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Politics Trump says he may not OK stricter FDA standards for vaccine approval

16:30  24 september  2020
16:30  24 september  2020 Source:   cbsnews.com

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Washington — President Trump on Wednesday suggested he may not approve more stringent standards for issuing an emergency use authorization for a coronavirus vaccine from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Donald Trump sitting at a desk in front of a building: President Trump Holds A News Conference At The White House © Joshua Roberts / Getty Images President Trump Holds A News Conference At The White House

"We're looking at that and that has to be approved by the White House," Mr. Trump told reporters during a press briefing at the White House. "We may or may not approve it."

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The Washington Post reported this week the FDA is issuing new, more rigorous guidance for an emergency use authorization of a coronavirus vaccine, which would make it more difficult for a vaccine to be ready by Election Day.

The president has repeatedly suggested a vaccine would arrive before November 3, though top public health officials have thrown cold water on Mr. Trump's speedy timeline, warning a coronavirus vaccine likely will not be ready for distribution to the general population until well into 2021.

Mr. Trump told reporters the tightened standards from the FDA "sounds like a political move," and cited the pharmaceutical companies — Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson and Moderna — that are developing coronavirus vaccines and have begun final-stage testing.

Fauci says he will take responsibility if a coronavirus vaccine rolled out in the US is faulty

  Fauci says he will take responsibility if a coronavirus vaccine rolled out in the US is faulty In comments to media outlets Thursday Fauci sought to reassure the public amid a dispute between Trump and the CDC over vaccines."Do you assure all of us that if the corners have been cut, if there is something sideways or wrong with the process, that you will tell us and take the heat for that?" MSNBC's Chris Hayes asked Fauci.

The president said delaying a vaccine by "two or three weeks" would cost lives.

The FDA declined to comment.

Through its initiative Operation Warp Speed, the Trump administration has prioritized swift development and distribution of a coronavirus vaccine, setting a goal of delivering hundreds of millions of doses by January 2021. Four vaccine candidates are in the final stage of testing in the U.S.

Trump Must Stop Criticizing Scientists Amid COVID-19 Vaccine Talks: Experts to FDA .
More than two dozen said they were concerned about decision-making at the agency.The letter was signed by 33 doctors and academics, including Dr. Eric Topol, director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute, former chief FDA scientist Dr. Luciana Borio, and Dr. Aaron Kesselheim, head of the Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, and Law at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital.

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