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Politics Election 2020 live updates: Trump, Biden to crisscross Midwestern battleground states

13:40  30 october  2020
13:40  30 october  2020 Source:   washingtonpost.com

Trump, Biden wait with the world for election results in a contest to decide course of America

  Trump, Biden wait with the world for election results in a contest to decide course of America Millions voted in an election between Trump and Biden to determine how the US responds to COVID-19 pandemic, bolsters the economy and heals divisions.Millions turned out to polls for an election that will determine how to respond to a pandemic that has killed a quarter of a million Americans, bolster an economy that has taken a beating from the virus and heal deep divisions over racial injustice.

President Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden plan to crisscross Midwestern battleground states on Friday, with each staging three events across the critical region. Both plan to appear in Minnesota and Wisconsin, while Biden is also touching down in Iowa and Trump is also traveling to Michigan.

a man jumping in the air: Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden makes his way to the podium to deliver remarks at a drive-in event at the Florida State Fairgrounds in Tampa on Thursday. © Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden makes his way to the podium to deliver remarks at a drive-in event at the Florida State Fairgrounds in Tampa on Thursday.

Meanwhile, Vice President Pence is seeking to shore up support in Arizona, while the Democratic vice-presidential nominee, Sen. Kamala D. Harris (Calif.), tries to expand the map in Texas, a state Trump easily won four years ago.

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  Jill Biden will be historic first lady: Just call her ‘Professor FLOTUS’ Jill Biden promises to be a busy first lady: She plans to keep her day job as a college English professor in northern Virginia.After all, she continued teaching at Northern Virginia Community College during the eight years she served as second lady, working closely with the historic then-first lady Michelle Obama.

With four days until Election Day …

  • The Trump campaign is seeking to seize on a perceived opening with conservative-leaning Latinos, hoping to chip away at margins that Biden needs to win in tight battleground races such as those in Pennsylvania and Texas.
  • Coronavirus cases are surging in every competitive state, offering irrefutable evidence against Trump’s closing argument that the pandemic is nearly over and restrictions are no longer necessary.
  • Under a federal appeals court panel decision, Minnesotans must return mail-in ballots by Tuesday to ensure they are counted, upending plans that the state had advertised to keep counting absentee ballots postmarked by Election Day for another week.
  • Biden leads Trump by 10 percentage points nationally, 53 percent to 43 percent, according to an average of national polls since Oct. 12. Biden’s margin in the battleground states of Wisconsin and Michigan is nine points. It is seven points in Pennsylvania, five in Arizona and three in Florida.

The Washington Post wants to hear from you. What has it felt like to vote in this historic presidential election? Share your thoughts and photos with us.

Debate transcript: Trump, Biden final presidential debate moderated by Kristen Welker

  Debate transcript: Trump, Biden final presidential debate moderated by Kristen Welker Here is the full transcript of the final presidential debate between President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden, moderated by Kristen Welker in Nashville on Oct. 22, 2020. Headers have been added for ease of reading. © Mario Tama, Getty Images People are pictured watching the final debate between President Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden at The Abbey in West Hollywood, California. [0:00] Welker: A very good evening to both of you. This debate will cover six major topics.

7:27 AM: In final stretch, Biden camp seeks voters who stayed home in 2016

a close up of a sign: Former president Barack Obama speaks at a rally while campaigning for Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden on Tuesday in Orlando. © John Raoux/AP Former president Barack Obama speaks at a rally while campaigning for Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden on Tuesday in Orlando.

Biden’s team is making a special push in the closing days of the presidential campaign to find and motivate Democrats who voted in 2012 but stayed home in 2016, hoping he gets a crucial boost from this inconsistent group of supporters.

“They’re being very strategic,” said Donna Brazile, a Biden ally and former head of the Democratic National Committee. She said the campaign has asked her to focus on these voters and was being “more strategic than the Clinton campaign was in 2016.”

The effort reflects a broader reality for Democrats: Many of the voters who were energized to come to the polls for Barack Obama did not turn out for Hillary Clinton, contributing heavily to her loss. Now the party wants to do all it can to ensure that this year’s election resembles those in earlier years more than the one in 2016.

