•   
  •   
  •   

Politics Mike Pence tried to blame Kamala Harris for undermining a Covid-19 vaccine. But the public blames Trump.

18:11  08 october  2020
18:11  08 october  2020 Source:   vox.com

'You have the power': Kamala Harris urges voters to oppose Trump, Senate GOP over Supreme Court nominee

  'You have the power': Kamala Harris urges voters to oppose Trump, Senate GOP over Supreme Court nominee Sen. Kamala Harris, the Democratic vice presidential nominee, urged voters to oppose President Trump and GOP senators over their Supreme Court nominee.Harris blasts Barrett over Roe

At the vice presidential debate on Wednesday, Vice President Mike Pence accused Sen. Kamala Harris of undermining public trust in a Covid-19 vaccine. But the American public actually blames President Donald Trump for politicizing the issue, according to numerous polls.

Mike Pence wearing a suit and tie: Vice President Mike Pence blamed Sen. Kamala Harris at their debate for public distrust in a vaccine. But polls show voters actually don’t trust Donald Trump. © Morry Gash-Pool/Getty Images Vice President Mike Pence blamed Sen. Kamala Harris at their debate for public distrust in a vaccine. But polls show voters actually don’t trust Donald Trump.

Moderator Susan Page asked Harris during the debate whether she would take a vaccine if one were to be approved by the Trump administration.

'He loves his rallies:' Biden says Trump puts supporters at risk with big events while keeping himself safe

  'He loves his rallies:' Biden says Trump puts supporters at risk with big events while keeping himself safe "Oh, he loves his rallies. And the next time he holds one, look closely. Trump keeps his distance from anyone at a rally," Biden said in Wisconsin.Highlighting recent claims from a former White House pandemic adviser who alleged that Trump disparaged his followers, Biden accused the president of not caring about the working-class voters who form the foundation of his support.

“If Dr. [Anthony] Fauci, if the doctors tell us that we should take it, I’ll be the first in line to take it. Absolutely,” Harris said. “But if Donald Trump tells us to take it, I’m not taking it.”

Harris’s answer reflects the fact that most Americans don’t believe what the president says about a vaccine.

Pence, encapsulating the president’s position, responded to the senator by saying, “The fact that you continue to undermine public confidence in a vaccine, if the vaccine emerges during the Trump administration is unconscionable. Stop playing politics with people’s lives.”

He also touted the progress that has been made on a vaccine so far: “The reality is, we’re going to have a vaccine in record time, in less than a year. Unheard-of time. We have five companies in Phase 3 clinical trials, and we’re producing tens of millions of doses.”

Mike Pence: What you need to know about the Republican nominee for vice president

  Mike Pence: What you need to know about the Republican nominee for vice president Everything you need to know about Vice President Mike Pence, Donald Trump's vice president on the Republican ticket. The pair did not personally know one another prior to their 2016 race, but their first term has strengthened their bond. Pence has been steadfast in his support for the president through controversy, whether it was a ban on travel into the U.S. from predominantly Muslim countries, Trump's impeachment by the House of Representatives and trial in the Senate, or the decision to resume large, in-person campaign events amid coronavirus.

That part was mostly true. The rapid progress on a Covid-19 vaccine reflects some good fortune (coronaviruses are very familiar to modern science) as well as a sizable investment made by the federal government. The Trump administration has already spent $10 billion through Operation Warp Speed, paying for clinical research and also for pharmaceutical companies to pre-manufacture doses of their vaccine candidates so that, if the vaccine should win FDA approval, they can start distributing it as quickly as possible. The current record for vaccine development is four years, for mumps.

Experts give credit to the Trump administration for that progress, though they consider “Operation Warp Speed” to be a branding exercise for work that would have been done regardless. But there is one big problem with the project, according to the experts and insiders I’ve spoken with: Trump himself, in undercutting what is supposed to be a sacrosanct FDA approval process.

LIVE: Coronavirus front and center as Pence, Harris square off in only vice presidential debate

  LIVE: Coronavirus front and center as Pence, Harris square off in only vice presidential debate Kamala Harris and Mike Pence will hold the only vice presidential debate, which comes as Trump and White House battle an outbreak of COVID.Pence and Harris will meet Wednesday for their only debate. The 90-minute event begins at 9 p.m. ET and won’t be hard to find: It’ll be broadcast on every major network. Viewers streaming on USATODAY.com will have the added benefit of real-time fact-checking and political context.

How Donald Trump has undermined the public’s faith in a Covid-19 vaccine

Rather than let science run its course, irrespective of his own electoral considerations, Trump has consistently meddled. He’s been promoting unrealistic vaccination timelines for months. He is reportedly calling drug company CEOs to pressure them to make progress on the vaccine front.

