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Politics Senate advances Amy Coney Barrett nomination, with confirmation expected Monday

21:05  25 october  2020
21:05  25 october  2020 Source:   msn.com

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett moves closer to Senate confirmation as hearing ends

  Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett moves closer to Senate confirmation as hearing ends Republicans brushed aside Democrats' complaints about the partisan process leading to Barrett's expected confirmation during a pandemic and election.Republicans brushed aside Democrats' complaints about the process leading to Barrett's expected confirmation in the midst of a pandemic and a presidential race that the committee chairman acknowledged the GOP may lose.

  • Senate Republicans on Sunday advanced Judge Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court, clearing one of the final hurdles of the 48-year-old nominee's confirmation process.
  • Barrett, a federal appeals court judge on the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, is expected to be confirmed by the Senate on Monday.
  • Sunday's procedural vote divided 51-48 largely along party lines. Two Republicans, Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine, sided with Democrats.
a person wearing a blue shirt: Judge Amy Coney Barrett, U.S. President Donald Trump's Nominee for Supreme Court, gestures during a photo before a meeting with Senator Roy Blunt (R-Mo) on Capitol Hill in Washington DC, U.S. October 21, 2020. © Provided by CNBC Judge Amy Coney Barrett, U.S. President Donald Trump's Nominee for Supreme Court, gestures during a photo before a meeting with Senator Roy Blunt (R-Mo) on Capitol Hill in Washington DC, U.S. October 21, 2020.

Senate Republicans on Sunday advanced Judge Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court, clearing one of the final hurdles of the 48-year-old nominee's confirmation process.

Merriam-Webster dictionary updates 'sexual preference' entry after Amy Coney Barrett hearing

  Merriam-Webster dictionary updates 'sexual preference' entry after Amy Coney Barrett hearing Merriam-Webster added the word "offensive" to its usage guidance of "preference" and "sexual preference" when referring to sexual orientation.During the hearing Tuesday, Barrett was asked whether she agrees with the late Justice Antonin Scalia’s criticism of the same-sex marriage ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges – the landmark case which legalized gay marriage in the United States and which advocates worry Barrett would not support if confirmed to the nation's highest court.

Barrett, a federal appeals court judge on the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, is expected to be confirmed by the Senate on Monday.

Sunday's procedural vote divided 51-48 largely along party lines. Two Republicans, Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine, sided with Democrats.

There was little doubt that Barrett would sail through the vote, and there is less that she will ultimately be confirmed. Murkowski has said that while she opposed the hurried nomination process, she supports Barrett's nomination and will vote to confirm her.

If confirmed, Barrett will replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died last month after serving for 27 years on the bench and earning an unusual degree of celebrity as the senior member of the court's liberal wing.

Fact check: True claim about Harris failing bar exam on first try and Barrett's law school rank

  Fact check: True claim about Harris failing bar exam on first try and Barrett's law school rank A post compares the early career qualifications of Judge Amy Coney Barrett and Sen. Kamala Harris. We rate this claim true.One user took to Facebook to compare the qualifications of the conservative Supreme Court nominee and the Democratic vice presidential nominee.

President Donald Trump has pressed for Barrett to be seated on the high court in time to resolve any litigation that arises as a result of the Nov. 3 election between him and Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

Barrett will give the top court a 6-3 majority of Republican-appointed justices, shifting the panel ideologically rightward on issues from gun control to abortion rights.

Before her nomination to the Supreme Court, Barrett clerked for the influential conservative Justice Antonin Scalia and worked as a professor at Notre Dame Law School. Trump nominated her to the 7th Circuit just over three years ago.

The approval of a Supreme Court nominee with a bare majority is a relatively recent phenomenon.

For decades, the Senate required 60 votes to advance judicial nominees. Democrats lowered the threshold in 2013 to a majority for nominees to courts except the Supreme Court.

In 2017, Republicans led by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., who was critical of the so-called "nuclear option" at the time, lowered the threshold to a majority for Supreme Court picks.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., decried Barrett's advancement on Sunday, calling it a "travesty."

McConnell touted the vote as an "important contribution to the future of this country."

The Kentucky Republican said that many of the GOP's achievements may be undone by the results of the 2020 election.

"They won't be able to do much about this for a long time to come," he said.

Fact check: There is no Sen. Rob Donaldson, so posts of his speech about Barrett are fake .
A post on new Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett originated as a hypothetical. It took off, with many people assuming it was from a real senator.Several Facebook posts shared in the wake of those hearings include a long comment appearing to be a transcript of a speech made by a Sen. Rob Donaldson before the committee.

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