•   
  •   
  •   

Politics Ruth Bader Ginsburg Lost Her Battle to Save Voting Rights. Here's How We Can Take Up the Fight and Honor Her Legacy

14:50  07 october  2020
14:50  07 october  2020 Source:   time.com

GOP sells 'Notorious A.C.B.' T-shirts moments after nomination, one day after RBG honored in Capitol

  GOP sells 'Notorious A.C.B.' T-shirts moments after nomination, one day after RBG honored in Capitol Moments after the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett, the NRSC began selling "Notorious A.C.B." T-shirts, playing on Justice Ginsburg's nickname.Fareed: This is how Republicans keep their power

Here ' s How We Can Take Up the Fight and Honor Her Legacy . The Voting Rights Act was enacted to ensure no citizen would be denied the right to vote because of race or color. It created a “coverage formula” that applied to states and political subdivisions with a history of significant

The death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg has injected a new element of volatility into the presidential race, with questions about what it will mean for the already intense President Trump, who polling suggests has been steadily losing support among college-educated women ever since he was elected, has

a group of people holding a sign: Activists distribute pro-voting rights placards outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 27, 2013, as the Court prepares to hear Shelby County vs Holder. © Mandel Ngan—AFP/Getty Images Activists distribute pro-voting rights placards outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 27, 2013, as the Court prepares to hear Shelby County vs Holder.

Justice Ginsburg’s dissents were often even more powerful than her voice when she was in the majority. She described them as “appealing to the intelligence of a future day.” She never stopped believing in that better future or that the law provided a vehicle for moving the country forward.

Fact check: Ginsburg cared for her young child, sick husband while excelling in law school

  Fact check: Ginsburg cared for her young child, sick husband while excelling in law school A viral meme correctly describes how Ruth Bader Ginsburg cared for her young daughter and sick husband while excelling in law school.Why Trump’s taxes don’t prove he is a ‘smart businessman’ as his defenders say

“ Ruth Bader Ginsburg grew up in Brooklyn in a lower middle-class family. When she was in high Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg , the Supreme Court’ s feminist icon, not only changed the law, she Unless they could attract a fifth vote , which Justice Anthony M. Kennedy provided on increasingly rare

He added, " Ruth Bader Ginsburg fought to the end, through her cancer, with unwavering faith in our That' s how we remember her. But she also left instructions for how she wanted her legacy to be honored . Ginsburg takes the Supreme Court oath from Chief Justice William Rehnquist, right , in

This was never truer than when she found herself in the minority in the voting rights case, Shelby County v. Holder, joined by Justices Breyer, Sotomayor and Kagan. The majority opinion rolled back the 1965 Voting Rights Act’s protections and permitted states, including those with histories of racially motivated voter suppression, to change their voting procedures without any outside oversight. Justice Ginsburg knew what that meant and refused to pretend it wouldn’t erode the advances made under the act.

The case’s legal underpinnings are somewhat complicated but worth tracing. Shelby County, Ala., just south of Birmingham, sued then-Attorney General Eric Holder in federal court in the District of Columbia in April 2010, arguing parts of the Voting Rights Act were unconstitutional. The district judge disagreed, ruling that the act would stay in force. The Court of Appeals affirmed.

A more conservative Supreme Court could bring drastic changes for LGBTQ+ Americans

  A more conservative Supreme Court could bring drastic changes for LGBTQ+ Americans Across the nation, queer people are debating fast-tracking major life changes, expecting that rights they now have could be stripped away. Trans and nonbinary people report trying to quickly access gender-confirming medical care out of fear that the Affordable Care Act will be struck down, and their insurance companies will stop covering transgender surgeries and hormones. There is a rush to put through legal name changes. Erin Taylor, 24, and her girlfriend never talked about getting married before. The couple has been together for a year. “I don’t want to super speed up the process,” said Taylor.

US judge and feminist icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg is lying in repose at the top court where she served. " Ruth wanted to be an opera virtuoso but became a rock star instead," he said during the private ceremony, noting her battles against gender discrimination throughout her career.

Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg . Photographer: Todd Heisler/The New York Times via The nine justices will also rule on an issue that goes to the core of her legacy — the workplace Ginsburg ’ s 1993 appointment by President Bill Clinton made her the court’ s second female justice

The Voting Rights Act was enacted to ensure no citizen would be denied the right to vote because of race or color. It created a “coverage formula” that applied to states and political subdivisions with a history of significant discrimination against Black voters in the 1960s and 1970s. This discrimination included impossible literacy tests, administered only to Black people and poor white people and devices like Mississippi’s notorious soap-bubble test, which required Black voters to correctly guess the number of bubbles in a bar of soap in order to vote. The act prohibited the old discriminatory tests and devices and required those jurisdictions to submit any new changes in their voting procedures—closing or moving polling places, requirements for more and more limited forms of identification, reduction in early voting days, purges to voter rolls—to either the Justice Department or the district court in the District of Columbia for approval before they enacted them, a process called preclearance.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Former Clerks Remember a Demanding But Playful Boss — Who Encouraged Romance!

  Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Former Clerks Remember a Demanding But Playful Boss — Who Encouraged Romance! Ruth Bader Ginsburg is also remembered for her devotion to justice, her love of family, and her impact on the lives of millions in this week's issue of PEOPLE"I don't know how she found out, she buzzed me on the intercom one day and said with sort of a twinkle in her voice, 'I didn't know you had a special friend here at the court, you must have her up for tea,' " Berman, a clerk from 1997 to 1998,  tells PEOPLE in this week's issue.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has passed away at the age of 87. Here are some of our favorite quotes from the Notorious RBG. 1. On her mother. "I’m dejected, but only momentarily, when I can’t get the fifth vote for something I think is very important.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed away on Friday, September 18, leaving behind a legacy where she played an integral role in a number Here are just eight of the most critical cases she has participated in. Ginsburg ’ s dissenting opinion made it clear that she disagreed with the court’ s favoring of Bush.

When the act was passed in 1965, the covered jurisdictions included the states of Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Virginia. Thirty-nine counties in North Carolina and one in Arizona fell within it. Additional jurisdictions were added to the act in subsequent years, for instance in 1975 when Congress added coverage in some jurisdictions that only offered ballots in English.

In finding the act unconstitutional and ending the preclearance requirement for the covered states and counties, Chief Justice Roberts held that the “blight of racial discrimination in voting” that had “infected the electoral process in parts of our country for nearly a century,” and which the act was designed to address, had been ameliorated by 2013.

On the same day in February 2013 that lawyers for Shelby County appeared before the Supreme Court and argued that discrimination in voting was a thing of the past and that intentional discrimination had disappeared, a friend of mine had business in the Shelby County Courthouse. He had forgotten he had an old coin in his pocket that he’d shown to a friend and had to take it out as he went through security. The courthouse security guard, a white man, looked at the coin and told him, “That’s a Dixon. That’s where the name Dixie comes from.” “But,” the guard told him dismissively, “Black people will tell you it’s just about cotton.” Then, in a moment that surprised my friend enough that he shared the story with me the day the Shelby County case was decided, the guard told him that since it was Black History Month, if he wanted to see Black history, he’d take him over to the county jail, where he could see it, all lined up. The guard’s opinion was shocking. Even worse was the fact that a county employee charged with protecting the public felt comfortable sharing it with a stranger, as though every white person in the courthouse in Shelby County would share his views.

Trump on Supreme Court vacancy: 'When you have the votes, you can sort of do what you want'

  Trump on Supreme Court vacancy: 'When you have the votes, you can sort of do what you want' President Trump on Monday defended the Republican plan to bring his pick to replace the Supreme Court vacancy left by Ruth Bader Ginsburg to a vote so close to an election despite the fact that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell declined to do the same with Merrick Garland, President Barack Obama's nominee, in 2016. “When you have the Senate, when you have the votes, you can sort of do what you want as long as you have it,” Trump said in an interview with “Fox & Friends.”When Obama nominated Garland after the death of Justice Antonin Scalia in February 2016, Republicans controlled both the House and the Senate.

Here , Ginsburg is holding a photograph of Hillary Clinton singing "the toothbrush song" with Ginsburg ' s Photos: Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg . This informal group photo was taken of the US Supreme The 19th Amendment guaranteed women the right to vote . Hide Caption.

Mourners reflected on her legacy and described their fears for the future of the court. Ginsburg died on Friday of metastatic pancreatic cancer at her home in Washington, DC, surrounded by her family, the court has said. She was a prominent icon of women' s rights and became a figurehead for liberals in

Shelby County had filed its lawsuit after one of its small cities, Calera, created a new voting plan without submitting it for preclearance that resulted in its only Black council member losing his seat. After the city was forced to redo its plan in compliance with the act, a new election was held and the council member regained his seat. Alabama also had a law that prohibited people who had been convicted of a felony from voting, which disparately affected Black people. But Chief Justice Roberts accepted Shelby County’s characterization, writing in his opinion, “There is no denying, however, that the conditions that originally justified these measures no longer characterize voting in the covered jurisdictions … Nearly 50 years later, things have changed dramatically.” Suggesting that the Voting Rights Act was no longer necessary because it had succeeded didn’t reflect the reality in many covered jurisdictions.

