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Politics Trump urges Republicans to skip Supreme Court nomination hearings and work towards approving a stimulus package instead

19:25  12 october  2020
19:25  12 october  2020 Source:   businessinsider.com

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Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images © Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images
  • President Donald Trump urged Republicans to skip the Supreme Court nomination hearings and approve his nominee quickly so they could also pass a stimulus package.
  • "Personally, I would pull back, approve, and go for STIMULUS for the people!!" he said in a tweet.
  • Trump's comments come after the White House made a $1.8 trillion stimulus offer to Democrats, but both parties panned it.
  • Some Senate Republicans are reluctant to back additional relief spending that could grow the national debt, and odds are very slim that Congress will approve a stimulus package before the election.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump called on Republicans to skip the four-day Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett and approve his nominee quickly — so they could work on approving a stimulus package instead.

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"The Republicans are giving the Democrats a great deal of time, which is not mandated, to make their self serving statements relative to our great new future Supreme Court Justice," he wrote on Twitter.

"Personally, I would pull back, approve, and go for STIMULUS for the people!!" he said.

The Senate Judiciary Committee started the confirmation hearings on Monday for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, Trump's nominee for the high court. If confirmed towards the end of October, Barrett would lock in a 6-3 conservative majority on the Supreme Court.


Video: Problem Solvers Caucus leaders push for coronavirus stimulus deal (FOX News)

Read more: A $2.5 billion investment chief highlights the stock-market sectors poised to benefit the most if stimulus is passed after the election — and says Trump ending negotiations doesn't threaten the economic recovery

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  Lawmakers have been discussing second $1,200 stimulus checks for 5 months. Why those payments are still uncertain The coronavirus pandemic has hit Americans' wallets hard. Many are hoping for more financial relief from the federal government, namely second $1,200 stimulus checks. While lawmakers on both sides of the aisle agree on those payments, they're still clouded by uncertainty.Whether that happens or not depends on Congress.

Democrats have been critical of the proceedings because of the rapid timetable, and they've also argued it's coming at the expense of a federal rescue package. Sen. Patrick Leahy of Vermont said in his opening remarks "we shouldn't spending time on this when we are doing absolutely nothing to pass a much-needed Covid bill."

Trump's remarks come after the White House increased its stimulus offer to $1.8 trillion on Friday, its largest one yet during a turbulent stretch of negotiations with Democrats. The president revived the talks after abruptly ending them last week.

But Senate Republicans and Democrats blasted the White House proposal. Republicans said the price tag was too costly and criticized several measures. Meanwhile, Speaker Nancy Pelosi called it "wholly insufficient" in a letter to colleagues on Sunday, laying out concerns about health funding and testing.

Barrett back on Capitol Hill for senators' final questions

  Barrett back on Capitol Hill for senators' final questions WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett returns to Capitol Hill for a third day of confirmation hearings as senators dig deeper into the conservative judge's outlook on abortion, health care and a potentially disputed presidential election — the Democrats running out of time to stop Republicans pushing her quick confirmation. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Wednesday's session is set to be Barrett's last before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

She's also taken issue with the administration's plan on federal funding for state and local aid, unemployment insurance, and tax credits for families and low-income individuals.

The legislative window for action on a coronavirus relief bill is quickly closing with three weeks to go until Election Day. Negotiations for an economic aid package have been mostly between Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin with no input from Senate Republicans, some of whom are critical of supporting relief spending that grows the national debt.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was cool to the odds of passing an aid package that would pump hundreds of billions of dollars into the economy and aid jobless Americans and businesses in the short-term. He said on Thursday it was unlikely to happen before the election.

Read more: BlackRock's investment chief breaks down why Congress passing a second round of fiscal stimulus is 'quite serious' for markets and the economy — and pinpoints which sectors will benefit in either scenario

Read the original article on Business Insider

Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court hearings lacked the drama that Brett Kavanaugh's proceedings had. Here's why. .
Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court confirmation hearings lacked the drama of Brett Kavanaugh's proceedings. Here's why.Democrats warned of the precedent set if Republicans rushed through a nominee in the middle of a pandemic and presidential election, arguing no nominee should be considered until after voters cast ballots. They rattled off threats to slow the process, teasing a host of tools that could bog down the hearings, with some lawmakers even publicly suggesting launching impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump.

usr: 1
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