•   
  •   
  •   

Politics Supreme Court confirmation hearings to start in two weeks, Sen. Lindsey Graham says

18:40  27 september  2020
18:40  27 september  2020 Source:   msn.com

McConnell vows quick vote on next justice; Biden says wait

  McConnell vows quick vote on next justice; Biden says wait WASHINGTON (AP) — The death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg just six weeks before the election cast an immediate spotlight on the crucial high court vacancy, with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell quickly vowing to bring to a vote whoever President Donald Trump nominates. Democratic nominee Joe Biden vigorously disagreed, declaring that "voters should pick the president and the president should pick the justice to consider.” require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); McConnell, who sets the calendar in the U.S.

  • Hearings to consider President Donald Trump's nominee to fill the Supreme Court seat vacated after the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg are set to begin Oct. 12, Senator Lindsey Graham said late Saturday.
  • The announcement from Graham, who leads the Senate Judiciary Committee, came hours after Trump formally named Amy Coney Barrett as his selection, the third nomination of his tenure so far.
  • The development is considered a major victory for conservatives. If Barrett is confirmed, conservatives would hold a 6-3 majority on the highest American court.
  • Meanwhile, Democrats have warned that the move will imperil abortion rights for women and the availability of health care for millions of Americans under the Affordable Care Act.
Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: US President Donald Trump announces his US Supreme Court nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett (R), in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC on September 26, 2020. © Provided by CNBC US President Donald Trump announces his US Supreme Court nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett (R), in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC on September 26, 2020.

Hearings to consider President Donald Trump's nominee to fill the Supreme Court seat vacated after the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg are set to begin Oct. 12, Senator Lindsey Graham said late Saturday.

Is 8 enough? Court vacancy could roil possible election case

  Is 8 enough? Court vacancy could roil possible election case WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death has left the Supreme Court shorthanded during a polarizing presidential campaign in which President Donald Trump has already suggested he may not accept the outcome and the court could be called on to step in and decide the fate of the nation. It's the second time in four years that a justice has died during an election year, though that eight-justice court was not asked to referee any election disputes in 2016. Today, both sides have armies of lawyers ready to take the outcome to court.

The announcement from Graham, who leads the Senate Judiciary Committee, came hours after Trump formally named Amy Coney Barrett as his selection, the third nomination of his tenure so far.

The move, coming less than 40 days before the Nov. 3 general election, shows the accelerated timeline in which Trump and other Republicans hope to install Barrett.

The time from nomination to the start of Senate hearings for the previous three Supreme Court justices have taken more than three times longer than in this case.

"Judge Barrett has a sterling academic and legal background, having clerked for Judge Laurence Silberman on the DC Circuit Court of Appeals and Justice Antonin Scalia on the U.S. Supreme Court," Graham said in his statement.

Fact check: Viral posts falsely claim Ruth Bader Ginsburg had already died

  Fact check: Viral posts falsely claim Ruth Bader Ginsburg had already died Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Sept. 18, but some viral posts falsely claim she died up to 2 years ago.Ruth Bader Ginsburg reflects on being 'notorious' in first appearance since cancer treatment

Barrett later became a professor at Notre Dame Law School for 15 years before being named by Trump as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in 2017.

Trump's nomination has seized attention in an already intense election cycle dominated by the coronavirus pandemic and the ensuing economic collapse.

The development, set into motion by the Sept. 18 death of Bader Ginsburg, is considered a major victory for conservatives. If Barrett is confirmed, conservatives would hold a 6-3 majority on the highest American court. Trump appears to have enough support from Senate Republicans to confirm Barrett without a single Democrat.

Meanwhile, Democrats have warned that the move will imperil abortion rights for women and the availability of health care for millions of Americans under the Affordable Care Act.

They have also decried a nomination so close to a national election, a move that Graham and other Republicans have said was wrong on principle in 2016 when it applied to former President Obama's selection Merrick Garland.

Supreme Court is shorthanded but could play key role in election

  Supreme Court is shorthanded but could play key role in election The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg adds a new layer of intrigue to a pandemic-infused election that's been challenged from Alabama to Wisconsin.On SCOTUS ‘all Democrats can do is plan retaliation’ expert says

The hearings will last three to four days, according to Graham, who faces a hotly contested race for his own South Carolina Senate seat.

Opening statements from the Judiciary Committee and Barrett are scheduled for Oct. 12, followed by questioning and testimony from "those who know Judge Barrett the best," according to Graham.


Video: Beschloss: Trump could push Supreme Court hard to the right (MSNBC)

Trump nominates Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. What happens next in Senate confirmation process .
Now that Trump has named Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court, the Senate can start its nomination process.How will President Trump's Supreme Court nomination impact Ohio voters?

usr: 1
This is interesting!