The New York Times reported this week that the White House had initially blocked the FDA from releasing more stringent criteria for approving the emergency use of a Covid-19 vaccine. After the FDA did finally release those guidelines, Trump accused his own agency of being part of a political conspiracy against him.

At Wednesday’s debate, Pence couldn’t or wouldn’t acknowledge his boss’s mistakes. So he blamed Harris and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden for weakening public trust in a Covid-19 vaccine.

Four takeaways from a weirdly normal vice-presidential debate between Mike Pence and Kamala Harris

  Four takeaways from a weirdly normal vice-presidential debate between Mike Pence and Kamala Harris One week after President Trump’s aggressive interruptions of former Vice President Joe Biden turned the first presidential debate of 2020 into one of the most juvenile spectacles in campaign history, Wednesday’s face-off between Sen. Kamala Harris and Vice President Mike Pence felt, with the exception of a brief cameo by an uninvited insect, downright normal in comparison. Trump’s reluctance to condemn white supremacists during the first presidential debate? Nothing but more evidence of how “the media” chooses to “selectively edit” a president who actually “respects and cherishes all of the American people.” Trump seemed happy with Pence’s performance.

“We will have a vaccine, we believe, before the end of this year,” Pence said. “And it will have the capacity to save countless American lives. Your continued undermining of confidence in a vaccine is unacceptable.”

Pence’s timeline, like Trump’s, is very optimistic. New government guidance released this week makes clear the first data on the effectiveness of the Covid-19 vaccines being studied won’t be released until November or December at the very earliest. Pfizer’s CEO, overseeing one of the most promising candidates, has pushed back against any artificial timelines for vaccine approval. Moderna, another top candidate, was forced to slow down its clinical trials after failing to enroll enough minorities. Johnson & Johnson has said it expects to seek approval in early 2021. Most experts think a Covid-19 vaccine won’t be widely available until late spring or summer 2021, at the soonest.

And on public trust in the vaccine, Pence was outright misleading the audience.

The public doesn’t trust Trump on a vaccine. More than half of Americans, 52 percent, said in a September NBC News poll that they didn’t believe the president’s vaccine comments, while just 26 percent did. A STAT/Harris poll from late August found that 78 percent of Americans worry the vaccine approval process is being driven more by politics than science. And, in an echo of Harris’s stated concerns about a vaccine, only 19 percent of Americans said they would take a vaccine just because Trump said it was safe, according to a new Axios/Ipsos survey.

Kayla Mueller, ISIS hostage killed in Syria, becomes a focus of Pence-Harris debate

  Kayla Mueller, ISIS hostage killed in Syria, becomes a focus of Pence-Harris debate Mike Pence claimed Barack Obama and Joe Biden missed a chance to save hostage Kayla Mueller, whose parents have become Trump supporters.Vice President Mike Pence, during a debate with Democratic nominee Sen. Kamala Harris, invoked the story of Mueller, who was tortured and raped while being held hostage by ISIS during the years of President Barack Obama's administration.

Pence’s argument that it is Democrats who are eroding the public’s faith in a vaccine falls apart when you look at the polling that shows Americans of every political identification — including Republicans, a group less likely to be swayed by whatever Biden or Harris might say — are becoming less likely to say they’ll take a Covid-19 vaccine.

chart, bar chart © Pew Research Center

ABC News and Ipsos conducted a survey on whether the public trusts either of the two presidential candidates on a vaccine. They found that 41 percent said they had a great deal or a good amount of confidence in Biden; just 27 percent said the same of Trump.

America has a problem if this many people are skeptical of a Covid-19 vaccine. The fewer people who get vaccinated, the longer it will take to build up widespread immunity and eventually stamp out the coronavirus. But the source of those doubts isn’t Kamala Harris or Joe Biden. It is, if you take all of these public opinion surveys together, quite clearly Donald Trump.

Will you help keep Vox free for all?

The United States is in the middle of one of the most consequential presidential elections of our lifetimes. It’s essential that all Americans are able to access clear, concise information on what the outcome of the election could mean for their lives, and the lives of their families and communities. That is our mission at Vox. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone understand this presidential election: Contribute today from as little as $3.

Fact check: Post misrepresents Biden-Harris event turnout in at Phoenix museum .
A post on social media claiming a Biden-Harris event at a museum had no turnout ignores the fact it wasn't intended to be a campaign rally.“Embarrassing: Biden-Harris Held Arizona Rally, According to Media, No One Showed,” the Facebook post’s text reads, overlaid on a picture of the two Democratic candidates along with several laughing emoji.

usr: 0
This is interesting!