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Politics Senators to grill Amy Coney Barrett on third day of Supreme Court confirmation hearings

13:45  14 october  2020
13:45  14 october  2020 Source:   usatoday.com

Amy Barrett's law review articles show how Supreme Court rulings like Roe v. Wade could be challenged

  Amy Barrett's law review articles show how Supreme Court rulings like Roe v. Wade could be challenged Amy Coney Barrett's potential to overturn Roe v. Wade is expected to be a flashpoint in her Senate confirmation hearings, set to start Monday.However, Barrett has written law review articles that outline arguments attorneys theoretically could use in trying to strike down that ruling and other precedents, though the writings are analyses that don't urge specific action or say how she would decide specific cases. Among them: She cited legal experts who do not count Roe v. Wade among so-called "super precedents" — Supreme Court decisions that are so ingrained in American life that they can't be overturned.

Democrats grilled U.S. Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett about abortion rights, health-care law, guns and election disputes but ended a marathon day of testimony having made little progress derailing her likely Senate confirmation and a strengthened conservative majority on the

Amy Coney Barrett continues questioning in supreme court hearing – watch live. Second day of Amy Coney Barrett nomination hearing concludes. The day was characterized by Barrett Mazie Hirono, the Democratic senator of Hawaii, referred back to Amy Coney Barrett ’s use of the term

WASHINGTON – Senators on Wednesday will get to grill Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett again on her career and views that could offer insights on how she would rule on the nation's highest court.

Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee will get another chance to question Barrett on her views on the law and a number of hot-button issues that could come before the court.

On Tuesday, Barrett fielded questions from senators for more than 11 hours, where she attempted to differentiate her legal views from her personal beliefs and largely escaped any controversial confrontations with Democrats eager to block her nomination.

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett strives to show independence from White House, Republicans

  Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett strives to show independence from White House, Republicans The confirmation hearing is wedged closely between Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death and an election in which Republicans could lose power.In a marathon session before the Senate Judiciary Committee just three weeks from Election Day, Barrett was put on the defensive by Democrats charging that she was picked because of her views on abortion, gun rights, same-sex marriage and particularly the health care law headed to the high court for the third time next month.

Confirmation hearings for US Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett are set to begin as a divided Senate charges ahead on President Donald Trump’s pick to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and cement a conservative court majority before Election Day .

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett will cast herself as a jurist committed to avoiding policy making and keeping her personal views out of The top Democrat in the Senate, Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, on Sunday called on Barrett to commit to recusing herself from that case as well as

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Barrett repeatedly refrained from offering her stance on key issues and cases, such those that could decide the fate of abortion, healthcare and gun laws.

Throughout the lengthy hearing, the 48-year-old federal appeals court judge and law school professor from Indiana sought to define herself as someone who puts personal views aside and addresses legal issues with an open mind.

Fact check: Image showing fly on Amy Coney Barrett’s shoulder during hearing posted as a joke

  Fact check: Image showing fly on Amy Coney Barrett’s shoulder during hearing posted as a joke A viral image of a fly on Amy Coney Barrett's shoulder during her Senate hearing is satirical. The poster and video footage confirm there was no fly.A viral image appears to show a fly on Barrett’s shoulder as she sat during the first day of her Senate hearings. A timestamp in the top left corner of the images reveals that it was taken at 2:08 p.m. ET on Capitol Hill.

Republican and Democratic senators clashed over confirming Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court , with Republicans citing what Mr. Graham was fundraising off the Barrett confirmation fight on Fox News this morning, after Mr. Harrison announced a record-shattering million third -quarter

Media caption Amy Coney Barrett : "I will meet the challenge with both humility and courage". US President Donald Trump has nominated Amy Coney Barrett , a favourite of social conservatives, to be the new Supreme Court justice. Speaking by her side at the White House Rose Garden, Mr Trump

"I'm committed to the rule of law and the role of the Supreme Court and dispensing equal justice for all," she said during Tuesday' hearing.

