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Politics GOP Hopes That Amy Coney Barrett Would Fire Up the Base Fizzled

02:41  21 october  2020
02:41  21 october  2020 Source:   nymag.com

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett strives to show independence from White House, Republicans

  Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett strives to show independence from White House, Republicans The confirmation hearing is wedged closely between Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death and an election in which Republicans could lose power.In a marathon session before the Senate Judiciary Committee just three weeks from Election Day, Barrett was put on the defensive by Democrats charging that she was picked because of her views on abortion, gun rights, same-sex marriage and particularly the health care law headed to the high court for the third time next month.

Judge Amy Coney Barrett is a wife, mother of seven With 21 Republican Senate seats at risk this cycle, compared to only 12 As for the presidential race, “You get fired up for a particular candidate or not,” Cole said. “This is all about Trump.” “At the end of the day, the fact that Trump gets a justice on

"Judge Amy Coney Barrett demonstrated that she has the deep legal expertise, dispassionate judicial temperament, and sheer intellectual horsepower that the American people deserve to have on their Supreme Court," McConnell said Monday. “I look forward to the Judiciary Committee’s vote on

You’d think getting a third Federalist-Society-vetted Supreme Court nominee in a single presidential term would be enough good fortune for Republicans. But when Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died (just over a month ago, incredibly) there was immediate excitement in GOP ranks that a good, vicious confirmation fight for a new conservative justice would be just what the doctor ordered for Republican prospects in November, particularly for an embattled president and his Senate allies. Here’s one of many such prophecies, as reported by the Associated Press:

a close up of a person: Amy Coney Barrett was a very popular pick among conservatives, but her confirmation “battle” so far has been a snoozer. Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images © Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images Amy Coney Barrett was a very popular pick among conservatives, but her confirmation “battle” so far has been a snoozer. Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images

Four years ago, the allure of conservative Supreme Court appointments helped persuade skeptical Republicans to support Donald Trump for president. Two years ago, a contentious clash over Trump’s choice of Brett Kavanaugh for the court was credited with bolstering GOP gains in the Senate in an otherwise bad midterm election.

Senators to grill Amy Coney Barrett on third day of Supreme Court confirmation hearings

  Senators to grill Amy Coney Barrett on third day of Supreme Court confirmation hearings Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court confirmation hearings will continue on Wednesday with senators asking more questions on healthcare, abortion and gunsMembers of the Senate Judiciary Committee will get another chance to question Barrett on her views on the law and a number of hot-button issues that could come before the court.

Also on rt.com Amy Coney Barrett vows to keep politics out of law, but Democrats & Republicans have other ideas as confirmation hearings begin. Barrett has promised to interpret the law “as written, not as the judge wishes it were.” A formal vote in the Senate Judiciary Committee to advance Barrett ’s

Judge Amy Coney Barrett will likely be the next nominee to the Supreme Court. It has already been reported that Amy Coney Barrett has visited President Trump and will likely be his next Up to this point, criticisms of Barrett have largely fallen short. With that said, she has never faced the political

And now, just 44 days before Trump’s reelection will be decided, Republicans are again looking to a Supreme Court nomination fight to unite a deeply fractured party as it faces the very real possibility of losing the White House and control of the Senate this fall.

GOP leaders are optimistic they can pull it off. In the turbulent Trump era, nothing has motivated the Republican Party’s disparate factions to come home quite like the prospect of a lifetime appointment to the nation’s highest court.

Here’s another, from the Washington Post at about the same time:

“Trump needs to fire up conservatives for the election. That’s the goal,” said Mike Davis, a Republican consultant who helped lead the Senate confirmation of Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh in 2018. “That is a big deal for conservatives and will motivate them.”

Trump-Biden town halls, Amy Coney Barrett hearings, Medicare open enrollment begins: 5 things to know Thursday

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CNN's Jake Tapper calls first presidential debate a 'hot mess inside a dumpster fire ' after Trump, Biden clash. At debate, Trump talks over Biden, who fires back: ‘Will you shut up , man?’ Yahoo News. Justice Barrett Would Extend Scalia’s Legacy. National Review.

Amy Coney Barrett has been on Donald Trump's shortlist for Supreme Court vacancies for some time, but the word was that she would be the most appropriate replacement for Ruth Bader Ginsburg. As of last week, that was no longer a hypothetical scenario. Even before Mr Trump reportedly settled on

Now before proceeding into an examination of how that’s working out for the GOP, I’ll pause to examine the dubious premise that Mitch McConnell won it all for Trump in 2016 by keeping Merrick Garland far from the Supreme Court, and that in 2018 the Brett Kavanaugh fight produced a big upset victory for Republican senators.

Yes, 2016 exit polls showed that among the 21 percent of voters who claimed Supreme Court appointments were the most important factor in their candidate choice, Trump won by a comfortable but hardly staggering 56-41 margin. And there’s no question that by naming a list of Supreme Court prospects and creating a process for the strict ideological vetting of judicial nominees, Trump built trust with conservatives – especially white evangelical conservatives – who wound up supporting him overwhelmingly. But it’s really unclear the non-hearings and the non-confirmation of Garland made the shape of the Supreme Court significantly more vital to Trump supporters than a Court with Garland on it might have.

