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Politics Two Republican women could be only GOP votes against Amy Coney Barrett

03:16  29 september  2020
03:16  29 september  2020 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

Republicans have said they want to confirm Amy Coney Barrett before Election Day. Here's how long other confirmations took

  Republicans have said they want to confirm Amy Coney Barrett before Election Day. Here's how long other confirmations took Now that Trump has nominated Amy Coney Barret to the Supreme Court, the issue becomes whether the GOP-led Senate can confirm her before Election Day. Amy Coney Barrett named President Trump's third Supreme Court nominee USA TODAY See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next Hear Amy Coney Barrett's tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg CNN Amy Coney Barrett speaks after Trump announces her nomination for Supreme Court CNBC Trump announces Amy Coney Barrett as Supreme Court nominee The Washington Post ‘A great Ameri

Amy Vivian Coney Barrett (born January 28, 1972) is an American lawyer, jurist, and academic who serves as a circuit judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.

GOP fights back against attacks on Amy Coney Barrett ’s adopted children. Liberals on social media are questioning whether two children adopted by President Trump’s expected Supreme Court nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett , were adopted legitimately — as Senate Republicans leaped to defend her.

Despite Senate Republicans uniting behind Judge Amy Coney Barrett as the next Supreme Court justice, the only two GOP senators who may vote against her confirmation will be two women.

a man wearing a suit and tie © Provided by Washington Examiner

Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski and Maine Sen. Susan Collins previously declared they would oppose any nomination by President Trump to fill the seat once occupied by the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg if the confirmation vote happened before the election. Murkowski has since indicated she would at least be willing to meet with Barrett.

Amy Coney Barrett pays homage to conservative mentor Antonin Scalia — 'His judicial philosophy is mine too'

  Amy Coney Barrett pays homage to conservative mentor Antonin Scalia — 'His judicial philosophy is mine too' Barrett, a former Notre Dame law professor, drew clear comparisons between her legal philosophy and Scalia's, saying "his judicial philosophy is mine too."Barrett paid homage to the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who led the conservative wing of the high court before his death in 2016, describing him as her mentor.

Amy Coney Barrett has made clear that she believes abortion is morally wrong. When she has ruled on abortion-related cases, she has ruled to restrict abortion access. She has made clear that she does not adhere to a basic ethos of gender equality, that men and women should have equal rights

Amy Coney Barrett , 48, currently serves as a judge on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals. A former clerk for Justice Antonin Scalia, Barrett takes a strict “originalist” view of the Constitution that prioritizes the original text over subsequent interpretations. Her nomination is President Trump’s third pick for the

“For weeks I have stated that I do not support taking up a potential Supreme Court vacancy this close to an election," Collins said in her statement after Barrett’s nomination was announced. "But today the President exercised his constitutional authority to nominate an individual to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court left by the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. I welcome the opportunity to meet with the Supreme Court nominee, just as I did in 2016.”

“In the interest of both fairness to the American people and consistency in following the practice established four years ago, there should not be a vote on a Supreme Court nominee prior to the election,” Collins continued. “As I stated even before Justice Ginsburg’s death, should a nominee for the Supreme Court be brought to the Senate floor before the election, I will vote no.”

Bio highlights of Amy Coney Barrett, Trump's high court pick

  Bio highlights of Amy Coney Barrett, Trump's high court pick WASHINGTON (AP) — Here’s a bio box on President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee. Amy Coney Barrett, age 48 - A judge on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals nominated by President Donald Trump in 2017 and considered once before by Trump for a high court seat; her three-year judicial record shows a clear and consistent conservative bent. - A graduate of the University of Notre Dame Law School and Rhodes College who has taught law at Notre Dame, worked for a Washington law firm and clerked for Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.- A devout Catholic mother of seven and Louisiana native born in 1972, she would be the youngest justice on the current court if confirmed.

Amy Coney Barrett 's nomination to the US Supreme Court comes as little surprise. And her vote , alongside a conservative majority, could make the difference for decades ahead, especially on divisive issues such as abortion rights and The couple have seven children, including two adopted from Haiti.

By nominating Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, President Donald Trump took the first step Saturday toward solidifying a 6-3 conservative majority on the high court, a shift that could usher in sweeping changes to health care, as well as abortion, voting and gun rights.

Supporters of Collins will argue that it is not about the nominee herself but about the process.

While neither senator's votes are necessary for Barrett’s confirmation, withholding support for a woman who could potentially be on the court for the rest of their lives could be a reputational gamble.

There are presently nine Republican female senators, compared to 17 female Democratic senators in the upper chamber. If Barrett is confirmed to the high court, she will be one of three female justices but the only one of the three nominated by a Republican president.

Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, appointed by President Ronald Reagan, was the first woman nominated to the Supreme Court. If confirmed, Barrett will be the second Republican nominee to sit on the court.

Murkowski voted against the confirmations of Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor, but Collins voted in favor of the confirmations for both justices, who were appointed by President Barack Obama.

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Amy Coney Barrett ’s Record. Women aren’t gym socks, purchased in bulk so that a replacement can be seamlessly substituted into the rotation when one goes missing in the washing machine. Republicans would have us believe that ramming through Justice Ginsburg’s replacement less than

Amy Coney Barrett has been on Donald Trump's shortlist for Supreme Court vacancies for some Who is Amy Coney Barrett ? After graduating from Notre Dame University Law School in Indiana, she Conservatives hope she will rule against the Affordable Care Act - a health insurance scheme

Nevertheless, Collins is in a difficult reelection campaign and spent a lot of political capital to support Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation. While voting against Barrett could hurt her with the base of the party in Maine, independents and centrists in her state support waiting to fill the seat until after the election.

Tags: News, Amy Coney Barrett, Susan Collins, Lisa Murkowski, Supreme Court, Nominations, Campaigns, 2020 Elections, Campaign 2020

Original Author: Kerry Picket

Original Location: Two Republican women could be only GOP votes against Amy Coney Barrett

Republicans push Barrett confirmation as Democrats criticize timing .
Trump nominated Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court on Saturday. Overwhelmingly, Republicans called Amy Coney Barrett a well-qualified candidate and pushed for a confirmation in the upcoming weeks. Democrats continued to criticize the timing, with some outright saying they wouldn't meet with the nominee.

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