Justice Ginsburg understood that the act was a levee keeping a whole press of problems at bay. Even though she couldn’t, as a justice in the minority, prevent the evisceration of the Voting Rights Act, she devised an analogy of such power that anyone who heard it understood why it was so important to keep the act in place. “Throwing out preclearance when it has worked and is continuing to work to stop discriminatory changes is like throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet,” she wrote.

Meghan Markle pays tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg with her outfit

  Meghan Markle pays tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg with her outfit Meghan Markle, 39, who is currently living in Santa Barbara, paid tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg by wearing a t-shirt and mask honouring the feminist icon during a podcast recording this week. The Duke, 36, and Duchess of Sussex, 39, appeared on the Teenager Therapy podcast yesterday in which they discussed the stigma surrounding mental health  and 'how we can all contribute to a healthier world: physically, mentally, emotionally and holistically'.

There was no gainsaying her logic or her prescience. Alabama implemented the voter identification act it had passed two years earlier but declined to submit for preclearance as soon as the Supreme Court decided Shelby County. Texas put in place an even stricter identification act the same day the case was decided, one that would impact predominately poor and minority voters. North Carolina followed suit and also cut back on early voting. Mississippi rolled out its own identification act, one it had submitted but not received preclearance to use. And, in the wake of Shelby County, the Court gave permission to purge voter rolls and gerrymander districts. The future Justice Ginsburg hoped to evoke in her dissents, where protection for everyone’s voting rights would be the law of the land, looked even more distant as House Republicans presented nearly unanimous opposition to HR 4, a new voting rights act that passed the House in 2019, and the Senate refused to hold a floor vote on the bill.

The Voting Rights Act was originally passed for only five years, but it was renewed with strong bipartisan majorities and during Republican administrations in 1970 (Nixon), 1975 (Ford), 1982 (Reagan) and 2006 (Bush). On each occasion, Congress recognized that while selecting a candidate to vote for is a political choice, the act of voting itself is fundamentally American, a quintessential right that must be protected for all citizens. Justice Ginsburg took the majority to task for failing to honor that tradition, when she announced her opinion in Shelby County, quoting from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., but adding her own emphasis, “The arc of the moral universe is long…but it bends toward justice if there is a steadfast commitment to see the task through to completion.”

How we got here: The battle over Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court, recapped

  How we got here: The battle over Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court, recapped Supreme Court confirmation hearings are set to begin Monday for President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett as the fight to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg's seat on the Supreme Court moves into its final phase. © Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett and President Donald Trump on Sept.26, 2020, in the Rose Garden of the White House. Though Republicans are speeding the process along, Barrett's confirmation will still take time. They plan to hold four days of confirmation hearings and to fill the seat by Election Day.

Chief Justice Roberts’ assessment in 2013, that the days of discrimination in voting were behind us, has been conclusively disproven by subsequent events, but his words are still the law of the land. We face serious challenges in voting ranging from foreign interference to suppression to gerrymandering to delayed results due to mail-in voting because of the pandemic. Those problems may seem overwhelming. But the woman who saw them and the future, if the Voting Rights Act was gutted, with such clear foresight would not have given up. She would have persisted, like she did when she took on inequity against women in the early part of her career. There are important jobs for each of us. We can register and vote early to take pressure off the polls during the pandemic. Healthy, low-risk people can volunteer as poll workers or watchers. The measure of how much each vote matters is that there are people who try to prevent some of us from casting ballots. We need a steadfast commitment to guaranteeing the right to vote for all Americans, no matter who they vote for. And a new voting rights act would honor Justice Ginsburg’s legacy. She would want us to keep the umbrella open.

Barrett cites 'Ginsburg rule' that Ginsburg didn't follow .
WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett invoked Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at her Senate confirmation hearing Tuesday in refusing to discuss her view of gay rights and the Constitution. “Justice Ginsburg with her characteristic pithiness used this to describe how a nominee should comport herself at a hearing. No hints, no previews, no forecasts. That had been the practice of nominees before her. But everybody calls it the Ginsburg rule because she stated it so concisely,” Barrett said of the woman whose seat she would take if confirmed.

usr: 3
This is interesting!