Amy Coney Barrett hearings conclude: Here's what happens next in Supreme Court confirmation

  Amy Coney Barrett hearings conclude: Here's what happens next in Supreme Court confirmation Here’s what to expect and when she could officially be sworn in as the ninth justice on the Supreme Court. More: Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court hearings conclude, paving way for confirmation days before election More: How we got here: The battle over Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court, recapped Committee vote Oct. 22 The Senate Judiciary Committee – the same 22-senator panel that spent the week questioning Barrett – will vote on Oct. 22 at 1 p.m. EDT on Barrett’s nomination.

The long-anticipated October offensive against the Satanic Cabal has gone into full swing, Pentagon sources report. This includes attacks on Deep Underground Military Bases in California, Switzerland, Portugal, Spain, New Zealand, Australia, and Germany, the sources say. The biggest battle was an

Where does amy coney barrett stand on key issues? Once the Senate votes to stop a filibuster, opponents may burn up to 30 hours on the clock before a final confirmation vote. If the Senate takes the cloture vote on Sunday, the Senate could confirm Barrett as early as Monday night

The myth of the Kavanaugh battle saving the Republican Senate in 2018, which is an article of faith for many GOP pols, is even more dubious. Exit polls that year showed voters opposing Kavanaugh’s confirmation by a 47-43 margin, and more impressively, favoring continuation of Roe v. Wade’s constitutional right to choose abortion — by all accounts the driving motivation of conservative SCOTUS-mania — by a 66-25 margins. As I pointed out at the time, the real reason Republican held onto the Senate and even made gains was an insanely favorable landscape, with 26 Democratic as opposed to just nine Republican seats at risk:

In the Senate, Republicans picked up two net seats by winning Democratic-held seats in Florida, Indiana, Missouri, and North Dakota [all states carried by Trump in 2016], while losing seats they held in Arizona [ditto] and Nevada….

Democrats won 22 of the 34 Senate races decided so far [ultimately 22 of 35 after a Mississippi runoff]. And while California complicates the Senate popular-vote picture (because its top-two primary system produced a two-Democrat general election for the Senate), by any measure more people voted for Democrats than Republicans in Senate races. FiveThirtyEight calculates that 27 of 33 Democratic candidates (excluding Mississippi and two-Democrats California) over-performed the partisan lean of their states. So it’s a bit strange to treat the Senate shift as a GOP “mandate” on par with what happened in the House.

Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court hearings lacked the drama that Brett Kavanaugh's proceedings had. Here's why.

  Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court hearings lacked the drama that Brett Kavanaugh's proceedings had. Here's why. Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court confirmation hearings lacked the drama of Brett Kavanaugh's proceedings. Here's why.Democrats warned of the precedent set if Republicans rushed through a nominee in the middle of a pandemic and presidential election, arguing no nominee should be considered until after voters cast ballots. They rattled off threats to slow the process, teasing a host of tools that could bog down the hearings, with some lawmakers even publicly suggesting launching impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump.

The Washington Post's Ruth Marcus discusses Amy Coney Barrett , a possible candidate to fill the seat occupied by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Aired on 09/21

As Judge Amy Coney Barrett was grilled before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, observers Barrett 's knowledge and recall impressed GOP Sen. John Cornyn of Texas. Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett holds up her notepad as she speaks during her confirmation

Even if you do buy the dubious theory that a Supreme Court confirmation war is a guaranteed net base energizer for the GOP, the confirmation hearings of Barrett, which finished last week, were decidedly lacking in drama as compared to the Kavanaugh saga two years ago. The most obvious reason, of course, is that here has been no one coming forward to accuse Barrett of sexual assault, inspiring #MeToo activists and generating total fury among conservative men led by those on the Senate Judiciary Committee. The lower temperature is also attributable to the Democratic strategy for coping with her, as I explained earlier:

Barrett’s background has served as both shield and sword for her proponents in a way that Kavanaugh’s did not. Even before President Trump nominated Barrett to the Supreme Court, Republicans cleverly alleged that Democrats would expose anti-Catholic (or even anti-Christian) animus in an examination of her worldview.

Republicans claim, unfairly, that the opposing party already did this during the 2017 hearings that preceded Barrett’s confirmation to the Seventh Circuit, so in recent days Democrats have given her belief system a wide berth.

Instead Democrats have focused on impact of a more conservative Court on the Affordable Care Act, a regular messaging preoccupation of theirs and not something likely to provoke potential Trump voters to snake-dance to the polls in a state of hate-filled exaltation.

Yes, perhaps getting extra air time chairing the Barrett hearings and defending her on the Senate floor will help lift Lindsey Graham to an unimpressive win over the very impressive Jaime Harrison in South Carolina. But as an all-purpose base-arouser, it’s likely to be overshadowed by the president shouting at suburban women to “please like me!” because he “saved” their neighborhoods from Black and brown and poor people.

Perhaps Democrats unhappy with the handling of the Barrett hearings by Senate Judiciary Committee Democrats should see a silver lining: If you snooze, they lose.

Senate to vote on Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation to Supreme Court following all-night Senate session .
Judge Amy Coney Barrett is poised become the ninth justice on the Supreme Court on Monday, solidifying a 6-3 conservative majority on the high court.The Republican-led Senate is expected to confirm her to the Supreme Court in a vote Monday evening, capping off a sprint to place Barrett on the high court before Election Day over Democratic objections.

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This is interesting!