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Politics Poll: 57 percent of Americans think next president, Senate should fill Ginsburg vacancy

05:15  26 september  2020
05:15  26 september  2020 Source:   thehill.com

McConnell vows quick vote on next justice; Biden says wait

  McConnell vows quick vote on next justice; Biden says wait WASHINGTON (AP) — The death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg just six weeks before the election cast an immediate spotlight on the crucial high court vacancy, with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell quickly vowing to bring to a vote whoever President Donald Trump nominates. Democratic nominee Joe Biden vigorously disagreed, declaring that "voters should pick the president and the president should pick the justice to consider.” require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); McConnell, who sets the calendar in the U.S.

President Trump plans to announce on Saturday that Judge Amy Coney Barrett is his choice for the Supreme Court.Credit Samuel Corum for The New York Times.

Most swing-state voters think Trump should not fill Supreme Court vacancy if he loses 2020 election, new poll 57 % likely voters say Trump and Senate should not move forward with SCOTUS vote. Republicans aim to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg 's death

A majority of Americans in a new poll say the next president should fill the Supreme Court vacancy left after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg et al. that are talking to each other: Poll: 57 percent of Americans think next president, Senate should fill Ginsburg vacancy © Getty Poll: 57 percent of Americans think next president, Senate should fill Ginsburg vacancy

Ginsburg's death has set off a partisan battle as President Trump plans to fill the new vacancy swiftly during an election year.

Fifty-seven percent of adults surveyed in an ABC News-Washington Post poll released Friday said that the winner of the November presidential election should choose Ginsburg's successor, while 38 percent said they would like to see Trump and the current Senate move forward with plans to confirm a new justice.

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Welcome to Pollapalooza, our weekly polling roundup. Poll (s) of the week The death of Justice Ruth Bader President Trump says he will nominate a replacement for Ginsburg on Saturday, and Senate Majority But another 13 percent said it should happen “after the 2020 election but before the next

President Donald Trump and White House pandemic adviser Scott Atlas speak to reporters during a news 17:00 ET – Poll : Majority of Americans think new president should pick justice. The poll shows a switch from 2016, when 57 percent said President Barack Obama should have been the

The results are sharply split along partisan lines, with 90 percent of Democrats saying they want the next president and Senate to choose the next justice and 80 percent of Republicans saying they want Trump and the current Senate to fill the seat.

Sixty-one percent of independents say they want the winner of the election to pick the next justice.

Overall, 50 percent of adults in the poll said they trust Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden more to handle the issue, while 42 percent say they trust Trump more.

The Supreme Court fight also appears to be energizing Biden's base in the final sprint to Election Day, with 64 percent of his backers in the survey saying the issue makes it more important to them that he wins. Only 37 percent of Trump supporters say the same of the president.

Is 8 enough? Court vacancy could roil possible election case

  Is 8 enough? Court vacancy could roil possible election case WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death has left the Supreme Court shorthanded during a polarizing presidential campaign in which President Donald Trump has already suggested he may not accept the outcome and the court could be called on to step in and decide the fate of the nation. It's the second time in four years that a justice has died during an election year, though that eight-justice court was not asked to referee any election disputes in 2016. Today, both sides have armies of lawyers ready to take the outcome to court.

The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has set off a partisan squabble over filling her seat on the Supreme Court. It is telling that both Justices Antonin Scalia and Ginsburg bemoaned the current confirmation process, each expressing doubt that they could now be confirmed. What to Read Next .

A majority of Americans believe the winner of the presidential election should appoint the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg ’s replacement to the Supreme Court In March 2016, following the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, 57 percent of Americans said then- President Obama should appoint his

The poll comes as Senate Republicans, led by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), plow ahead with plans to confirm Trump's Supreme Court pick. The president has said he will announce his nominee to replace Ginsburg on Saturday.

Senate Democrats have issued a flood of rebukes against their GOP colleagues, accusing them of hypocrisy after they blocked a Supreme Court nominee picked by former President Obama from getting a confirmation hearing in 2016, the last presidential election year.

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden has also said the winner of the election should pick the next justice.

"Let me be clear that the voters should pick the president and the president should pick the justice for the Senate to consider," the former vice president said last week.

But McConnell appears to have already locked down the number of votes he needs to push a nominee over the 50-vote threshold. Sens. Susan Collins (R-Maine) and Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), are the only two who have voiced opposition to the vote.

The partisan brawl has led to a flood of calls from Democratic activists, as well as some lawmakers, for the party to add justices to the Supreme Court in the next Congress if it takes control of the Senate.

Doing so would require abolishing the 60-vote filibuster for legislation, a controversial move that does not have unanimous support among Democratic senators.

The prospect of packing the court remains unpopular with Americans, according to Friday's poll, with 54 percent of respondents saying they oppose adding justices, while 32 percent support expanding the Supreme Court.

The ABC News-Washington Post poll surveyed 1,008 adults from Sept. 21-24 and has a margin of error of 3.5 percentage points.

Fact check: It's true. Ginsburg and Scalia were close friends despite ideological differences .
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