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Politics Ted Cruz: Senate must confirm Amy Coney Barrett so it can "resolve any cases" involving the election

23:45  01 october  2020
23:45  01 october  2020 Source:   salon.com

Republicans have said they want to confirm Amy Coney Barrett before Election Day. Here's how long other confirmations took

  Republicans have said they want to confirm Amy Coney Barrett before Election Day. Here's how long other confirmations took Now that Trump has nominated Amy Coney Barret to the Supreme Court, the issue becomes whether the GOP-led Senate can confirm her before Election Day. Amy Coney Barrett named President Trump's third Supreme Court nominee USA TODAY See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next Hear Amy Coney Barrett's tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg CNN Amy Coney Barrett speaks after Trump announces her nomination for Supreme Court CNBC Trump announces Amy Coney Barrett as Supreme Court nominee The Washington Post ‘A great Ameri

Ted Cruz wearing a suit and tie © Provided by Salon Ted Cruz

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) Getty Images/ Jim Lo Scalzo-Pool

Senate confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Donald Trump's far-right Supreme Court nominee, are scheduled to begin on Monday, Oct. 12 — and prominent GOP senators like Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Sen. Lindsey Graham (chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee) are making it abundantly clear that they expect to see Barrett's confirmation rammed through the Senate as soon as possible. Two of the main reasons why Republicans are so anxious to see Barrett confirmed are Roe v. Wade and Obamacare. But Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas is stressing that there is another reason to move quickly with her confirmation: Barrett could be a key vote on election disputes.

Amy Coney Barrett pays homage to conservative mentor Antonin Scalia — 'His judicial philosophy is mine too'

  Amy Coney Barrett pays homage to conservative mentor Antonin Scalia — 'His judicial philosophy is mine too' Barrett, a former Notre Dame law professor, drew clear comparisons between her legal philosophy and Scalia's, saying "his judicial philosophy is mine too."Barrett paid homage to the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who led the conservative wing of the high court before his death in 2016, describing him as her mentor.

"The entire reason the Senate should act and should act promptly to confirm a ninth justice is so that the Supreme Court can resolve any cases that arise in the wake of the election," Cruz told reporters.

Translation: If the 2020 presidential election is really close in key swing states such as Pennsylvania, Florida, North Carolina and Arizona and there any disputes with the vote count, Cruz would like to make sure that Barrett is on the Supreme Court so that she could rule on the case.

Prominent Democrats, however, are saying that if Barrett is confirmed and the Supreme Court does end up ruling on any election disputes, Trump's nominee needs to recuse herself — and that not doing so would be unethical.

During an appearance on NBC News' "Meet the Press" on Sunday, Sept. 27, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker — a Democratic member of the Senate Judiciary Committee — said of Barrett, "If she does not recuse herself, I fear that the Court will be further delegitimized."

Bio highlights of Amy Coney Barrett, Trump's high court pick

  Bio highlights of Amy Coney Barrett, Trump's high court pick WASHINGTON (AP) — Here’s a bio box on President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee. Amy Coney Barrett, age 48 - A judge on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals nominated by President Donald Trump in 2017 and considered once before by Trump for a high court seat; her three-year judicial record shows a clear and consistent conservative bent. - A graduate of the University of Notre Dame Law School and Rhodes College who has taught law at Notre Dame, worked for a Washington law firm and clerked for Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.- A devout Catholic mother of seven and Louisiana native born in 1972, she would be the youngest justice on the current court if confirmed.

Booker is among the Senate Democrats who has said that he is open to the possibility of expanding or "packing" the high court with additional seats if Barrett's nomination is rammed through before Election Day, which is Tuesday, Nov. 3. Under the U.S. Constitution, the Supreme Court does not have to have nine justices — and Congress would have the power to vote to expand the number of justices to ten, 11, 12 or more. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt hoped to expand the number of Supreme Court justices during the 1930s but was unsuccessful and encountered opposition from members of Congress.

Sen. Chris Coons of Delaware told National Public Radio that if Barrett is confirmed so close to a presidential election, she "should recuse herself" from voting on any election-related matters.

Cruz, however, doesn't see it that way. And Trump himself is making it clear that he believes Barrett should vote on election-related matters if she is confirmed by the Senate.

"I think this (election) will end up in the Supreme Court," Trump said this week, "and I think it's very important that we have nine justices."

Trump Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett meets with McConnell, top Republican senators .
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usr: 1
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