•   
  •   
  •   

Politics Pete Buttigieg says his 'marriage might depend on what is about to happen' in Amy Coney Barrett's SCOTUS confirmation

19:40  18 october  2020
19:40  18 october  2020 Source:   businessinsider.com

Amy Coney Barrett hearings conclude: Here's what happens next in Supreme Court confirmation

  Amy Coney Barrett hearings conclude: Here's what happens next in Supreme Court confirmation Here’s what to expect and when she could officially be sworn in as the ninth justice on the Supreme Court. More: Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court hearings conclude, paving way for confirmation days before election More: How we got here: The battle over Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court, recapped Committee vote Oct. 22 The Senate Judiciary Committee – the same 22-senator panel that spent the week questioning Barrett – will vote on Oct. 22 at 1 p.m. EDT on Barrett’s nomination.

Peter Buttigieg wearing a microphone: Democratic presidential candidate South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks during a campaign rally, Sunday, Dec. 22, 2019, in Indianola, Iowa. Associated Press/Charlie Neibergall © Associated Press/Charlie Neibergall Democratic presidential candidate South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks during a campaign rally, Sunday, Dec. 22, 2019, in Indianola, Iowa. Associated Press/Charlie Neibergall
  • Former Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg warned of the stakes of Judge Amy Coney Barrett's potential confirmation to the Supreme Court in an interview on "Fox News Sunday."
  • "My marriage might depend on what is about to happen in the senate with regard to this justice," he said.
  • Buttigieg doubled down on Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's criticisms of Barrett's nomination, saying Sunday that the process was "wrong."
  • He also urged the US to "turn the page" from President Donald Trump, who he described as a "destabilizing force" and a "president who is incapable" of handling the novel coronavirus pandemic.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Former Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg warned of the high stakes surrounding Judge Amy Coney Barrett's potential confirmation to the Supreme Court, including the marriage of LGBTQ couples.

Republicans on Senate panel to vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination as Democrats boycott hearing

  Republicans on Senate panel to vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination as Democrats boycott hearing The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote on Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation to the Supreme Court on Thursday, setting up a full Senate vote Monday.The Senate Judiciary Committee is set to meet at 9 a.m. EDT. Barrett is expected to be approved by Republicans who hold the majority on the panel, with Democrats saying they will boycott the day's proceedings. The full Senate is expected to take a final vote on Barrett's confirmation on Monday, eight days before Election Day.

In an interview on "Fox News Sunday," host Chris Wallace asked Buttigieg about Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's views on court-packing, the act of adding more justices to shift the ideological balance.

The former vice president said most recently on an ABC News town hall held this past week that "he is not a fan" of court-packing but will state his position before Election Day, depending on the confirmation process for Barrett.

Buttigieg on Sunday said his views supporting the expanding of the court "haven't changed," and pointed to the policies at play in Barrett's potential confirmation by the Senate.

"We don't want to allow this president to change the subject, which is what they are always doing," Buttigieg told Wallace. "There are all kinds of interesting questions on the future of the American judiciary, but right now as we speak the pre-existing condition coverage of millions of Americans might depend on what is about to happen in the senate with regard to this justice."

Merriam-Webster dictionary updates 'sexual preference' entry after Amy Coney Barrett hearing

  Merriam-Webster dictionary updates 'sexual preference' entry after Amy Coney Barrett hearing Merriam-Webster added the word "offensive" to its usage guidance of "preference" and "sexual preference" when referring to sexual orientation.During the hearing Tuesday, Barrett was asked whether she agrees with the late Justice Antonin Scalia’s criticism of the same-sex marriage ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges – the landmark case which legalized gay marriage in the United States and which advocates worry Barrett would not support if confirmed to the nation's highest court.

"My marriage might depend on what is about to happen in the senate with regard to this justice," Buttigieg added.

In the confirmation hearing, Barrett refused to comment on the Supreme Court's landmark rulings protecting LGBTQ rights and the legalization of birth control because she "can't grade precedent." She also recently apologized for using the term "sexual preference" when referring to LGBTQ Americans' sexual orientation during her hearing.

Wallace also asked Buttigieg about his previous criticism of Biden's vote supporting the Iraq war. Last year during the Democratic race for the presidential nomination, Buttigieg slammed then-fellow candidate Biden's vote as "an example of why years in Washington is not always the same thing as judgment." Biden has since walked back his vote and previous stance that supported use of military force against Iraq, which sparked severe criticism.

Trump-Biden town halls, Amy Coney Barrett hearings, Medicare open enrollment begins: 5 things to know Thursday

  Trump-Biden town halls, Amy Coney Barrett hearings, Medicare open enrollment begins: 5 things to know Thursday NBC and ABC host dueling town halls with Trump and Biden, final day of hearings in Amy Coney Barrett's nomination and more things to know Thursday.Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Buttigieg doubled down on his belief that invading Iraq was "a mistake" but added, "we are not going to take lessons on Iraq policy from this current president who can barely keep straight what's going on in the Middle East and is a destabilizing force everywhere he goes."

He added that "we need to turn the page" from a "president who is incapable of handling a public health crisis that has now cost almost a quarter of a million American lives, thrown our economy into a total wreckage, and clearly has no plan to do anything about it."

Watch the latest video at foxnews.com
Read the original article on Business Insider

Pack the court? Battles between Republicans and Democrats fuel clash over Supreme Court's future .
The Constitution does not set the number of justices. Created in 1789 with six, the court has veered from five to 10, settling at nine 150 years ago.Fuming at what President Donald Trump and Republicans have done since 2016 to turn the court to the right, they could fight back with legislation, Senate rules changes – even by granting statehood (and two Senate seats) to the District of Columbia or Puerto Rico.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks
usr: 1
This is interesting!