data from TikTok within 90 days.

Microsoft had emerged as the favorite to purchase the company's U.S. operations, with the company and TikTok both confirming that negotiations are ongoing.

When asked if he had a preference on Microsoft or Oracle making a deal with TikTok, Trump demurred.

"Well, I guess Microsoft wants it and so does Oracle, and probably so do other people, but they have to also make sure the United States is well compensated because we're the ones making it possible," he said Tuesday, referencing his questionable demand that the Treasury Department get a payout in any deal.

Trump has a number of ties to Oracle.

Facebook removes hundreds of QAnon groups

  Facebook removes hundreds of QAnon groups Facebook is finally cracking down on QAnon: after weeks of pressure, the company says it has removed hundreds of groups and pages and blocked thousands of ads tied to the far-right conspiracy theory. The move is the social network’s biggest effort to take on the movement, which the FBI warned could pose a domestic terror threat. Under its new policy, Facebook isn’t banning QAnon supporters entirely, but is cracking down on those that “discuss potential violence,” and taking steps to make other QAnon accounts less visible. Facebook will also block QAnon accounts from running ads, selling products or using other monetization features.

Read more here.

FACEBOOK TAKES AIM AT QANON: Facebook on Wednesday banned roughly 900 groups and pages and 1,500 ads related to the QAnon conspiracy theory.

The removals were part of an expansion of the platform's policies on violent rhetoric, which also resulted in 10,000 Instagram pages and nearly 2,000 Facebook groups associated with QAnon having their reach limited.

The QAnon theory baselessly claims that President Trump and the military are working together to expose a shadowy cabal of figures in media, entertainment and politics that are trafficking children.

In a blog post explaining the policy change Wednesday, Facebook noted that groups and pages dedicated to the theory have increasingly become a place to celebrate violent actions, even if some of them are not directly used to organize those actions.

The FBI labeled the loose QAnon community a potential domestic terror threat last year.

Moving forward, the pages affiliated with QAnon - as well as ones ties to "offline anarchist groups that support violent acts amidst protests" and "US-based militia organizations" - will be prohibited from purchasing ads or selling products in the platform's marketplaces.

Trump has officially turned the GOP into the QAnon Party

  Trump has officially turned the GOP into the QAnon Party Republicans like to think of themselves as the "Party of Lincoln." Trump's endorsement of bigots and QAnon makes them the party of the internet troll.But it's possible that he just changed the Republican Party forever.

Nonprofits that Facebook identifies as supporting those movements will also be barred from using the platform's fundraising tools.

QAnon, militia and anarchist protest groups will also be pushed down on users' newsfeeds and search engines.

Read more about the move here.

FACIAL RECOGNITION AND BLM: The New York Police Department (NYPD) said it used facial recognition software during its investigation targeting Black Lives Matter organizer Derrick Ingram, who saw his apartment surrounded by officers, police dogs and a helicopter earlier this month as part of the operation.

A spokeswoman for the agency told The Hill on Wednesday that "facial recognition software was utilized in accordance with department policy" during the "course of the investigation."

"The NYPD uses facial recognition as a limited investigative tool, comparing a still image from a surveillance video to a pool of lawfully possessed arrest photos," the department, which has been using the technology since 2011, added.

"This technology helps bring justice to victims of crimes. A facial recognition match is a lead. No one has ever been arrested solely on the basis of a computer match, no matter how compelling."

Gothamist was the first outlet to report the news and also obtained a screen grab from footage of the operation captured earlier this month that showed an officer holding a paper reading at the top "Facial Identification Section Informational Lead Report," along with a photo it identified of Ingram.

Hillicon Valley: Trump weighs in on QAnon for first time | Uber, Lyft granted temporary respite | Susan Rice raises concerns about Russian hacking

  Hillicon Valley: Trump weighs in on QAnon for first time | Uber, Lyft granted temporary respite | Susan Rice raises concerns about Russian hacking Welcome to Hillicon Valley, The Hill's newsletter detailing all you need to know about the tech and cyber news from Capitol Hill to Silicon Valley. If you don't already, be sure to sign up for our newsletter with this LINK.Welcome! Follow our cyber reporter, Maggie Miller (@magmill95), and tech reporter, Chris Mills Rodrigo (@chrisismills), for more coverage.TRUMP COMMENTS ON Q: President Trump on Wednesday offered measured praise for followers of the QAnon conspiracy theory, saying he's not very familiar with the movement but that he believes its subscribers "love our country.

