•   
  •   
  •   

Politics Barrett punts on climate, oil industry recusals in written responses

19:16  21 october  2020
19:16  21 october  2020 Source:   thehill.com

Amy Barrett's law review articles show how Supreme Court rulings like Roe v. Wade could be challenged

  Amy Barrett's law review articles show how Supreme Court rulings like Roe v. Wade could be challenged Amy Coney Barrett's potential to overturn Roe v. Wade is expected to be a flashpoint in her Senate confirmation hearings, set to start Monday.However, Barrett has written law review articles that outline arguments attorneys theoretically could use in trying to strike down that ruling and other precedents, though the writings are analyses that don't urge specific action or say how she would decide specific cases. Among them: She cited legal experts who do not count Roe v. Wade among so-called "super precedents" — Supreme Court decisions that are so ingrained in American life that they can't be overturned.

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett declined to weigh in on climate change or say whether she'd recuse herself from cases involving the oil industry in written responses to questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee ahead of its Thursday vote on her confirmation.

a woman holding a cup: Barrett punts on climate, oil industry recusals in written responses © Greg Nash Barrett punts on climate, oil industry recusals in written responses

In response to several questions on climate, Barrett gave responses including "The Supreme Court has described 'climate change' as a 'controversial subject' and 'sensitive political topic.'''

"As a sitting judge, it would be inappropriate for me to weigh in further on the matter," she added.

Barrett back on Capitol Hill for senators' final questions

  Barrett back on Capitol Hill for senators' final questions WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett returns to Capitol Hill for a third day of confirmation hearings as senators dig deeper into the conservative judge's outlook on abortion, health care and a potentially disputed presidential election — the Democrats running out of time to stop Republicans pushing her quick confirmation. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Wednesday's session is set to be Barrett's last before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

The response echoed statements that Barrett made during her confirmation hearing last week, when she said that she did not hold "firm views" on climate change. She added that her opinion on climate is not "relevant" and called the subject a "contentious matter of public debate."

The vast majority of scientists believe that climate change is happening and human-caused.

Barrett also punted on questions about whether she'd recuse herself from oil companies other than Shell and why the American Petroleum Institute (API), where her father worked, was not on her recusal list. She said that four Shell entities were on her recusal list "in an abundance of caution" because her father worked for Shell Oil Company.

She did not directly say why she didn't similarly recuse herself from any other oil or energy companies, saying that "the question of recusal is a threshold question of law that must be addressed in the context of the facts of each case."

"As Justice [Ruth Bader] Ginsburg described the process that Supreme Court justices go through in deciding whether to recuse, it involves reading the statute, reviewing precedents, and consulting with colleagues. As a sitting judge and as a judicial nominee, it would not be appropriate for me to offer an opinion on abstract legal issues or hypotheticals. Such questions can only be answered through the judicial process," she added.

Senate to vote on Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation to Supreme Court following all-night Senate session .
Judge Amy Coney Barrett is poised become the ninth justice on the Supreme Court on Monday, solidifying a 6-3 conservative majority on the high court.The Republican-led Senate is expected to confirm her to the Supreme Court in a vote Monday evening, capping off a sprint to place Barrett on the high court before Election Day over Democratic objections.

usr: 0
This is interesting!