The final week in polls: Trump eats into Biden's leads in Arizona, North Carolina, Nevada and Pennsylvania

  The final week in polls: Trump eats into Biden's leads in Arizona, North Carolina, Nevada and Pennsylvania The final polls show the race between Trump and Biden has tightened since mid-October, both nationally and in the critical battleground states.Biden's lead in USA TODAY's average of averages, which is based on data from RealClearPolitics and FiveThirtyEight, reached double-digits on Oct. 12, but has since fallen back to a 7.5-percentage point lead. That leaves him back roughly in the same position USA TODAY found him in its first poll roundup on Sept. 28, when his polling average lead over Trump was 7.2 points.

Read the full story

By: Annie Linskey

7:24 AM: Fact Checker: The biggest Pinocchios of Election 2020

The 2020 presidential campaign largely has been overshadowed by other events, including a presidential impeachment and a worldwide pandemic. But this nasty and brutish campaign is finally coming to an end.

Trump continues to be the king of Pinocchios, amassing 295 since May 2019, with an average rating of 3.64 Pinocchios. (That basically means he almost always received Four Pinocchios.) But Biden was no slouch either, earning 51 Pinocchios with an average rating of 2.67.

A number of times, Biden avoided Pinocchios by admitting error. Biden also spoke far less often than Trump, providing fewer opportunities for fact-checking.

Read the full story

By: Glenn Kessler

7:23 AM: How Trump learned to embrace the executive order, which he once called an ‘easy way out’

Donald Trump reading a book: Trump signs an executive order titled “Comprehensive Plan for Reorganizing the Executive Branch” at the White House on March 13, 2017. © Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post Trump signs an executive order titled “Comprehensive Plan for Reorganizing the Executive Branch” at the White House on March 13, 2017.

Trump’s original entry ban on visitors from seven Muslim-majority nations, issued the week he took office in 2017, became a model for his use of executive power: aggressive, highly politicized and sometimes a bit sloppy.

'It's not over': Trump supporters begin flocking to state capitols after Biden victory is announced

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The order was a hasty attempt to address Trump’s impossible campaign promise of a “total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States.” It prompted global condemnation and cries of racism from critics. And it was revised twice under legal challenges before passing muster with a divided Supreme Court.

Through scores of executive orders and other directives since then, Trump has sought to highlight conservative policy priorities including an immigration crackdown, his still-unfinished border wall, reductions in environmental protections and boosts for domestic energy production.

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By: Anne Gearan

7:21 AM: Appeals court panel rules Minnesota must set aside ballots received after Election Day in case they are invalidated

a woman standing in a room: A voter gets instructions before receiving a ballot from a clerk at the Minneapolis Elections and Voters Services building during the first day of early voting last month in Minneapolis. © Joshua Lott/For The Washington Post A voter gets instructions before receiving a ballot from a clerk at the Minneapolis Elections and Voters Services building during the first day of early voting last month in Minneapolis.

Under a federal appeals court panel decision issued Thursday evening, Minnesotans must return mail-in ballots by Tuesday to ensure they are counted, upending plans the state had advertised to keep counting absentee ballots postmarked by Election Day for another week.

The decision by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit said a Republican lawmaker and GOP activist could challenge the state’s plans to keep counting ballots after the election. The panel said ballots received after Election Day could ultimately be invalidated, sending Democrats scrambling to warn voters.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) urged constituents not to mail their ballots at all, tweeting: “Because of LAST MINUTE ruling, Minnesota DO NOT put ballots in mail any more....Vote in-person or take mail-in ballot directly to ballot box.”

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By: Aaron C. Davis

The week in polls: Trump gains in 9 of 12 swing states, but Biden still leads in 10 of them .
With just eight days to go to Election Day, both national polls and swing state surveys make it clear the race between Trump and Biden is tightening.President Donald Trump gained on his Democratic challenger Joe Biden in national polling averages, and in nine of 12 contested states. But Biden still holds a sizable lead in the national polls and is still ahead of Trump in 10 of the 12 states that could decide the election.

usr: 0
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