Democrats repeatedly highlighted the history of remarks and opinions she's offered over her career that liberals argue endanger the future of a woman's right to abortions and the Affordable Care Act, which provides healthcare for millions of Americans.

A recap of Tuesday: Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett strives to show independence from White House, Republicans

How it works: How Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation process will unfold

“If I’m confirmed, you would not be getting Justice Scalia, you would be getting Justice Barrett," she said in reference to her more outspoken mentor, the late Associate Justice Antonin Scalia.

Trump-Biden town halls, Amy Coney Barrett hearings, Medicare open enrollment begins: 5 things to know Thursday

  Trump-Biden town halls, Amy Coney Barrett hearings, Medicare open enrollment begins: 5 things to know Thursday NBC and ABC host dueling town halls with Trump and Biden, final day of hearings in Amy Coney Barrett's nomination and more things to know Thursday.Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

As Judge Amy Coney Barrett was grilled before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, observers noted she President Trump’s conservative nominee relied on her memory alone for the lengthy questioning process during the second day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing .

Amy Coney Barrett refuses to give views on abortion and healthcare at her confirmation hearing . Republicans want the confirmation ahead of the presidential election on 3 November. On her first day of direct questioning from senators , Amy Coney Barrett has been meticulously sticking to this

She repeatedly stated under oath that she'd offered "no commitment to anyone, not in the Senate, not over at the White House, about how I would decide any case."

On Wednesday, each senator will be given at least 20 minutes to pepper Barrett with questions. The following day, on Thursday, is scheduled to mark the end of Barrett's public vetting, when senators are scheduled to hear from additional witnesses who know Barrett.

a close up of a woman: Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett speaks during a confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington. © AP Photo/Susan Walsh, Pool Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett speaks during a confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Republicans are eager to confirm Barrett to the Court before Election Day and have sped along the confirmation process. A final vote by the full Senate is expected before the end of the month.

The Senate Judiciary Committee will not vote on Barrett's confirmation this week but rather will hold it for one week, a common practice by the panel, before an expected vote around Oct. 22. Barrett's nomination is likely to split along party lines, 12 Republicans and 10 Democrats, before the full Senate takes up her nomination.

Amy Coney Barrett hearings conclude: Here's what happens next in Supreme Court confirmation

  Amy Coney Barrett hearings conclude: Here's what happens next in Supreme Court confirmation Here’s what to expect and when she could officially be sworn in as the ninth justice on the Supreme Court. More: Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court hearings conclude, paving way for confirmation days before election More: How we got here: The battle over Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court, recapped Committee vote Oct. 22 The Senate Judiciary Committee – the same 22-senator panel that spent the week questioning Barrett – will vote on Oct. 22 at 1 p.m. EDT on Barrett’s nomination.

President Donald Trump intends to choose Amy Coney Barrett to be the new Supreme Court justice, according to multiple senior Republican sources with knowledge of the process.

US Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett has said she is "honoured and humbled" to be President Trump's pick for a place in the top court during a tense Senate confirmation hearing . The 48-year-old conservative jurist vowed to judge legal cases impartially.

She will need at least a majority of the 100-member chamber to be confirmed to the high court, a feat she is expected to cross as Democrats have acknowledged they lack the votes to block her confirmation.

'We wept together': Amy Coney Barrett says George Floyd video was personal for family

More: Amy Barrett's law review articles show how Supreme Court rulings like Roe v. Wade could be challenged

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Senators to grill Amy Coney Barrett on third day of Supreme Court confirmation hearings

Republicans on Senate panel to vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination as Democrats boycott hearing .
The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote on Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation to the Supreme Court on Thursday, setting up a full Senate vote Monday.The Senate Judiciary Committee is set to meet at 9 a.m. EDT. Barrett is expected to be approved by Republicans who hold the majority on the panel, with Democrats saying they will boycott the day's proceedings. The full Senate is expected to take a final vote on Barrett's confirmation on Monday, eight days before Election Day.

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