•   
  •   
  •   

Politics The Senate Judiciary Committee voted to advance Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination — with no Democrats present

18:18  22 october  2020
18:18  22 october  2020 Source:   vox.com

Barrett back on Capitol Hill for senators' final questions

  Barrett back on Capitol Hill for senators' final questions WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett returns to Capitol Hill for a third day of confirmation hearings as senators dig deeper into the conservative judge's outlook on abortion, health care and a potentially disputed presidential election — the Democrats running out of time to stop Republicans pushing her quick confirmation. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Wednesday's session is set to be Barrett's last before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

The unusual nature of Thursday’s committee vote on Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett underscored just how willing Senate Republicans are to continue disregarding established rules. Not a single Democratic senator was present — and Republicans moved forward anyway.

a group of people in a room: Portraits of people who rely on the Affordable Care Act are placed in the seats of Democratic senators on the Judiciary Committee as they boycott the vote on Amy Coney Barrett. © Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call/AFP/Getty Images Portraits of people who rely on the Affordable Care Act are placed in the seats of Democratic senators on the Judiciary Committee as they boycott the vote on Amy Coney Barrett.

The panel approved Barrett’s nomination 12-10 along party lines, bringing her one step closer to a confirmation vote expected to happen next Monday. But they did so despite a Democratic boycott of the meeting, which meant they didn’t have the required number of minority members that’s usually needed to conduct business.

Fact check: Image showing fly on Amy Coney Barrett’s shoulder during hearing posted as a joke

  Fact check: Image showing fly on Amy Coney Barrett’s shoulder during hearing posted as a joke A viral image of a fly on Amy Coney Barrett's shoulder during her Senate hearing is satirical. The poster and video footage confirm there was no fly.A viral image appears to show a fly on Barrett’s shoulder as she sat during the first day of her Senate hearings. A timestamp in the top left corner of the images reveals that it was taken at 2:08 p.m. ET on Capitol Hill.

Per the panel’s rules, two Democratic members need to be present in order to take votes on nominees, but Chair Lindsey Graham (R-SC) simply disregarded this requirement on Thursday — much like he has with similar norms in the past.

As a result, the 12 Republican members who were at the vote unanimously approved Barrett, whose nomination now heads to the Senate floor for a procedural vote on Sunday. That vote, which would end debate on her nomination, sets Barrett up for a final Senate floor vote on Monday.

Why Democrats boycotted the committee vote, briefly explained

Senate Democrats boycotted the committee vote on Thursday in order to question the legitimacy of Barrett’s confirmation process, which they argue was rushed and contrary to past precedent Republicans had set regarding a nomination during an election year.

Trump-Biden town halls, Amy Coney Barrett hearings, Medicare open enrollment begins: 5 things to know Thursday

  Trump-Biden town halls, Amy Coney Barrett hearings, Medicare open enrollment begins: 5 things to know Thursday NBC and ABC host dueling town halls with Trump and Biden, final day of hearings in Amy Coney Barrett's nomination and more things to know Thursday.Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

“This has been a sham process from the beginning,” Judiciary Democrats and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer argued in a statement. “Republicans broke the promises they made and rules they created when they blocked Merrick Garland’s nomination for eight months under President Obama.”

In 2016, Senate Republicans argued that the people should have a voice in the process and refused to consider a nominee until after the presidential election. This year, with just over a month until the election, they moved forward with Barrett’s confirmation.

According to polling by Data For Progress, likely voters are split along party lines regarding whether Barrett should be approved before the election: 19 percent of Democrats think she should be, while 38 percent of independents do, and 82 percent of Republicans feel the same. Meanwhile, 75 percent of likely Democratic voters think this entire process has been rushed, while 38 percent of independents and 30 percent of Republicans agree.

Merriam-Webster dictionary updates 'sexual preference' entry after Amy Coney Barrett hearing

  Merriam-Webster dictionary updates 'sexual preference' entry after Amy Coney Barrett hearing Merriam-Webster added the word "offensive" to its usage guidance of "preference" and "sexual preference" when referring to sexual orientation.During the hearing Tuesday, Barrett was asked whether she agrees with the late Justice Antonin Scalia’s criticism of the same-sex marriage ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges – the landmark case which legalized gay marriage in the United States and which advocates worry Barrett would not support if confirmed to the nation's highest court.

Schumer previously said that Senate Democrats could also boycott the Senate floor vote for Barrett’s nomination and force Republicans to provide the 51-member quorum needed for it to take place. If they end up doing that — Republicans will likely move ahead with the nomination as planned, but Democrats will have, at the very least, sent a message.

Will you help keep Vox free for all?

The United States is in the middle of one of the most consequential presidential elections of our lifetimes. It’s essential that all Americans are able to access clear, concise information on what the outcome of the election could mean for their lives, and the lives of their families and communities. That is our mission at Vox. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone understand this presidential election: Contribute today from as little as $3.

New Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett could have immediate impact on American democracy .
It won't take long for Republicans to learn if Barrett is the reliable conservative upon whom they raced to bestow a seat on the Supreme Court.Upon taking her judicial oath from Chief Justice John Roberts Tuesday, Barrett became the person who could tip the balance on challenges to state election procedures that could determine who wins the White House and control of Congress a week later.

usr: 1
This is interesting!