•   
  •   
  •   

Politics 'I'm tired of it': Fox News reporter John Roberts loses temper over White House 'deflecting' on Trump's refusal to condemn white supremacist groups

23:00  01 october  2020
23:00  01 october  2020 Source:   businessinsider.com

Lawmakers push back against Trump's refusal to commit to peaceful transfer of power

  Lawmakers push back against Trump's refusal to commit to peaceful transfer of power Several Republicans reaffirmed a peaceful transition, though they did not call out Trump by name or directly reference his comments. © Provided by CNBC Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks during her weekly news conference in the Capitol in Washington on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. A day after President Donald Trump refused to promise a peaceful transfer of power if he loses the 2020 election, lawmakers pushed back on his statements. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

Melissa Francis holding a sign posing for the camera: Fox News reporter John Roberts excoriated the White House on Thursday for deflecting questions on President Trump's stance on white supremacist groups. YouTube © YouTube Fox News reporter John Roberts excoriated the White House on Thursday for deflecting questions on President Trump's stance on white supremacist groups. YouTube
  • Fox News' reporter John Roberts lost his temper on-air Thursday as he discussed the White House's efforts to dance around questions on President Donald Trump's stance on white supremacy.
  • "Stop deflecting. Stop blaming the media. I'm tired of it," Roberts said in an impassioned reaction to Thursday's press briefing.
  • Trump on Tuesday declined to explicitly condemn white supremacist groups during the presidential debate.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Fox News reporter John Roberts on Thursday was visibly frustrated with White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany's responses to questions on why President Donald Trump has not condemned white supremacist groups.

What to Watch on Tuesday: Weakest Link returns with Jane Lynch at the helm

  What to Watch on Tuesday: Weakest Link returns with Jane Lynch at the helm What to Watch on Tuesday: 'Weakest Link' returns, with Jane Lynch at the helm. Related content: Michelle Buteau is 'just exhausted' but as funny as ever in her new special Welcome to Buteaupia Michelle Buteau, one of the best comedy scene-stealers, on finally getting her own Netflix special TikTok's lip-syncing Trump impersonator Sarah Cooper lands Netflix comedy special Weakest Link Your browser does not support this video require(["binding"], function (binding) { binding("wcVideoPlayer", "#video_player_72478b16-e283-4c23-a07b-7d85043b35f4").

"Stop deflecting. Stop blaming the media. I'm tired of it," Roberts said in an impassioned reaction to Thursday's press briefing.

"The press secretary would not, in a definitive and unambiguous and non-deflecting way, say that the president condemns white supremacism in all its forms and any group that espouses it," Roberts told Fox host Melissa Francis.

He went on to cite the fact that a number of prominent Republicans in Congress have urged Trump to "correct" his recent statements on the matter.

"For all of you on Twitter who are hammering me for asking that question, I don't care! Because it's a question that needs to be asked and clearly the president's Republican colleagues a mile away from here are looking for an answer for it, too," Roberts said.

Trump's jarring white supremacist moment launches an online furor

  Trump's jarring white supremacist moment launches an online furor The president told the Proud Boys, a self-described "western chauvinist" group, to "stand back" and "stand down."Moderator Chris Wallace gave President Donald Trump an uninterrupted opportunity to condemn the nation's biggest domestic terrorist groups: white supremacists. Instead, Trump said they should “stand back and stand by.” What's more, he said, the violence in cities like Kenosha and Portland is a “left-wing problem, not a right-wing problem.

Roberts during the briefing asked McEnany for a declarative statement to whether the president denounces white supremacism and groups that espouse it.

McEnany in response falsely stated that Trump has "condemned white supremacy more than any other president in modern history." Trump's rhetoric and policy positions have frequently been celebrated by white supremacist and other far right groups, and he's been endorsed by white nationalists in the past.


Video: Reporters press McEnany over white supremacy (Reuters - US Video Online)

The White House press secretary went on to misleadingly say that Trump's "record on this is unmistakable and it's shameful the media refuses to cover it."

Later, McEnany took to Twitter to go after Roberts and note that his wife, reporter Kyra Phillips, in a tweet on Wednesday said that "Trump tells me he DENOUNCES white supremacists."

Anthony Scaramucci says first presidential debate was an 'embarrassment' to the U.S.

  Anthony Scaramucci says first presidential debate was an 'embarrassment' to the U.S. "I don't think anybody won," said Scaramucci, a hedge fund investor who briefly served as Trump's White House communications chief. © Provided by CNBC Anthony Scaramucci, founder and managing partner of Skybridge Capital, served briefly as White House communications director in 2017. SINGAPORE — The first debate between U.S.

But Roberts' questions on Thursday were linked to a well-documented history of Trump decrying white supremacy only after public pressure and in a feeble, belated manner. The president has repeatedly failed to forcefully condemn white supremacist groups and their ideology.

Trump on many occasions has made comments that directly align with the worldviews of white supremacist, such as declaring to a rally full of nearly all white supporters in Minnesota last month that they have "good genes" as he referenced the "racehorse theory."

It's true that there have been instances in which the president has disavowed white supremacist groups. But this has generally occurred after he received an endorsement from such groups or associated individuals, including the Ku Klux Klan, or after he ignited backlash via racist or xenophobic statements.

In one of the most infamous moments of his presidency, Trump blamed "many sides" for deadly violence at a neo-Nazi rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in August 2017. A counterprotester was killed during the white nationalist rally.

‘Trump was like a wild beast’

  ‘Trump was like a wild beast’ Even longtime political observers had never seen anything like Tuesday’s debate. Forget what it means for the election—what does it mean for our democracy? 19 of them weigh in.Politico Magazine has a tradition of using debate nights to bring quick, authoritative perspective on America’s big political moments, inviting a range of insiders to look past easy takes and offer their insights on what really shifted in the campaign.

Subsequently, former KKK leader David Duke celebrated Trump's remarks and thanked the president for condemning the "leftist terrorists."

After the outcry over his initial response to the alarming events in Charlottesville, Trump finally came forward and denounced white nationalist groups. But it took a significant amount of criticism, including from Republicans, to push Trump to that point.

Given this history, Trump during the presidential debate on Tuesday was asked by moderator Chris Wallace of Fox News to explicitly condemn white supremacist groups. Trump in response elevated a far-right extremist group with a record of disseminating white nationalist propaganda and a history of street violence.

"Proud Boys, stand back and stand by! But I'll tell you what, somebody's got to do something about antifa and the left," Trump said in response to Wallace.

On Wednesday, Trump backtracked and claimed he didn't know who the Proud Boys are, despite explicitly mentioning them during the debate. This is part of a broader pattern with Trump, who has leaned heavily on white supremacist ploys as he fights for reelection.

Read the original article on Business Insider

'Mailmen selling ballots. Dumped in rivers. Found in creeks': Trump makes unfounded claims about mail-in voting .
From claiming mailmen are "selling the ballots" to arguing that mail ballots are being "dumped in rivers," Trump ramped up his assault on mail-votingTrump now says he 'doesn't know' Proud Boys group

usr: 1
This is interesting!