Read more here.

BIG APPLE: Apple Inc. became the first American company to reach a market cap of $2 trillion on Wednesday as its share price hit $467.

The Silicon Valley giant first reached a $1 trillion market cap in August 2018, meaning the company managed to double in valuation in just two years.

Apple's meteoric growth is emblematic of tech's market success more broadly.

Amazon, Microsoft and Alphabet all have market caps over $1 trillion.

During the coronavirus pandemic, which has bankrupted thousands of businesses and cost millions their jobs, tech companies have flourished.

These four tech companies along with Facebook constitute 20 percent of the S&P 500, and have carried its growth during a time when most other companies in the index have experienced losses.

Read more here.

HEALTH MISINFO SPREADING ON FACEBOOK: Networks spreading health misinformation have received 3.8 billion views on Facebook in the past year, a new report finds.

The peak of the misinformation came as the coronavirus pandemic was reaching its worst in April, with those networks receiving roughly 460 million views in just a month, according to the report from nonprofit advocacy group Avaaz released Wednesday.

The reach of the top spreaders of health misinformation far eclipsed that of leading health organizations on the platform, according to the report, which also raises concerns about Facebook's efforts to rein in misleading content.

Researchers found that only 16 percent of the health misinformation they uncovered had a warning label placed on it.

Inside the Completely Nutso Universe of QAnon

  Inside the Completely Nutso Universe of QAnon The deranged QAnon conspiracy theory movement came close to a presidential endorsement this week when Donald Trump praised the group as “people that love our country,” while refusing to disavow their bizarre beliefs, which include a faith that he’ll eventually arrest and execute his political opponents. Trump’s remarks were the latest, and perhaps most alarming, illustration of the gains QAnon adherents have made within the GOP even as the FBI warns that it’s a potential domestic terror movement. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

"Facebook's algorithm is a major threat to public health," said Fadi Quran, campaign director at Avaaz. "Mark Zuckerberg promised to provide reliable information during the pandemic, but his algorithm is sabotaging those efforts by driving many of Facebook's 2.7 billion users to health misinformation spreading networks."

The findings are especially concerning given the material effects of conspiracy theories and unfounded claims about the coronavirus.

Read more here.

Lighter click: Positive stress relief

An op-ed to chew on: We must retain foreign Ph.D.'s to keep America's innovation advantage

NOTABLE LINKS FROM AROUND THE WEB:

Black founders and CEO face bias, racism and harassment as they've tried to pitch their companies to investors (Protocol / Emily Birnbaum)

Bolton: Russia, China 'undoubtedly' interfering in U.S. elections (CyberScoop / Shannon Vavra)

Fearing coronavirus, a Michigan university tracks its students with a flawed app (TechCrunch / Zack Whittaker)

Big Tech's domination of business reaches new heights (The New York Times / Peter Eavis and Steve Lohr)

How Fortnite's epic battle with Apple could reshape the antitrust fight (The Verge / Russell Brandom)

Hillicon Valley: TikTok sues Trump administration over executive order | Zoom reports widespread outages impacting schools, hearings | Federal cyber agency releases strategy to secure 5G networks .
Welcome to Hillicon Valley, The Hill's newsletter detailing all you need to know about the tech and cyber news from Capitol Hill to Silicon Valley. If you don't already, be sure to sign up for our newsletter with this LINK.Welcome! Follow our cyber reporter, Maggie Miller (@magmill95), and tech reporter, Chris Mills Rodrigo (@chrisismills), for more coverage.TIKTOK HITS BACK: TikTok announced Monday that it is suing the Trump administration over its executive order aimed at banning the short-form video app from the country.

usr: 1
This is interesting!